Search results for 'Life sciences Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. G. M. N. Verschuuren (1986). Investigating the Life Sciences: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science. Pergamon Press.score: 147.0
  2. Catherine Kendig (2013). Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam's Historia Insectorum Generalis and the Case of the Water Flea. Science and Education 22 (8):1939-1961.score: 130.3
    Hasok Chang (Science & Education 20:317–341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science education. In this paper I describe the implementation of an integrated learning project that I initiated, organized, and structured to complement a course in history and philosophy of the life (...)
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  3. Wim J. Van der Steen (1998). Forging Links Between Philosophy, Ethics, and the Life Sciences: A Tale of Disciplines and Trenches. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20 (2):233 - 248.score: 122.0
    Philosophy of medicine and its daughter bioethics seldom undertake a critical analysis of live medical science. That is a serious shortcoming since some forms of bias in medical science have a negative impact on health care. Most notably, many areas of medicine focus on a restricted area of biology to the exclusion of ecology. Ecological thinking should lead to fundamental changes in medicine and the philosophy of medicine.
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  4. Miles MacLeod & Thomas A. C. Reydon (2013). Natural Kinds in Philosophy and in the Life Sciences: Scholastic Twilight or New Dawn? [REVIEW] Biological Theory 7 (2):89-99.score: 116.0
    This article, which is intended both as a position paper in the philosophical debate on natural kinds and as the guest editorial to this thematic issue, takes up the challenge posed by Ian Hacking in his paper, “Natural Kinds: Rosy Dawn, Scholastic Twilight.” Whereas a straightforward interpretation of that paper suggests that according to Hacking the concept of natural kinds should be abandoned, both in the philosophy of science and in philosophy more generally, we suggest that an alternative (...)
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  5. Michel Morange (2001). On the Relations Between History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences and Biology. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (1):65 - 74.score: 116.0
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  6. Ohad Nachtomy & Justin E. H. Smith (eds.) (2014). The Life Sciences in Early Modern Philosophy. Oup Usa.score: 116.0
    This volume explores the intersection between early modern philosophy and the life sciences by presenting the contributions of important but often neglected figures such as Cudworth, Grew, Glisson, Hieronymus Fabricius, Stahl, Gallego, Hartsoeker, and More, as well as familiar figures such as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Malebranche, and Kant.
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  7. Wim J. Van der Steen (1998). Forging Links Between Philosophy, Ethics, and the Life Sciences: A Tale of Disciplines and Trenches. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20 (2):233-248.score: 116.0
     
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  8. Massimo Pigliucci (2012). Answers for Aristotle: How Science and Philosophy Can Lead Us to A More Meaningful Life. Basic Books.score: 103.3
    How should we live? According to philosopher and biologist Massimo Pigliucci, the greatest guidance to this essential question lies in combining the wisdom of 24 centuries of philosophy with the latest research from 21st century science. In Answers for Aristotle, Pigliucci argues that the combination of science and philosophy first pioneered by Aristotle offers us the best possible tool for understanding the world and ourselves. As Aristotle knew, each mode of thought has the power to clarify the other: (...)
