Search results for 'Life sciences Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka, World Institute for Advanced Phenomenological Research and Learning & International Congress of Phenomenology/Philosophy and the Sciences Of Life (2002). The Creative Matrix of the Origins Dynamisms, Forces and the Shaping of Life. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  2. Monika Asztalos, John Emery Murdoch, Ilkka Niiniluoto & International Society for the Study of Medieval Philosophy (1990). Knowledge and the Sciences in Medieval Philosophy. Yliopistopaino.
     
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  3. Plamen L. Simeonov, Arran Gare, Seven M. Rosen & Denis Noble (forthcoming). Editorial. Special Issue on Integral Biomathics: Life Sciences, Mathematics and Phenomenological Philosophy. Journal Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 119 (2).
    The is the Editorial of the 2015 JPBMB Special Issue on Integral Biomathics: Life Sciences, Mathematics and Phenomenological Philosophy.
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  4.  2
    G. M. N. Verschuuren (1986). Investigating the Life Sciences: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science. Pergamon Press.
  5.  2
    Wim J. van der Steen (1993). A Practical Philosophy for the Life Sciences. State University of New York Press.
    Offers a practical philosophy of the life sciences, showing how scientific reasoning can, in limited contexts, be translated into the language of philosophy, and how science can correct the philosophy of science.
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  6. Catherine Kendig (2013). Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam's Historia Insectorum Generalis and the Case of the Water Flea. Science and Education 22 (8):1939-1961.
    Hasok Chang (Science & Education 20:317–341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science education. In this paper I describe the implementation of an integrated learning project that I initiated, organized, and structured to complement a course in history and philosophy of the life (...)
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  7.  28
    Miles MacLeod & Thomas A. C. Reydon (2013). Natural Kinds in Philosophy and in the Life Sciences: Scholastic Twilight or New Dawn? [REVIEW] Biological Theory 7 (2):89-99.
    This article, which is intended both as a position paper in the philosophical debate on natural kinds and as the guest editorial to this thematic issue, takes up the challenge posed by Ian Hacking in his paper, “Natural Kinds: Rosy Dawn, Scholastic Twilight.” Whereas a straightforward interpretation of that paper suggests that according to Hacking the concept of natural kinds should be abandoned, both in the philosophy of science and in philosophy more generally, we suggest that an alternative (...)
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  8.  6
    Cristina Chimisso (2013). The Life Sciences and French Philosophy of Science: Georges Canguilhem on Norms. In Hanne Andersen, Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao González, Thomas Uebel & Gregory Wheeler (eds.), New Challenges to Philosophy of Science. Springer Verlag 399--409.
    Although in the last decades increasingly more philosophers have paid attention to the life sciences, traditionally physics has dominated general philosophy of science. Does a focus on the life sciences and medicine produce a different philosophy of science and indeed a different conception of knowledge? Here Cristina Chimisso does not attempt to give a comprehensive answer to this question; rather, she presents a case study focussed on Georges Canguilhem. Canguilhem continued the philosophical tradition (...)
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  9.  4
    Wim J. Van der Steen (1998). Forging Links Between Philosophy, Ethics, and the Life Sciences: A Tale of Disciplines and Trenches. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20 (2):233 - 248.
    Philosophy of medicine and its daughter bioethics seldom undertake a critical analysis of live medical science. That is a serious shortcoming since some forms of bias in medical science have a negative impact on health care. Most notably, many areas of medicine focus on a restricted area of biology to the exclusion of ecology. Ecological thinking should lead to fundamental changes in medicine and the philosophy of medicine.
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  10.  6
    Michel Morange (2001). On the Relations Between History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences and Biology. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (1):65 - 74.
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  11. Christian J. Emden (2014). Nietzsche's Naturalism: Philosophy and the Life Sciences in the Nineteenth Century. Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores Nietzsche's philosophical naturalism in its historical context, showing that his position is best understood against the background of encounters between neo-Kantianism and the life sciences in the nineteenth century. Analyzing most of Nietzsche's writings from the late 1860s onwards, Christian J. Emden reconstructs Nietzsche's naturalism and argues for a new understanding of his account of nature and normativity. Emden proposes historical reasons why Nietzsche came to adopt the position he did; his genealogy of values and (...)
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  12.  6
    Ohad Nachtomy & Justin E. H. Smith (eds.) (2014). The Life Sciences in Early Modern Philosophy. OUP Usa.
    This volume explores the intersection between early modern philosophy and the life sciences by presenting the contributions of important but often neglected figures such as Cudworth, Grew, Glisson, Hieronymus Fabricius, Stahl, Gallego, Hartsoeker, and More, as well as familiar figures such as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Malebranche, and Kant.
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  13. Ohad Nachtomy & Justin E. H. Smith (eds.) (2014). The Life Sciences in Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press Usa.
