Search results for 'Life support care Case studies' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Douglas N. Walton (1983). Ethics of Withdrawal of Life-Support Systems: Case Studies on Decision-Making in Intensive Care. Greenwood Press.score: 388.2
    " Journal of the American Medical Association "Walton has made a successful attempt to write about medical concerns without ever leaving the layperson to ...
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  2. Joseph R. DesJardins & Ernest Diedrich (2003). Learning What It Really Costs: Teaching Business Ethics with Life-Cycle Case Studies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (1):33-42.score: 158.4
    Sustainability informs the framework for a seminar that we teach for junior and senior undergraduates entitled "The Ethics and Economics of Sustainable Societies." One of the class requirements has each student research and write a life-cycle case study, an exercise in which they trace the full, or partial, life-cycle of some product with which they are familiar. Students are expected to examine the economic, ethical, and ecological implications along each step in the life-cycle of the product. (...)
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  3. M. Harris, A. P. Jagodzinski & K. R. Greene (2001). Roles for Knowledge-Based Computer Systems: Case Studies in Maternity Care. [REVIEW] AI and Society 15 (4):386-395.score: 125.0
    The design of medical knowledge-based computer systems requires effective interdisciplinary communication for the development of a community sharing common goals and a common language for design. Over the past 9 years the Perinatal Research Group, an interdisciplinary team of computer scientists, engineers and clinicians, have developed a prototype knowledge-based computer system to aid clinicians in the care of women in labour. The group were uncertain which approach to adopt to progress this system from a prototype to a useful clinical (...)
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  4. Mia Svantesson, Jan Karlsson, Pierre Boitte, Jan Schildman, Linda Dauwerse, Guy Widdershoven, Reidar Pedersen, Martijn Huisman & Bert Molewijk (2014). Outcomes of Moral Case Deliberation - the Development of an Evaluation Instrument for Clinical Ethics Support (the Euro-MCD). BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):30.score: 124.0
    Clinical ethics support, in particular Moral Case Deliberation, aims to support health care providers to manage ethically difficult situations. However, there is a lack of evaluation instruments regarding outcomes of clinical ethics support in general and regarding Moral Case Deliberation (MCD) in particular. There also is a lack of clarity and consensuses regarding which MCD outcomes are beneficial. In addition, MCD outcomes might be context-sensitive. Against this background, there is a need for a standardised (...)
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  5. Thomas S. Huddle & F. Amos Bailey (2012). Pacemaker Deactivation: Withdrawal of Support or Active Ending of Life? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (6):421-433.score: 117.0
    In spite of ethical analyses assimilating the palliative deactivation of pacemakers to commonly accepted withdrawings of life-sustaining therapy, many clinicians remain ethically uncomfortable with pacemaker deactivation at the end of life. Various reasons have been posited for this discomfort. Some cardiologists have suggested that reluctance to deactivate pacemakers may stem from a sense that the pacemaker has become part of the patient’s “self.” The authors suggest that Daniel Sulmasy is correct to contend that any such identification of the (...)
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  6. Peter Lewis (2007). Portrait of the Patient as a Young Man: An Exploration of the Use of Photographs in Hospital. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (1):51-55.score: 117.0
    The display of personal photographs in hospital is a common practice that has yet to be rigorously examined. The photographs displayed are subject to interpretation by the viewer and may lead to misunderstandings or miscommunication if clarification of meaning is not sought. This paper explores a range of possible meanings that the display of photographs in hospital may hold, based on a case study of a 15 year old boy hospitalised with a life threatening illness. Further research is (...)