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  9. Mark Kac (1972). Advances in the Physical and Life Sciences. Washington,American Association for the Advancement of Science.score: 102.0
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  10. Sophia Connell (2003). Aristotle's Philosophy of Biology: Studies in the Origins of Life Sciences. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (3):509-513.score: 93.0
  11. Cristina Chimisso (2013). The Life Sciences and French Philosophy of Science: Georges Canguilhem on Norms. In. In Hanne Andersen, Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao González, Thomas Uebel & Gregory Wheeler (eds.), New Challenges to Philosophy of Science. Springer Verlag. 399--409.score: 93.0
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  12. Guy Murchie (1978). The Seven Mysteries of Life: An Exploration in Science & Philosophy. Houghton Mifflin.score: 88.3
     
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  13. Lisa Shapiro & Karen Detlefsen (2003). Dennis Des Chene is Professor of Philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis. His Research Interests Are in Early Modern Philosophy and Sci-Ence, and He has Written on Natural Philosophy—Including Physics and the Life Sciences—in Late Scholastic and Cartesian Thought. [REVIEW] Perspectives on Science 11 (4).score: 88.0
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  14. Marshall Abrams, Andre Aiiew, Minus van Baalen, Domenico Benoloni Meli, Pietro Corsi, Francois Duchesneau, John Dupré, Paul Farber, Paul Griffiths & Jean Gayon (2013). History, Philosophy and Theory of the Life Sciences. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (3):316-331.score: 87.0
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  15. Pierre-Olivier Méthot, Miles MacLeod, Susanne Bauer, Fridolin Gross & Antonine Nicoglou (2010). Meeting Disciplinary Boundaries: Towards a More Inclusive Philosophy of the Life Sciences. Biological Theory (3):292-294.score: 87.0
  16. Ann-Sophie Barwich & Alba Amilburu (2011). Bridging Disciplines? An Inquiry on the Future of Natural Kinds in Philosophy and the Life Sciences. Biological Theory 6 (2):187-190.score: 87.0
  17. Wim J. van der Steen (1993). A Practical Philosophy for the Life Sciences. State University of New York Press.score: 87.0
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  18. Tudor M. Baetu, Ann-Sophie Barwich, Daniel Brooks, Sébastien Dutreuil & Pierre-Luc Germain (2013). Model Thinking in the Life Sciences: Complexity in the Making: Second European Advanced Seminar in the Philosophy of the Life Sciences,“In Vivo, Ex Vivo, in Vitro, in Silico: Models in the Life Sciences” Hermance, Switzerland, 10–14 September 2012.(Meeting Report). [REVIEW] Biological Theory 8 (1):121 - 124.score: 87.0
     
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  19. Ann-Sophie Barwich & Alba Amilburu (2012). Bridging Disciplines? An Inquiry on the Future of Natural Kinds in Philosophy and the Life Sciences: Natural Kinds in Philosophy and in the Life Sciences: Scholastic Twilight or New Dawn? Granada, Spain, 7–9 September 2011 (Meeting Report). [REVIEW] Biological Theory 6 (2):187-190.score: 87.0
     
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  20. R. Skipper Jr, C. Allen, R. A. Ankeny, C. F. Craver, L. Darden, G. Mikkelson & R. Richardson (eds.) (forthcoming). Philosophy and the Life Sciences: A Reader. MIT Press.score: 87.0
  21. Nancy L. Jones (2007). A Code of Ethics for the Life Sciences. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (1):25-43.score: 85.0
    The activities of the life sciences are essential to provide solutions for the future, for both individuals and society. Society has demanded growing accountability from the scientific community as implications of life science research rise in influence and there are concerns about the credibility, integrity and motives of science. While the scientific community has responded to concerns about its integrity in part by initiating training in research integrity and the responsible conduct of research, this approach is minimal. (...)
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  22. John C. Waller (2001). Gentlemanly Men of Science: Sir Francis Galton and the Professionalization of the British Life-Sciences. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 34 (1):83 - 114.score: 84.0
    Because Francis Galton (1822-1911) was a well-connected gentleman scientist with substantial private means, the importance of the role he played in the professionalization of the Victorian life-sciences has been considered anomalous. In contrast to the X-clubbers, he did not seem to have any personal need for the reforms his Darwinist colleagues were advocating. Nor for making common cause with individuals haling from social strata clearly inferior to his own. However, in this paper I argue that Galton quite realistically (...)
