Search results for 'Libkin G' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nancy G. Slack (2003). Are Research Schools Necessary? Contrasting Models of 20th Century Research at Yale Led by Ross Granville Harrison, Grace E. Pickford and G. Evelyn Hutchinson. Journal of the History of Biology 36 (3):501 - 529.score: 27.0
    This paper compares and contrasts three groups that conducted biological research at Yale University during overlapping periods between 1910 and 1970. Yale University proved important as a site for this research. The leaders of these groups were Ross Granville Harrison, Grace E. Pickford, and G. Evelyn Hutchinson, and their members included both graduate students and more experienced scientists. All produced innovative research, including the opening of new subfields in embryology, endocrinology and ecology respectively, over a long period of time. Harrison's (...)
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  2. Kathy Behrendt (2010). Scraping Down the Past: Memory and Amnesia in W. G. Sebald's Anti-Narrative. Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):394-408.score: 24.0
    Vanguard anti-narrativist Galen Strawson declares personal memory unimportant for self-constitution. But what if lapses of personal memory are sustained by a morally reprehensible amnesia about historical events, as happens in the work of W.G. Sebald? The importance of memory cannot be downplayed in such cases. Nevertheless, contrary to expectations, a concern for memory needn’t ally one with the narrativist position. Recovery of historical and personal memory results in self-dissolution and not self-unity or understanding in Sebald’s characters. In the end, Sebald (...)
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  3. Nicholas Vrousalis (2010). G. A. Cohen's Vision of Socialism. Journal of Ethics 14 (3-4):185-216.score: 24.0
    This essay is an attempt to piece together the elements of G. A. Cohen's thought on the theory of socialism during his long intellectual voyage from Marxism to political philosophy. It begins from his theory of the maldistribution of freedom under capitalism, moves onto his critique of libertarian property rights, to his diagnosis of the “deep inegalitarian” structure of John Rawls' theory and concludes with his rejection of the “cheap” fraternity promulgated by liberal egalitarianism. The paper's exegetical contention is that (...)
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  4. José María Gómez Heras (2011). María G. Navarro: Interpretar Argumentando. Isegoría 44:366-372.score: 24.0
    Escribir hoy en día un libro sobre hermenéutica, que tal hermenéutica se refiera a la desarrollada por G. Gadamer en su conocido Verdad y método y que se pretenda añadir algo nuevo a lo mucho escrito sobre el tema parecería, a primera vista, empresa irrealizable. Que ambas pretensiones inspiren la sólida monografía de María G. Navarro —titulada Interpretar y argumentar— constituye empresa audaz y arriesgada, plena de coraje innovador, que provoca admiración, curiosidad e interés. Contra lo que pudiera parecer a (...)
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  5. Charles Pigden (2007). Desiring to Desire: Russell, Lewis and G.E.Moore. In Susana Nuccetelli & Gary Seay (eds.), Themes from G.E.Moore. Oxford University Press. 244-260.score: 24.0
    I have two aims in this paper. In §§2-4 I contend that Moore has two arguments (not one) for the view that that ‘good’ denotes a non-natural property not to be identified with the naturalistic properties of science and common sense (or, for that matter, the more exotic properties posited by metaphysicians and theologians). The first argument, the Barren Tautology Argument (or the BTA), is derived, via Sidgwick, from a long tradition of anti-naturalist polemic. But the second argument, the Open (...)
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  6. Vassiliki Betty Smocovitis (1999). Living with Your Biographical Subject: Special Problems of Distance, Privacy and Trust in the Biography of G. Ledyard Stebbins Jr. Journal of the History of Biology 32 (3):421 - 438.score: 24.0
    This paper explores the special problems encountered by the biographer of a living scientific subject. In particular, it explores the complex of problems that emerges from the intense interpersonal dynamic involving issues of distance, privacy and trust. It also explores methodological problems having to do with oral history interviews and other supporting documentation. It draws on the personal experience of the author and the biographical subject of G. Ledyard Stebbins Jr., the botanist, geneticist and evolutionist. It also offers prescriptives and (...)
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  7. Erich Grädel, Phokion Kolaitis, Libkin G., Marx Leonid, Spencer Maarten, Vardi Joel, Y. Moshe, Yde Venema & Scott Weinstein (2007). Finite Model Theory and its Applications. Springer.score: 24.0
    This book gives a comprehensive overview of central themes of finite model theory – expressive power, descriptive complexity, and zero-one laws – together with selected applications relating to database theory and artificial intelligence, especially constraint databases and constraint satisfaction problems. The final chapter provides a concise modern introduction to modal logic, emphasizing the continuity in spirit and technique with finite model theory. This underlying spirit involves the use of various fragments of and hierarchies within first-order, second-order, fixed-point, and infinitary logics (...)