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  7. Carmel M. Martin, Deirdre Grady, Susan Deaconking, Catherine McMahon, Atieh Zarabzadeh & Brendan O'Shea (2011). Complex Adaptive Chronic Care – Typologies of Patient Journey: A Case Study. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (3):520-524.score: 106.2
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  8. B. S. Edwards (1989). Withdrawal of Life Support Against Family Wishes: Is It Justified? A Case Study. Journal of Clinical Ethics 1 (1):74-9.score: 105.6
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  9. Iqbal H. Jaffer & Shabbir M. H. Alibhai (2008). The Permissibility of Organ Donation, End-of-Life Care, and Autopsy in Shiite Islam: A Case Study. In Jonathan E. Brockopp & Thomas Eich (eds.), Muslim Medical Ethics: From Theory to Practice. University of South Carolina Press.score: 103.2
     
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  10. Lori A. Roscoe (2012). Healing the Physician's Story: A Case Study in Narrative Medicine and End–of–Life Care. Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 2 (1):65-72.score: 103.2
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  11. Alison Shaw (2012). 'They Say Islam has a Solution for Everything, so Why Are There No Guidelines for This?' Ethical Dilemmas Associated with the Births and Deaths of Infants with Fatal Abnormalities From a Small Sample of Pakistani Muslim Couples in Britain. Bioethics 26 (9):485-492.score: 102.6
    This paper presents ethical dilemmas concerning the termination of pregnancy, the management of childbirth, and the withdrawal of life-support from infants in special care, for a small sample of British Pakistani Muslim parents of babies diagnosed with fatal abnormalities. Case studies illustrating these dilemmas are taken from a qualitative study of 66 families of Pakistani origin referred to a genetics clinic in Southern England. The paper shows how parents negotiated between the authoritative knowledge of their (...)
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  12. Robert C. Goldbort (1995). “How Dare You Sport Thus with Life?”: Frankensteinian Fictions as Case Studies in Scientific Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 16 (2):79-91.score: 97.8
    Fictional scenarios involving “hard” science offer what are in effect case studies of scientific ethics. From his analysis of Shelley's novel, biologist Leonard Isaacs constructed a model of a “Frankenstein scenario,” applicable to the dilemmas posed by the advancement of science in our time, as well as to fiction about science by such contemporary writers as Robin Cook and Michael Crichton. The special contribution of fiction to the study of ethics is that it both reflects and evaluates reality's (...)
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  13. Bernard Lo [ (2006). The Wendland Case, Withdrawing Life Support From Incompetent Patients Who Are Not Terminally Ill. In Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.), The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics at the End of Life. Prometheus Books.score: 96.6
     
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  14. Baruch A. Brody (1988). Life and Death Decision Making. Oxford University Press.score: 93.6
    Integrating theory with case studies, this book examines the practical application of moral theory in clinical decision-making through 40 composite cases based on actual clinical experience. Complex, realistic, and challenging, these examples contain the multiplicity of factors faced in clinical crises, making this a superb exploration of the ways in which theory relates to actual life-or-death situations.
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  15. Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.) (2006). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics at the End of Life. Prometheus Books.score: 93.6
     
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  16. Greer Donley & Marion Danis (2011). Making the Case for Talking to Patients About the Costs of End-of-Life Care. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):183-193.score: 93.0
    Costs at the end of life disproportionately contribute to health care costs in the United States. Addressing these costs will therefore be an important component in making the U.S. health care system more financially sustainable. In this paper, we explore the moral justifications for having discussions of end-of-life costs in the doctor-patient encounter as part of an effort to control costs. As health care costs are partly shared through pooled resources, such as insurance and taxation, (...)
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  17. Nancy N. Dubler (1993). Ethics on Call: Taking Charge of Life-and-Death Choices in Today's Health Care System. Vintage Books.score: 92.4
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  18. William G. Hoy (forthcoming). Kenneth J. Doka, Amy S. Tucci, Charles A. Corr, and Bruce Jennings (Eds): End-of-Life Ethics: A Case Study Approach. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-5.score: 90.6
    As readers of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics undoubtedly know, edited books can be highly uneven in their quality, with some chapters excelling in content, depth, and readability while others languish in mediocrity. Volumes in an annually issued series run an even greater risk of suffering the plague of inferiority, especially after many years of fame and success. End-of-Life Ethics: A Case Study Approach clearly overcomes these maladies and provides readers with an excellent collection of well-written, thought-provoking essays.The Hospice (...)
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  19. John E. Thomas, Wilfrid J. Waluchow & Elisabeth Gedge (eds.) (2014). Well and Good, Fourth Edition: Case Studies in Health Care Ethics. Broadview Press.score: 90.6
    Well and Good presents a combination of "classic" and little-known cases in health care ethics. These cases, accompanied by information about the major ethical theories, give students a chance to grapple with the ethical challenges faced by health care practitioners, policy makers, and recipients. The authors' narrative style and leading questions provoke student interest and engagement, while allowing instructors the freedom to draw from the theoretical perspectives they consider most useful. This fourth edition includes an expanded discussion of (...)