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  23. S. Müller-Wille (2012). Hans-Jorg Rheinberger: Temporality in the Life Sciences and Beyond. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 35 (1):5-7.score: 83.0
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  24. Elías Palti (1999). The "Metaphor of Life": Herder's Philosophy of History and Uneven Developments in Late Eighteenth-Century Natural Sciences. History and Theory 38 (3):322–347.score: 81.0
  25. Mark Bedau (ed.) (2010). The Nature of Life: Classical and Contemporary Perspectives From Philosophy and Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 76.3
    Bringing together the latest scientific advances and some of the most enduring subtle philosophical puzzles and problems, this book collects original historical and contemporary sources to explore the wide range of issues surrounding the nature of life. Selections ranging from Aristotle and Descartes to Sagan and Dawkins are organised around four broad themes covering classical discussions of life, the origins and extent of natural life, contemporary artificial life creations and the definition and meaning of 'life' (...)
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  26. Mark Bedau & Carol Cleland (eds.) (2010). The Nature of Life: Classical and Contemporary Perspectives From Philosophy and Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 76.3
    Bringing together the latest scientific advances and some of the most enduring subtle philosophical puzzles and problems, this book collects original historical and contemporary sources to explore the wide range of issues surrounding the nature of life. Selections ranging from Aristotle and Descartes to Sagan and Dawkins are organised around four broad themes covering classical discussions of life, the origins and extent of natural life, contemporary artificial life creations and the definition and meaning of 'life' (...)
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  27. Matti Sintonen, Petri Ylikoski & Kaarlo Miller (eds.) (2003). Realism in Action: Essays in the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 76.0
    Realism in Action is a selection of essays written by leading representatives in the fields of action theory and philosophy of mind, philosophy of the social sciences and especially the nature of social action, and of epistemology and philosophy of science. Practical reason, reasons and causes in action theory, intending and trying, and folk-psychological explanation are some of the topics discussed by these leading participants. A particular emphasis is laid on trust, commitments and social institutions, on (...)
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  28. Chrysostomos Mantzavinos (ed.) (2009). Philosophy of the Social Sciences: Philosophical Theory and Scientific Practice. Cambridge University Press.score: 76.0
    This volume is a unique contribution to the philosophy of the social sciences, presenting the results of cutting-edge philosophers' research alongside critical discussions by practicing social scientists. The book is motivated by the view that the philosophy of the social sciences cannot ignore the specific scientific practices according to which social scientific work is being conducted, and that it will be valuable only if it evolves in constant interaction with theoretical developments in the social sciences. (...)
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  29. Mark J. Smith (ed.) (2005). Philosophy & Methodology of the Social Sciences. Sage.score: 76.0
    This is a comprehensive and authoritative reference collection in the philosophy and methodology of the social sciences. The source materials selected are drawn from debates within the natural sciences as well as social scientific practice. This four volume set covers the traditional literature on the philosophy of the social sciences, and the contemporary philosophical and methodological debates developing at the heart of the disciplinary and interdisciplinary groups in the social sciences. It addresses the needs (...)
     
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  30. Yam San Chee (2014). Interrogating the Learning Sciences as a Design Science: Leveraging Insights From Chinese Philosophy and Chinese Medicine. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (1):89-103.score: 75.0
    Design research has been positioned as an important methodological contribution of the learning sciences. Despite the publication of a handbook on the subject, the practice of design research in education remains an eclectic collection of specific approaches implemented by different researchers and research groups. In this paper, I examine the learning sciences as a design science to identify its fundamental goals, methods, affiliations, and assumptions. I argue that inherent tensions arise when attempting to practice design research as an (...)
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  31. Susan Haack (2008). Putting Philosophy to Work: Inquiry and its Place in Culture: Essays on Science, Religion, Law, Literature, and Life. Prometheus Books.score: 74.0
    Staying for an answer : the untidy process of groping for truth -- The same, only different -- The unity of truth and the plurality of truths -- Coherence, consistency, cogency, congruity, cohesiveness, &c. : remain calm! don't go overboard! -- Not cynicism, but synechism : lessons from classical pragmatism -- Science, economics, "vision" -- The integrity of science : what it means, why it matters -- Scientific secrecy and "spin" : the sad, sleazy story of the trials of remune (...)