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  8. Piers J. Hale (2010). Of Mice and Men: Evolution and the Socialist Utopia. William Morris, H.G. Wells, and George Bernard Shaw. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 43 (1):17 - 66.score: 24.0
    During the British socialist revival of the 1880s competing theories of evolution were central to disagreements about strategy for social change. In News from Nowhere (1891), William Morris had portrayed socialism as the result of Lamarckian processes, and imagined a non-Malthusian future. H.G. Wells, an enthusiastic admirer of Morris in the early days of the movement, became disillusioned as a result of the Malthusianism he learnt from Huxley and his subsequent rejection of Lamarckism in light of Weismann's experiments on mice. (...)
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  9. Jakub Gismatullin & Ludomir Newelski (2008). G-Compactness and Groups. Archive for Mathematical Logic 47 (5):479-501.score: 24.0
    Lascar described E KP as a composition of E L and the topological closure of E L (Casanovas et al. in J Math Log 1(2):305–319). We generalize this result to some other pairs of equivalence relations. Motivated by an attempt to construct a new example of a non-G-compact theory, we consider the following example. Assume G is a group definable in a structure M. We define a structure M′ consisting of M and X as two sorts, where X is an (...)
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  10. Daniel O. Plenc (2003). Hacia Una Comprensión Equilibrada de la Doctrina de la Santificación En Los Escritos de Elena G. De White. Enfoques 15 (2).score: 24.0
    Ellen G. White’s writings contribute to clarify the doctrine of sanctification. In her writings sanctification means a submissive acceptance of God’s revealed will and has more to do with integrity and service than with emotions and self-sufficiency. The focus is placed on sanctification as a vit..
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  11. David Rondel (2012). G.A. Cohen and the Logic of Egalitarian Congruence. Socialist Studies 8 (1):82-100.score: 24.0
    In this article, I argue that G. A. Cohen’s defense of the feminist slogan, “The personal is political”, his argument against Rawls’s restriction of principles of justice to the basic structure of society, depends for its intelligibility on the ability to distinguish—with reasonable but perhaps not perfect precision—between those situations in which what Nancy Rosenblum has called “the logic of congruence” is validly invoked and those in which it is not. More importantly, I suggest that the philosophical shape of Cohen’s (...)
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  12. Carl G. Hempel (2001). The Philosophy of Carl G. Hempel: Studies in Science, Explanation, and Rationality. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    Editor James Fetzer presents an analytical and historical introduction and a comprehensive bibliography together with selections of many of Carl G. Hempel's most important studies to give students and scholars an ideal opportunity to appreciate the enduring contributions of one of the most influential philosophers of science of the 20th century.
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  13. Jose G. Vargas & Douglas G. Torr (1999). The Cartan-Einstein Unification with Teleparallelism and the Discrepant Measurements of Newton's Constant G. Foundations of Physics 29 (2):145-200.score: 21.0
    We show that in 1929 Cartan and Einstein almost produced a theory in which the electromagnetic (EM) field constitutes the time-like 2-form part of the torsion of Finslerian teleparallel connections on pseudo-Riemannian metrics. The primitive state of the theory of these connections would not, and did not, permit Cartan and Einstein to realize how their torsion field equations contained the Maxwell system and how the Finslerian torsion contains the EM field. Cartan and Einstein discussed curvature field equations, though failing to (...)
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  14. N. Vrousalis (2012). Jazz Bands, Camping Trips and Decommodification: G. A. Cohen on Community. Socialist Studies 8 (1):141-163.score: 21.0
  15. Jaime Nubiola (2009). Review of H.G. Callaway (Ed), William James, A Pluralistic Universe. [REVIEW] Anuario Filosófico 42 (1):222-223.score: 21.0
    As suggested in the subtitle, A New Philosophical Reading, the editor aspires in his Introduction and his notes to “facilitate a deeper understanding and a critical evaluation (...) of this crucial and difficult philosophical work” (p. ix). This was the last important book which James published during his lifetime. With it James aims at a critical evaluation of Hegelian monism and an exploration of the philosophical and theological alternatives. “Our world of some one hundred years on”—the editor says (p. ix)—“is (...)
