Search results for 'Levellers' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alberto Ribeiro Gonçalves de Barros (2010). Levellers e os direitos e liberdades constitucionais. Cadernos de Ética E Filosofia Política 17:7-20.
    The aim of this paper is to present the Levellers’ main political ideas as well as to evaluate the assertion of some scholars that they were the first modern democrats who proposed a written constitution for the protection of natural and inalienable rights. It intends to discuss whether it is possible to see the defence of constitutional rights and freedoms in their pamphlets, almost all written between 1646 and 1649, particularly in the different versions of Agreement of the People.
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    Warren Chernaik (2015). The Levellers: Radical Political Thought in the English Revolution. The European Legacy 20 (7):783-784.
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    Fernando Fernández-Llebrez (2014). Los Levellers y El “Humanismo Radical”: Dentro y Fuera Del Republicanismo. Foro Interno. Anuario de Teoría Política 14.
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  4. H. N. Brailsford & Christopher Hill (1963). The Levellers and the English Revolution. Science and Society 27 (3):341-343.
     
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  5. Alan Houston (1993). A Way of Settlement: The Levellers, Monopolies and the Public Interest. History of Political Thought 14 (3):381-420.
     
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    Geoff Kennedy (2008). Diggers, Levellers, and Agrarian Capitalism: Radical Political Thought in 17th Century England. Lexington Books.
    This book situates the development of radical English political thought within the context of the specific nature of agrarian capitalism and the struggles that ensued around the nature of the state during the revolutionary decade of the 1640s.
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  7. C. B. Macpherson (1962/2011). The Political Theory of Possessive Individualism: Hobbes to Locke. Oxford, Clarendon Press.
    Introduction. The roots of liberal-democratic theory -- Problems of interpretation -- Hobbe : the political obligation of the market. Philosophy and political theory -- Human nature and the state of nature -- Models of society -- Political obligation -- Penetration and limits of Hobbe's political theory -- The Levellers : franchise and freedom. The problem of franchise -- Types of franchise -- The record -- Theoretical implications -- Harrington : the opportunity state. Unexamined ambiguities -- The balance and the (...)
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    E. M. Wood (1992). Locke Against Democracy: Consent, Representation and Suffrage in the "Two Treatises". History of Political Thought 13 (4):657.
    Interpretation of the classics in political theory seems to go in waves. For a while we had John Locke, the bourgeois thinker. Now we seem to be in a Locke-as-radical-democrat phase. Locke-the-bourgeois had problems of its own, but a radically democratic Locke -- not just the old Locke as liberal democrat but Locke as quasi-Leveller -- strains the interpretative imagination more than most; yet in recent years, several different kinds of argument have been advanced in support of it, both textual (...)
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    R. D. Crano (2011). Genealogy, Virtuality, War (1651/1976). Foucault Studies 11:156-178.
    This article recounts Foucault’s critical reevaluation of Thomas Hobbes in his 1975-76 lecture course, published as Society Must Be Defended (2003). In probing Hobbes’ pivotal role in the foundation of the modern nation-state, Foucault delineates the ”philosophico-juridical” discourse of Leviathan from the ”historico-political” discourses of the English insurrectionists whose uncompromising demands were ultimately paved over by the more conventional seventeenth century debate between royalists and parliamentarians. In his most sustained engagement with political philosophy proper, Foucault effectively severs the two co-constitutive (...)
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    Rachel Hammersley (2012). Rethinking the Political Thought of James Harrington: Royalism, Republicanism and Democracy. History of European Ideas 39 (3):354-370.
    Summary Traditional accounts of seventeenth-century English republicanism have usually presented it as inherently anti-monarchical and anti-democratic. This article seeks to challenge and complicate this picture by exploring James Harrington's views on royalism, republicanism and democracy. Building on recent assertions about Harrington's distinctiveness as a republican thinker, the article suggests that the focus on Harrington's republicanism has served to obscure the subtlety and complexity of his moral and political philosophy. Focusing on the year 1659, and the pamphlet war that Harrington and (...)
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  11. R. H. Foxley (2007). Problems of Sovereignty in Leveller Writings. History of Political Thought 28 (4):642-660.
    The English seventeenth-century radicals known as the Levellers are often credited with a ground-breaking social contract theory: believing that England's civil wars and political conflicts had reduced the nation to a state of nature, they proposed `Agreements of the People' which were essentially social contracts to reconstitute political authority in the nation. However, a closer look at their account of the natural state of mankind and the operation of natural law in society reveals that they saw government by consent (...)
     
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  12. François Matheron (2002). Winstanley Et les Diggers. Multitudes 9 (2):69.
    The Diggers, or yet the « true levellers », appropriation of the parochial terrain of the St George’s Hill close to London, might be considered, in the midst of the English revolution, as the proclamation of a constituer power in action. Theorist of this adventure, Gerard Winstanley has left behind him a singular oeuvre in the constellation of« biblical communisms ». Animated by harsh inner tensions, molded by an archaism indissociable from its modernity, it constitutes, at the same time, (...)
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