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  32. Lorenz Krüger, Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (eds.) (2005). Why Does History Matter to Philosophy and the Sciences? Walter DeGruyter.score: 72.0
    What are the relationships between philosophy and the history of philosophy, the history of science and the philosophy of science? This selection of essays by Lorenz Krüger (1932-1994) presents exemplary studies on the philosophy of John Locke and Immanuel Kant, on the history of physics and on the scope and limitations of scientific explanation, and a realistic understanding of science and truth. In his treatment of leading currents in 20th century philosophy, Krüger presents new and (...)
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  33. Matthew Lamb (2011). Philosophy as a Way of Life: Albert Camus and Pierre Hadot. Sophia 50 (4):561-576.score: 72.0
    This paper compares Pierre Hadot’s work on the history of philosophy as a way of life to the work of Albert Camus. I will argue that in the early work of Camus, up to and including the publication of The Myth of Sisyphus , there is evidence to support the notions that, firstly, Camus also identified these historical moments as obstacles to the practice of ascesis, and secondly, that he proceeded by orienting his own work toward overcoming these (...)
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  34. Gert Olthuis & Wim Dekkers (2005). Quality of Life Considered as Well-Being: Views From Philosophy and Palliative Care Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (4):307-337.score: 72.0
    The main measure of quality of life is well-being. The aim of this article is to compare insights about well-being from contemporary philosophy with the practice-related opinions of palliative care professionals. In the first part of the paper two philosophical theories on well-being are introduced: Sumner’s theory of authentic happiness and Griffin’s theory of prudential perfectionism. The second part presents opinions derived from interviews with 19 professional palliative caregivers. Both the well-being of patients and the well-being of the (...)
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  35. David Charles & Kathleen Lennon (eds.) (1992). Reduction, Explanation, and Realism. Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
    The contributors to this volume examine the motivations for anti-reductionist views, and assess their coherence and success, in a number of different fields, including moral and mental philosophy, psychology, organic biology, and the social sciences.
     
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  36. Charles Taylor (1985). Philosophy and the Human Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 72.0
    Charles Taylor has been one of the most original and influential figures in contemporary philosophy: his 'philosophical anthropology' spans an unusually wide range of theoretical interests and draws creatively on both Anglo-American and Continental traditions in philosophy. A selection of his published papers is presented here in two volumes, structured to indicate the direction and essential unity of the work. He starts from a polemical concern with behaviourism and other reductionist theories (particularly in psychology and the philosophy (...)
     
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  37. Stuart Glennan, Carl F. Craver and Lindley Darden: In Search of Mechanisms: Discoveries Across the Life Sciences.score: 71.0
    Carl Craver and Lindley Darden are two of the foremost proponents of a recent approach to the philosophy of biology that is often called the New Mechanism. In this book they seek to make available to a broader readership insights gained from more than two decades of work on the nature of mechanisms and how they are described and discovered. The book is not primarily aimed at specialists working on the New Mechanism, but rather targets scientists, students and teachers (...)
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  38. Frank W. Stahnisch (2005). Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Experimental Practice in Medicine and the Life Sciences. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (5):397-425.score: 71.0
    The aim of this paper is to discuss a key question in the history and philosophy of medicine, namely how scholars should treat the practices and experimental hypotheses of modern life science laboratories. The paper seeks to introduce some prominent historiographical methods and theoretical approaches associated with biomedical research. Although medical scientists need no convincing that experimentation has a significant function in their laboratory work, historians, philosophers, and sociologists long neglected its importance when examining changes in medical theories (...)
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  39. Robert Frodeman & Victor R. Baker (eds.) (2000). Earth Matters: The Earth Sciences, Philosophy, and the Claims of Community. Prentice Hall.score: 70.0
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  40. Jacob Kurian (1998). Life and Philosophy of Śrī Śaṅkara: A New Look on the Philosophical Dialogue Between East and West. Kant Publications.score: 70.0
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  41. Robert A. Wilson (2005). Genes and the Agents of Life: The Individual in the Fragile Sciences, Biology. Cambridge University Press.score: 69.0
    What are the agents of life? Central to our conception of the biological world is the idea that it contains various kinds of individuals, including genes, organisms, and species. How we conceive of these agents of life is central to our understanding of the relationship between life and mind, the place of hierarchical thinking in the biological sciences, and pluralistic views of biological agency. Genes and the Agents of Life rethinks the place of the individual (...)