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  16. Acta Philosophica (2012). Notice of 'Interpretar y Argumentar' by María G. Navarro. [REVIEW] Acta Philosophica (21):214.score: 21.0
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  17. Richard A. S. Hall (2009). Review of H.G. Callaway (Ed) R.W. Emerson, Society and Solitude: Twelve Chapters. [REVIEW] The Pluralist 4 (No.1):118-123.score: 21.0
    Howard Callaway's new edition of Ralph Waldo Emerson's Society and Solitude is an invaluable contribution to both the primary and secondary literature on Emerson. Its contribution to the primary sources is its use of the original 1870 edition of Emerson's text, though with modernized spellings to facilitate the reader's understanding. Its contribution to the secondary literature consists in the scholarly apparatus of page-by-page annotations, an introduction, a chronology, a bibliography, and an index. Callaway's Society and Solitude is a worthy companion (...)
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  18. Ambrosio Velasco (2011). Book review of Interpretar y argumentar by María G. Navarro. [REVIEW] Theoria 24:103-106.score: 21.0
  19. Noemi de Haro (2012). Notice of 'Interpretar y Argumentar' by María G. Navarro. Revista Areté (1):217-219.score: 21.0
    ¿Qué es razonar?, ¿qué es interpretar?, ¿cómo podemos estar seguros de que determinadas interpretaciones, en ciertos contextos políticos, sociales, culturales, etc., son más razonables que otras? Estas preguntas se encuentran en el origen de dos tradiciones de pensamiento: la hermenéutica y la analítica.
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  20. Jaime Nubiola (2006). Review of H.G. Callaway (Ed) R.W. Emerson, The Conduct of Life: A Philosophical Reading. [REVIEW] Anuario Filosófico 39 ( 3):817-818.score: 21.0
    We find before us an excellent edition of the book which the influential American thinker Ralph Waldo Emerson (1802-82) published in December of 1860, four months before the outbreak of the American Civil War. The central question which Emerson poses in this volume concerns the conduct of life, that is, of how to live. The titles of the nine essays, which compose the book, illustrate the themes tackled: “Fate,” “Power,” “Wealth”, “Culture,” “Behavior,” “Worship”, “Considerations by the Way,” “Beauty” and “Illusions.” (...)
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  21. Michael Wreen (1997). H.G. Callaway, Context for Meaning and Analysis: A Critical Study in the Philosophy of Language. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 46 (3):401-405.score: 21.0
    Context is mainly a critical history of one of the central strands – arguably, the central strand – of the analytic tradition in philosophy, namely, the philosophy of language. Key figures that put in an appearance include Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Carnap, Ayer, Hempel, Tarski, Quine, Davidson, Putnam, and Dewey, the last being a somewhat odd figure, given the general tenor of Callaway’s cavalcade of stars. Meaning and analysis are the focus of attention, and true to his title, Callaway doesn’t hesitate (...)
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  22. George Mead, Various G.H. Mead Texts.score: 21.0
    The shift in focus has changed the nature of the Project in a way which we hadn't expected and didn't really notice until this revision. Back in the late 1980s, we started the project as a "work around" for a situation that we found personally frustrating. We believed that widely-held beliefs about Mead's ideas were misinterpretations. But his published statements were often difficult to obtain. It was easier for scholars to rely from the secondary literature about Mead than to consult (...)
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  23. Tom G. Palmer (1998). G. A. Cohen on Self‐Ownership, Property, and Equality. Critical Review 12 (3):225-251.score: 21.0
    Abstract G.A. Cohen has produced an influential criticism of libertarian?ism that posits joint ownership of everything in the world other than labor, with each joint owner having a veto right over any potential use of the world. According to Cohen, in that world rationality would require that wealth be divided equally, with no differential accorded to talent, ability, or effort. A closer examination shows that Cohen's argument rests on two central errors of reasoning and does not support his egalitarian conclusions, (...)
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  24. Allen G. Debus, Paul Harold Theerman & Karen Hunger Parshall (eds.) (1997). Experiencing Nature: Proceedings of a Conference in Honor of Allen G. Debus. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 21.0
    This volume, honoring the renowned historian of science, Allen G Debus, explores ideas of science - `experiences of nature' - from within a historiographical tradition that Debus has done much to define. As his work shows, the sciences do not develop exclusively as a result of a progressive and inexorable logic of discovery. A wide variety of extra-scientific factors, deriving from changing intellectual contexts and differing social millieus, play crucial roles in the overall development of scientific thought. These essays represent (...)
