1. Lewis P. Hinchman & Sandra K. Hinchman (2007). What We Owe the Romantics. Environmental Values 16 (3):333 - 354.
    Romanticism is recognized as a wellspring of modern-day environmental thought and enthusiasm for nature-preservation, but the character of the affinities between the two is less well understood. Essentially, the Romantics realised that nature only becomes a matter for ethical concern, inspiration and love when the mind and sensibility of the human observer/agent are properly attuned and receptive to its meaning. That attunement involves several factors: a more appropriate scientific paradigm, a subtler appreciation of the impact that the setting of human (...)
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  2. Lewis P. Hinchman & Sandra K. Hinchman (eds.) (1997). Memory, Identity, Community: The Idea of Narrative in the Human Sciences. State University of New York Press.
    This multidisciplinary volume documents the resurrection of the importance of narrative to the study of individuals and groups and argues that narrative may become a lingua franca of future debates in the human sciences.
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  3. Lewis P. Hinchman (1991). On Reconciling Happiness and Autonomy. The Owl of Minerva 23 (1):29-48.