    The present volume advances a recent historiographical turn towards the intersection of early modern philosophy and the life sciences by bringing together many of its leading scholars to present the contributions of important but often neglected figures, such as Ralph Cudworth, Nehemiah Grew, Francis Glisson, Hieronymus Fabricius ab Aquapendente, Georg Ernst Stahl, Juan Gallego de la Serna, Nicholas Hartsoeker, Henry More, as well as more familiar figures such as Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Malebranche, and Kant. The contributions to (...)
     
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  14. Wim J. Van der Steen (1998). Forging Links Between Philosophy, Ethics, and the Life Sciences: A Tale of Disciplines and Trenches. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20 (2):233-248.
     
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  15.  4
    A. L. Feeney & P. William Hughes (2015). Christian J. Emden, Nietzsche’s Naturalism: Philosophy and the Life Sciences in the Nineteenth Century. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 35 (5):252-255.
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  16. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka & World Institute for Advanced Phenomenological Research and Learning (1999). Life Scientific Philosophy, Phenomenology of Life and the Sciences of Life.
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  17.  69
    Sophia Connell (2003). Aristotle's Philosophy of Biology: Studies in the Origins of Life Sciences. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 54 (3):509-513.
  18.  9
    Elías Palti (1999). The "Metaphor of Life": Herder's Philosophy of History and Uneven Developments in Late Eighteenth-Century Natural Sciences. History and Theory 38 (3):322–347.
    The origins of the evolutionary concept of history have normally been associated with the development of an organicist notion of society. The meaning of this notion, in turn, has been assumed as something perfectly established and clear, almost self-evident. This assumption has prevented any close scrutiny of it. As this article tries to show, the idea of "organism" that underlies the emergence of the evolutionary concept of history, far from being "self-evident," has an intricate history and underwent a number of (...)
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  19.  4
    Lisa Shapiro & Karen Detlefsen (2003). Dennis Des Chene is Professor of Philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis. His Research Interests Are in Early Modern Philosophy and Sci-Ence, and He has Written on Natural Philosophy—Including Physics and the Life Sciences—in Late Scholastic and Cartesian Thought. [REVIEW] Perspectives on Science 11 (4).
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  20.  10
    Ann-Sophie Barwich & Alba Amilburu (2011). Bridging Disciplines? An Inquiry on the Future of Natural Kinds in Philosophy and the Life Sciences. Biological Theory 6 (2):187-190.
  21.  12
    Kevin D. Hoover (2013). History, Philosophy and Theory of the Life Sciences. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (3):316-331.
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  22.  7
    Pierre-Olivier Méthot, Miles MacLeod, Susanne Bauer, Fridolin Gross & Antonine Nicoglou (2010). Meeting Disciplinary Boundaries: Towards a More Inclusive Philosophy of the Life Sciences. Biological Theory (3):292-294.
  23. Tudor M. Baetu, Ann-Sophie Barwich, Daniel Brooks, Sébastien Dutreuil & Pierre-Luc Germain (2013). Model Thinking in the Life Sciences: Complexity in the Making: Second European Advanced Seminar in the Philosophy of the Life Sciences,“In Vivo, Ex Vivo, in Vitro, in Silico: Models in the Life Sciences” Hermance, Switzerland, 10–14 September 2012.(Meeting Report). [REVIEW] Biological Theory 8 (1):121 - 124.
     
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  24. Ann-Sophie Barwich & Alba Amilburu (2012). Bridging Disciplines? An Inquiry on the Future of Natural Kinds in Philosophy and the Life Sciences: Natural Kinds in Philosophy and in the Life Sciences: Scholastic Twilight or New Dawn? Granada, Spain, 7–9 September 2011 (Meeting Report). [REVIEW] Biological Theory 6 (2):187-190.
     
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  25. Philippe Huneman, Gérard Lambert & Marc Silberstein (eds.) (2014). History, Philosophy and Theory of the Life Sciences. Springer.
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  26. Susanne Lettow (ed.) (2014). Reproduction, Race, and Gender in Philosophy and the Early Life Sciences. State University of New York Press.
    _Investigates the impact of theories of reproduction and heredity on the emerging concepts of race and gender at the end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth centuries._.
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  27. Susanne Lettow (ed.) (2015). Reproduction, Race, and Gender in Philosophy and the Early Life Sciences. State University of New York Press.
    _Investigates the impact of theories of reproduction and heredity on the emerging concepts of race and gender at the end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth centuries._.
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  28. Gregg Mitman (1991). History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences by Mirko D. Grmek; Bernandino Fantini. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 82:288-289.
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  29. Antonine Nicoglou, Fridolin Gross, Susanne Bauer, Miles MacLeod & Pierre-Olivier Méthot (2010). Meeting Disciplinary Boundaries: Towards a More Inclusive Philosophy of the Life Sciences. Biological Theory 5 (3):292-294.