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  25. Paul Gochet (2005). W.V. Quine\H.G. Callaway, Wissenschaft Und Empfindung, Die Immanuel Kant Lectures. [REVIEW] Dialectica 59 (3):375-378.score: 21.0
    Quine's Immanuel Kant lectures were delivered in English at Stanford University in 1980 under the title Science and Sensibilia. The English version of the text has never been published. An Italian translation by Michele Leonelli, La Scienza e I Dati di Senso appeared in 1987. These translations fill an important gap. Wissenschaft und Empfindung strikes me as the best presentation of Quine's physicalistic program.
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  26. G. E. L. Owen, Malcolm Schofield & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.) (1982/2006). Language and Logos: Studies in Ancient Greek Pgilosophy Presented to G.E.L. Owen. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    The essays in this volume were written to celebrate the sixtieth birthday of G. E. L. Owen, who by his essays and seminars on ancient Greek philosophy has made a contribution to its study that is second to none. The authors, from both sides of the Atlantic, include not only scholars whose main research interests lie in Greek philosophy, but others best known for their work in general philosophy. All are pupils or younger colleagues of Professor Owen who are indebted (...)
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  27. Barbara Majcher‐Iwanow (2005). Gδ‐Pieces of Canonical Partitions of G‐Spaces. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 51 (5):450-461.score: 21.0
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  28. Laura Regué, Fan Mou & Joseph Avruch (2013). G Protein‐Coupled Receptors Engage the Mammalian Hippo Pathway Through F‐Actin. Bioessays 35 (5):430-435.score: 21.0
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  29. Carl G. Hempel, Donald Davidson & Nicholas Rescher (eds.) (1970). Essays in Honor of Carl G. Hempel. Dordrecht,D. Reidel.score: 21.0
    Reminiscences of Peter, by P. Oppenheim.--Natural kinds, by W. V. Quine.--Inductive independence and the paradoxes of confirmation, by J. Hintikka.--Partial entailment as a basis for inductive logic, by W. C. Salmon.--Are there non-deductive logics?, by W. Sellars.--Statistical explanation vs. statistical inference, by R. C. Jeffre--Newcomb's problem and two principles of choice, by R. Nozick.--The meaning of time, by A. Grünbaum.--Lawfulness as mind-dependent, by N. Rescher.--Events and their descriptions: some considerations, by J. Kim.--The individuation of events, by D. Davidson.--On properties, by (...)
     
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  30. Kees Jalink & Wouter H. Moolenaar (2010). G Protein‐Coupled Receptors: The Inside Story. Bioessays 32 (1):13-16.score: 21.0
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  31. Laurence Perbal (2013). G×E Interaction and Pluralism in the Postgenomic Era. Biological Theory 7 (3):266-274.score: 21.0
    Genetics is in a postgenomic era, and this article illustrates this epistemological evolution using the debate between developmental criticism and traditional biometric genetics about gene × environment interaction. Quantitative geneticists are blamed for failing to respect the complexity of development; as a response, they claim a defensive position, called isolationist pluralism, which supports the idea that studying development is not their problem. But postgenomics seems to have accepted and integrated some developmental criticisms and the isolationist perspective has been challenged during (...)
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  32. C. G. Jung & Sonu Shamdasani (2010). Dreams: (From Volumes 4, 8, 12, and 16 of the Collected Works of C. G. Jung) (New in Paper). Princeton University Press.score: 21.0
    "From The collected works of C.G. Jung, volumes 4, 8, 12, 16"--P. [i].
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  33. Nadine Kabbani, Jacob C. Nordman, Brian A. Corgiat, Daniel P. Veltri, Amarda Shehu, Victoria A. Seymour & David J. Adams (2013). Are Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Coupled to G Proteins? Bioessays 35 (12):1025-1034.score: 21.0
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  34. U. G. Krishnamurti (1987). Disquieting Conversations with the Man Called U. G.: Mind is a Myth. Crest Associates.score: 21.0
     
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  35. G. E. Moore (1993). G.E. Moore: Selected Writings. Routledge.score: 21.0
    G.E. Moore, more than either Bertrand Russell or Ludwig Wittgenstein, was chiefly responsible for the rise of the analytic method in twentieth-century philosophy. This selection of his writings shows Moore at his very best. The classic essays are crucial to major philosophical debates that still resonate today. Amongst those included are: * A Defense of Common Sense * Certainty * Sense-Data * External and Internal Relations * Hume's Theory Explained * Is Existence a Predicate? * Proof of an External World (...)