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  42. Jan Baedke (2013). The Epigenetic Landscape in the Course of Time: Conrad Hal Waddington's Methodological Impact on the Life Sciences. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (4):756-773.score: 68.0
    It seems that the reception of Conrad Hal Waddington’s work never really gathered speed in mainstream biology. This paper, offering a transdisciplinary survey of approaches using his epigenetic landscape images, argues that (i) Waddington’s legacy is much broader than is usually recognized—it is widespread across the life sciences (e.g. stem cell biology, developmental psychology and cultural anthropology). In addition, I will show that (ii) there exist as yet unrecognized heuristic roles, especially in model building and theory formation, which (...)
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  43. Julian Baggini (2005). What's It All About?: Philosophy and the Meaning of Life. Oxford University Press.score: 67.0
    What is the meaning of life? It is a question that has intrigued the great philosophers--and has been hilariously lampooned by Monty Python. Indeed, the whole idea strikes many of us as vaguely pompous, a little absurd. Is there one profound and mysterious meaning to life, a single ultimate purpose behind human existence? In What's It All About?, Julian Baggini says no, there is no single meaning. Instead, Baggini argues meaning can be found in a variety of ways, (...)
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  44. Gerard A. J. M. Jagers op Akkerhuis (2010). Towards a Hierarchical Definition of Life, the Organism, and Death. Foundations of Science 15 (3):245-262.score: 67.0
    Despite hundreds of definitions, no consensus exists on a definition of life or on the closely related and problematic definitions of the organism and death. These problems retard practical and theoretical development in, for example, exobiology, artificial life, biology and evolution. This paper suggests improving this situation by basing definitions on a theory of a generalized particle hierarchy. This theory uses the common denominator of the “operator” for a unified ranking of both particles and organisms, from elementary particles (...)
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  45. Stephen P. Turner & Paul Andrew Roth (eds.) (2003). The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of the Social Sciences. Blackwell Pub..score: 67.0
    Presents a collection of essays that cover a variety of issues in the social sciences.
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  46. Andrew J. Pyle (1987). Animal Generation and the Mechanical Philosophy: Some Light on the Role of Biology in the Scientific Revolution. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 9 (2):225 - 254.score: 67.0
    In a recent paper, Keith Hutchison has advanced the thesis that the Mechanical Philosophy represents a shift towards supernaturalism in our conception of the physical world. This paper concentrates on one of the great problems of seventeenth-century biological theory — animal generation — to illustrate (and modify) Hutchison's thesis, thereby also serving to locate one role of the life sciences in the Scientific Revolution. This choice of focus enables us to draw heavily on Jacques Roger's seminal work (...)
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  47. Boaventura de Sousa Santos (ed.) (2007). Cognitive Justice in a Global World: Prudent Knowledges for a Decent Life. Lexington Books.score: 67.0
  48. Boaventura Sousa Santodes (ed.) (2007). Cognitive Justice in a Global World: Prudent Knowledges for a Decent Life. Lexington Books.score: 67.0
     
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  49. Kathleen Kuiper (ed.) (2010). The Ideas That Change the World: The Essential Guide to Modern Philosophy, Science, Math, and the Arts. Fall River Press/Britannica Educational Pub. In Association with Rosen Educational Services.score: 66.0
    The biological sciences -- Mathematics and the physical sciences -- The arts -- The social sciences, philosophy, and religion -- Politics and the law.
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  50. Friedrich von Schlegel (1847/1973). The Philosophy of Life, and Philosophy of Language, in a Course of Lectures. [New York,Ams Press.score: 66.0
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