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  30. R. Skipper Jr, C. Allen, R. A. Ankeny, C. F. Craver, L. Darden, G. Mikkelson & R. Richardson (eds.) (forthcoming). Philosophy and the Life Sciences: A Reader. MIT Press.
  31. Mario Bunge (1986). Treatise on Basic Philosophy, vol. 7 : Epistemology and Methodology, III : « Philosophy of Science and Technology », Part I : « Formal and Physical Sciences », Part II : « Life Science, Social Science and Technology ». Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 176 (3):389-393.
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  32.  94
    Giovanni De Grandis & Sophia Efstathiou (2016). Grand Challenges and Small Steps. Introduction to the Special Issue 'Interdisciplinary Integration: The Real Grand Challenge for the Life Sciences?'. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 56:39-47.
    This collection addresses two different audiences: 1) historians and philosophers of the life sciences reflecting on collaborations across disciplines, especially as regards defining and addressing Grand Challenges; 2) researchers and other stakeholders involved in cross-disciplinary collaborations aimed at tackling Grand Challenges in the life and medical sciences. The essays collected here offer ideas and resources both for the study and for the practice of goal-driven cross-disciplinary research in the life and medical sciences. We organise (...)
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  33.  6
    Justin Garson (2015). Carl F. Craver and Lindley Darden. In Search of Mechanisms: Discoveries Across the Life Sciences. [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):180-83.
    Carl F. Craver and Lindley Darden’s new book, In Search of Mechanisms: Discoveries across the Life Sciences, is a fantastic and lucid introduction to the “new mechanism” tradition in the philosophy of science. Over the last 2 decades, but particularly since the turn of the century, this has become an influential framework for thinking about core problems in the history and philosophy of science, with a strong emphasis on biology. There are at least four major aims. (...)
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  34. Mark Kac (1972). Advances in the Physical and Life Sciences. Washington,American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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  35. Marie I. Kaiser (2011). The Limits of Reductionism in the Life Sciences. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 33 (4):453-476.
    In the contemporary life sciences more and more researchers emphasize the “limits of reductionism” (e.g. Ahn et al. 2006a, 709; Mazzocchi 2008, 10) or they call for a move “beyond reductionism” (Gallagher/Appenzeller 1999, 79). However, it is far from clear what exactly they argue for and what the envisioned limits of reductionism are. In this paper I claim that the current discussions about reductionism in the life sciences, which focus on methodological and explanatory issues, leave the (...)
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  36.  2
    Barbara Muraca (2014). Teleology and the Life Sciences: Between Limit Concept and Ontological Necessity. In Spyridon A. Koutroufinis (ed.), Life and Process: Towards a New Biophilosophy. De Gruyter 37-72.
    Against the background of the current discussion about self-organization theories and complexity theories and their application within biology and ecology, the question of teleology gains a new significance. Some scholars insist on the total elimination of any reference to teleology from the realm of the natural sciences. However, it seems especially hard to eradicate teleological expressions from scientific language when the issue of understanding living beings is at stake. For this reason, other scholars opt for a middle path that (...)
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  37.  9
    S. Müller-Wille (2012). Hans-Jorg Rheinberger: Temporality in the Life Sciences and Beyond. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 35 (1):5-7.
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  38. Paul Wood (ed.) (1995). Thomas Reid on the Animate Creation: Papers Relating to the Life Sciences. Penn State University Press.
    Best known as a moralist and one of the founders of the Scottish Common Sense school of philosophy, Thomas Reid was also an influential scientific thinker. Here his work on the life sciences is studied in detail, bringing together unpublished transcripts of his most important papers on natural history, physiology, and materialist metaphysics. Part I provides the first published account of Reid's reflections on the highly controversial theories surrounding muscular motion and the reproduction of plants and animals (...)
     
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  39.  14
    Frank W. Stahnisch (2005). Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Experimental Practice in Medicine and the Life Sciences. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (5):397-425.
    The aim of this paper is to discuss a key question in the history and philosophy of medicine, namely how scholars should treat the practices and experimental hypotheses of modern life science laboratories. The paper seeks to introduce some prominent historiographical methods and theoretical approaches associated with biomedical research. Although medical scientists need no convincing that experimentation has a significant function in their laboratory work, historians, philosophers, and sociologists long neglected its importance when examining changes in medical theories (...)
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  40.  11
    Stuart Glennan, Carl F. Craver and Lindley Darden: In Search of Mechanisms: Discoveries Across the Life Sciences.
    Carl Craver and Lindley Darden are two of the foremost proponents of a recent approach to the philosophy of biology that is often called the New Mechanism. In this book they seek to make available to a broader readership insights gained from more than two decades of work on the nature of mechanisms and how they are described and discovered. The book is not primarily aimed at specialists working on the New Mechanism, but rather targets scientists, students and teachers (...)