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  36. Phil Oliver (2009). Review: H.G. Callaway (Ed.) James, A Pluralistic Universe by William James. [REVIEW] Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 37 (108).score: 21.0
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  37. Miriam Ronzoni & Laura Valentini (2008). On the Meta-Ethical Status of Constructivism: Reflections on G.A. Cohen's `Facts and Principles'. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 7 (4):403-422.score: 18.0
    The Queen's College, Oxford, UK In his article `Facts and Principles', G.A. Cohen attempts to refute constructivist approaches to justification by showing that, contrary to what their proponents claim, fundamental normative principles are fact- in sensitive. We argue that Cohen's `fact-insensitivity thesis' does not provide a successful refutation of constructivism because it pertains to an area of meta-ethics which differs from the one tackled by constructivists. While Cohen's thesis concerns the logical structure of normative principles, constructivists ask how normative principles (...)
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  38. Andrew Altman (2004). Breathing Life Into a Dead Argument: G.E. Moore and the Open Question. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 117 (3):395-408.score: 18.0
    A century after its publication, G.E. Moore''sPrincipia Ethica stands as one of theclassic statements of anti-naturalism inethics. Moore claimed that the most basic ethicalproperties were denoted by `good'' and `bad'' andthat all naturalist accounts of thoseproperties were inadequate. His open-questionargument aimed to refute any proposedidentification of good with some naturalproperty, and Moore concluded from theargument that good must be a nonnaturalproperty.The received view is that the open-questionargument is a failure. In this paper,my aim is to breathe some life back intoMoore''s (...)
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  39. H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr (2010). Moral Obligation After the Death of God: Critical Reflections on Concerns From Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, and Elizabeth Anscombe. [REVIEW] In Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.), Moral Obligation. Cambridge University Press. 317-340.score: 18.0
    Once God is no longer recognized as the ground and the enforcer of morality, the character and force of morality undergoes a significant change, a point made by G.E.M. Anscombe in her observation that without God the significance of morality is changed, as the word criminal would be changed if there were no criminal law and criminal courts. There is no longer in principle a God's-eye perspective from which one can envisage setting moral pluralism aside. In addition, it becomes impossible (...)
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  40. Francisco J. Gonzalez (2006). Dialectic and Dialogue in the Hermeneutics of Paul Ricœur and H.G. Gadamer. Continental Philosophy Review 39 (3):313-345.score: 18.0
    The present paper uses the theme of dialectic and dialogue to begin unraveling the similarities and differences between the hermeneutics of Paul Ricoeur and H.G. Gadamer. Ricoeur is shown to distance himself from Heidegger by insisting on a dimension of explanation and distanciation (which he sometimes identifies with Plato's `descending dialectic') that cannot be reduced to, or absorbed by, understanding and appropriation. This same move, however, leads him to reject Platonic dialogue, with the attendant prioritizing of oral conversation over the (...)
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  41. Jan Narveson (1998). Libertarianism Vs. Marxism: Reflections on G. A. Cohen's Self-Ownership, Freedom and Equality. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 2 (1):1-26.score: 18.0
    Self-Ownership, Freedom and Equality is G.A. Cohens attempt to rescue something of the socialist outlook on society from the challenge of libertarianism, which Cohen identifies with the work of Robert Nozick in his famous book, Anarchy, State, and Utopia. Sympathizing with the leading idea that a person must belong to himself, and thus be unavailable for forced redistribution of his efforts, Cohen is at pains to reconcile the two. This cannot be done – they are flatly contrary. Moreover, equality (...)
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  42. Nikolay Milkov (2004). G. E. Moore and the Greifswald Objectivists on the Given and the Beginning of Analytic Philosophy. Axiomathes 14 (4):361-379.score: 18.0
    Shortly before G. E. Moore wrote down the formative for the early analytic philosophy lectures on Some Main Problems of Philosophy (1910–1911), he had become acquainted with two books which influenced his thought: (1) a book by Husserl's pupil August Messer and (2) a book by the Greifswald objectivist Dimitri Michaltschew. Central to Michaltschew's book was the concept of the given. In Part I, I argue that Moore elaborated his concept of sense-data in the wake of the Greifswald concept. Carnap (...)
