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  1. Liah Greenfeld (forthcoming). The Bitter Taste of Success: Reflections on the Intelligentsia in Post-Soviet Russia. Social Research.
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  2. Liah Greenfeld (2005). The Trouble with Social Science. Critical Review 17 (1-2):101-116.
    Abstract Some of the most celebrated theories of nationalism exemplify the self?confirming, evidence?averse, deterministic, and ideological aspects of social science as we know it. What has gone wrong? The social sciences have modeled themselves on physics, failing to grasp the essential difference between the contingent, historical development of cultural particularity and the universal, law?like regularities of inanimate matter. The physicist's tools for conducting the method Popper called ?conjecture and refutation? are largely inappropriate when dealing with imaginative (...)
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  3. Liah Greenfeld (2005). When the Sky is the Limit: Busyness in Contemporary American Society. Social Research: An International Quarterly 72 (2):315-338.
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  4. Liah Greenfeld (1997). Is Nationalism Legitimate? A Sociological Perspective on a Philosophical Question. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (sup1):93-108.
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  5. Liah Greenfeld (1996). The Birth of Economic Competitiveness: Rejoinder to Breckman and Trägårdh. Critical Review 10 (3):409-470.
    Abstract In ?The Worth of Nations? I proposed that nationalism was a major factor in the emergence of the modem, growth?oriented economy. In response to criticisms, I demonstrate here the nationalistic inspiration of seventeenth?century English?or British?economic tracts. Urging a reconsideration of earlier approaches (such as that of W.W. Rostow) to the problem of why?rather than how?the modern economy emerged, I agree with Max Weber's challenge to the naturalness of our proclivity for constant economic expansion, while departing from his explanation for (...)
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  6. Liah Greenfeld (1996). The Modern Religion? Critical Review 10 (2):169-191.
    Abstract Nationalism is an essentially secular form of consciousness, one that, indeed, sacralizes the secular. This renders the temptation to treat it as a religion problematic. The framework of individual and collective identities in modern societies, nationalism both obscures the importance of the transcendental concerns that lie at the core of great religions and undermines their authority. Though instrumental in the development of nationalism, religion now exists on its sufferance and serves mainly as a tool for the promotion of nationalist (...)
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  7. Liah Greenfeld (1995). The Worth of Nations: Some Economic Implications of Nationalism. Critical Review 9 (4):555-584.
    Accounts that attribute nationalism to capitalism or industrialization face the problem of nationalism in late?stage capitalist, or as some might say, post?industrial, societies. While increasing social significance has been attributed to economic growth throughout human history, reasons for this are far from self?evident. By looking at arguments made by Marx, List, and Smith, a new understanding of the relationship between nationalism and economics emerges?one that explains the attribution of social importance to economic development by revealing it as a function of (...)
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  8. Liah Greenfeld & Daniel Chirot (1994). Nationalism and Aggression. Theory and Society 23 (1):79-130.
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  9. Liah Greenfeld (1987). Science and National Greatness in Seventeenth-Century England. Minerva 25 (1-2):107-122.
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