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  41.  64
    Jan Baedke (2013). The Epigenetic Landscape in the Course of Time: Conrad Hal Waddington’s Methodological Impact on the Life Sciences. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (4):756-773.
    It seems that the reception of Conrad Hal Waddington’s work never really gathered speed in mainstream biology. This paper, offering a transdisciplinary survey of approaches using his epigenetic landscape images, argues that (i) Waddington’s legacy is much broader than is usually recognized—it is widespread across the life sciences (e.g. stem cell biology, developmental psychology and cultural anthropology). In addition, I will show that (ii) there exist as yet unrecognized heuristic roles, especially in model building and (...)
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  42.  82
    Evan Thompson (2007). Mind in Life: Biology, Phenomenology, and the Sciences of Mind. Harvard University Press.
    The question has long confounded philosophers and scientists, and it is this so-called explanatory gap between biological life and consciousness that Evan ...
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  43.  44
    Robert A. Wilson (2012). Genes and the Agents of Life: The Individual in the Fragile Sciences Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    Genes and the Agents of Life undertakes to rethink the place of the individual in the biological sciences, drawing parallels with the cognitive and social sciences. Genes, organisms, and species are all agents of life but how are each of these conceptualized within genetics, developmental biology, evolutionary biology, and systematics? The book includes highly accessible discussions of genetic encoding, species and natural kinds, and pluralism above the levels of selection, drawing on work from across the biological (...)
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  44.  17
    Adrian Johnston & Catherine Malabou (2013). Self and Emotional Life: Philosophy, Psychoanalysis, and Neuroscience. Cup.
    <span class='Hi'>Adrian</span> <span class='Hi'>Johnston</span> and Catherine Malabou defy theoretical humanities' deeply-entrenched resistance to engagements with the life sciences. Rather than treat biology and its branches as hopelessly reductive and politically suspect, they view recent advances in neurobiology and its adjacent scientific fields as providing crucial catalysts to a radical rethinking of <span class='Hi'>subjectivity</span>. Merging three distinct disciplines--European philosophy from Descartes to the present, Freudian-Lacanian psychoanalysis, and affective neuroscience--<span class='Hi'>Johnston</span> and Malabou triangulate the emotional life of affective (...)
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  45.  1
    Jean Robillard (2006). PhilosoPhy of Communication: What Does It Have to Do with PhilosoPhy of Social Sciences. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 1 (2):245-260.
    As concepts, communication and information are very closely related, but they also designate more than their usual conceptual meaning when they are called upon in social theories as well as in philosophical theories about the reality and the truth of social life; information and communication are then designating physical events or event like objects of the observable reality, which will be hereafter described as a procedural ontologization of information. Why do they have this role and how do they play (...)
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  46. Justin E. H. Smith (2011). Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life. Princeton University Press.
    Though it did not yet exist as a discrete field of scientific inquiry, biology was at the heart of many of the most important debates in seventeenth-century philosophy. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the work of G. W. Leibniz. In Divine Machines, Justin Smith offers the first in-depth examination of Leibniz's deep and complex engagement with the empirical life sciences of his day, in areas as diverse as medicine, physiology, taxonomy, generation theory, and paleontology. He (...)
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  47.  2
    Pascal Michon (forthcoming). Rhythm as Meters, Cycles and Periods – Life Science, Metrics and Idealist Philosophy. Rhuthmos.
    Previous chapter In her book Die Form des Werdens: Eine Kulturgeschichte der Embryologie, 1760-1830, Janina Wellmann claims that around 1800 the concept of rhythm has emerged and penetrated the entire Western culture. In literature, in theoretical reflection on art, in philosophy, but especially in the newest life sciences, rhythm would have become a common scientific “Paradigm”, or better a new “Episteme”. It would be great if it is true. But I think this - Sur le concept de (...)
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  48.  49
    M. D. Grmek (2000). [Definition of the Real Domain of the History of Sciences and Exploring the Relationship with the Philosophy of Science]. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (1):5-12.
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  49. Christopher Hodgkinson (1996). Administrative Philosophy: Values and Motivations in Administrative Life. Pergamon.
  50.  7
    Mathias Grote (2010). Surfaces of Action: Cells and Membranes in Electrochemistry and the Life Sciences. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (3):183-193.
    The term ‘cell’, in addition to designating fundamental units of life, has also been applied since the nineteenth century to technical apparatuses such as fuel and galvanic cells. This paper shows that such technologies, based on the electrical effects of chemical reactions taking place in containers, had a far-reaching impact on the concept of the biological cell. My argument revolves around the controversy over oxidative phosphorylation in bioenergetics between 1961 and 1977. In this scientific conflict, a two-level mingling of (...)
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