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  43. Joachim L. Dagg, Arthur G. Tansley’s ‘New Psychology’ and its Relation to Ecology. Web Ecology 2007.score: 18.0
    In 1935, A. G. Tansley, who was knighted later, proposed the ecosystem concept. Nevertheless, this concept was not without predecessors. Why did Tansley’s ecosystem prevail and not one of its competitors? The purpose of this article is to pin the distinguishing features of Tansley’s ecosystem down, as far as the published record allows. It is an exercise in finding the difference that made a difference. Besides being a pioneering ecologist, Tansley was an adept of psychoanalysis. His interest even led him (...)
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  44. Sean Sayers (1984). Marxism and the Dialectical Method: A Critique of G.A. Cohen. Radical Philosophy (36):4-13.score: 18.0
    The dialectical method, Marx Insisted, was at the basis of his account of society. In 1858, in a letter to Engels, he wrote: In the method of treatment the fact that by mere accident I again glanced through Hegel's Logic has been of great service to me... If there should ever be the time for such work again, I would greatly like to make accessible to the ordinary human intelligence, in two or three printer's sheets, what is rational in the (...)
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  45. H. G. Callaway (ed.) (2003). W.V. Quine, Immanuel Kant Lectures, translated and introduced by H.G. Callaway. Frommann-Holzboog.score: 18.0
    This book is a translation of W.V. Quine's Kant Lectures, given as a series at Stanford University in 1980. It provide a short and useful summary of Quine's philosophy. There are four lectures altogether: I. Prolegomena: Mind and its Place in Nature; II. Endolegomena: From Ostension to Quantification; III. Endolegomena loipa: The forked animal; and IV. Epilegomena: What's It all About? The Kant Lectures have been published to date only in Italian and German translation. The present book is filled out (...)
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  46. Wesley C. Salmon (1999). The Spirit of Logical Empiricism: Carl G. Hempel's Role in Twentieth-Century Philosophy of Science. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):333-350.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I discuss the key role played by Carl G. Hempel's work on theoretical realism and scientific explanation in effecting a crucial philosophical transition between the beginning and the end of the twentieth century. At the beginning of the century, the dominant view was that science is incapable of furnishing explanations of natural phenomena; at the end, explanation is widely viewed as an important, if not the primary, goal of science. In addition to its intellectual benefits, this transition (...)
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  47. Peter Vallentyne (1998). Critical Notice of G.A. Cohen’s Self-Ownership, Freedom, and Equality. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28:609-626.score: 18.0
    G.A. Cohen’s book brings together and elaborates on articles that he has written on selfownership, on Marx’s theory of exploitation, and on the future of socialism. Although seven of the eleven chapters have been previously published (1977-1992), this is not merely a collection of articles. There is a superb introduction that gives an overview of how the chapters fit together and of their historical relation to each other. Most chapters have a new introduction and often a postscript or addendum that (...)
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  48. Anthony Coleman (2012). G. E. Moore and Bad Faith. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (3):347-365.score: 18.0
    Abstract: G. E. Moore claimed to know a variety of commonsense propositions. He is often accused of being dogmatic or of begging the question against philosophers who deny that he knows such things. In this paper, I argue that this accusation is mistaken. I argue that Moore is instead guilty of answering questions of the form ‘Do I know p?’ in bad faith.
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  49. Erasmo Recami (1983). A Modified Large Number Theory Withconstant G. Foundations of Physics 13 (3):341-346.score: 18.0
    The inspiring “numerology” uncovered by Dirac, Eddington, Weyl,et al. can be explained and derived when it is slightly modified so to connect the “gravitational world” (cosmos) with the “strong world” (hadron), rather than with the electromagnetic one.The aim of this note is to show the following. In the present approach to the “Large Number Theory,” cosmos and hadrons are considered to be (finite)similar systems, so that the ratio ${{\bar R} \mathord{\left/ {\vphantom {{\bar R} {\bar r}}} \right. \kern-0em} {\bar r}}$ of (...)
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  50. Jonas Olson (2006). G. E. Moore on Goodness and Reasons. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (4):525 – 534.score: 18.0
    Several proponents of the 'buck-passing' account of value have recently attributed to G. E. Moore the implausible view that goodness is reason-providing. I argue that this attribution is unjustified. In addition to its historical significance, the discussion has an important implication for the contemporary value-theoretical debate: the plausible observation that goodness is not reason-providing does not give decisive support to the buck-passing account over its Moorean rivals. The final section of the paper is a survey of what can be said (...)
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