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  20. Casper Bruun Jensen (2008). Power, Technology and Social Studies of Health Care: An Infrastructural Inversion. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (4):355-374.score: 90.4
    Power, dominance, and hierarchy are prevalent analytical terms in social studies of health care. Power is often seen as residing in medical structures, institutions, discourses, or ideologies. While studies of medical power often draw on Michel Foucault, this understanding is quite different from his proposal to study in detail the “strategies, the networks, the mechanisms, all those techniques by which a decision is accepted” [Foucault, M. (1988). In Politics, philosophy, culture: Interviews and other writings 1977–84 (pp. 96–109). (...)
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  21. Robert M. Veatch (2008). Case Studies in Pharmacy Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 88.8
    Every pharmacist, aware or not, is constantly making ethical choices. Sometimes these choices are dramatic, life-and-death decisions, but often they will be more subtle, less conspicuous choices that are nonetheless important. Assisted suicide, conscientious refusal, pain management, equitable and efficacious distribution of drug resources within institutions and managed care plans, confidentiality, and alternative and non-traditional therapies are among the issues that are of unique concern to pharmacists. One way of seeing the implications of such issues and the moral (...)
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  22. Adel Saadoun, Jean-Louis Ermine, Claude Belair & Jean-Mark Pouyot (1997). A Knowledge Engineering Framework for Intelligent Retrieval of Legal Case Studies. Artificial Intelligence and Law 5 (3):179-205.score: 88.8
    Juris-Data is one of the largest case-study base in France. The case studies are indexed by legal classification elaborated by the Juris-Data Group. Knowledge engineering was used to design an intelligent interface for information retrieval based on this classification. The aim of the system is to help users find the case-study which is the most relevant to their own.The approach is potentially very useful, but for standardising it for other legal document bases it is necessary to (...)
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  23. Bert Molewijk, Dick Kleinlugtenbelt, Scott Pugh & Guy Widdershoven (2011). Emotions and Clinical Ethics Support. A Moral Inquiry Into Emotions in Moral Case Deliberation. HEC Forum 23 (4):257-268.score: 87.0
    Emotions play an important part in moral life. Within clinical ethics support (CES), one should take into account the crucial role of emotions in moral cases in clinical practice. In this paper, we present an Aristotelian approach to emotions. We argue that CES can help participants deal with emotions by fostering a joint process of investigation of the role of emotions in a case. This investigation goes beyond empathy with and moral judgment of the emotions of the (...)
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  24. K. J. Korfiatis & G. P. Stamou (1994). Emergence of New Fields in Ecology: The Case of Life History Studies. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (1):97 - 116.score: 87.0
    We examine the emergence of the field of life-history strategies during the 1950s. (We consider a 'field' an area of scientific activity consisting of a theoretical core, a subject of research, a vocabulary and research tools). During the late 1940s and early 1950s, population ecology faced many problems, concerning its conceptual framework, its mathematical models, experimental deficiencies, etc. Research on life-history characteristics remained descriptive, lacking explanations about the causes and significance of phenomena. This was due to the deficiencies (...)
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  25. Sara Irisdotter Aldenmyr (2012). Moral Aspects of Therapeutic Education: A Case Study of Life Competence Education in Swedish Education. Journal of Moral Education 41 (1):23-37.score: 86.6
    Educational philosophers and sociologists have pointed out the potential risks of an educational trend of therapy, which seems to have connotations with Western macro-discourses of individualisation, popularised psychology and privatisation of the public room. The overall purpose of this article is to discuss potential risks and possibilities regarding moral aspects of therapeutic approaches in education from a teacher perspective. I will present the non-mandatory Swedish topic Livskunskap, life competence education (LCE), in a case study in the field of (...)
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  26. E. Gedge, M. Giacomini & D. Cook (2007). Withholding and Withdrawing Life Support in Critical Care Settings: Ethical Issues Concerning Consent. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (4):215-218.score: 84.6
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  27. Nicolas Porta & Joel Frader (2007). Withholding Hydration and Nutrition in Newborns. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (5):443-451.score: 84.6
    In the twenty-first century, decisions to withhold or withdraw life-supporting measures commonly precede death in the neonatal intensive care unit without major ethical controversy. However, caregivers often feel much greater turmoil with regard to stopping medical hydration and nutrition than they do when considering discontinuation of mechanical ventilation or circulatory support. Nevertheless, forgoing medical fluids and food represents a morally acceptable option as part of a carefully developed palliative care plan considering the infant’s prognosis and the (...)
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  28. Michael A. DeVita & James V. Snyder (1993). Development of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Policy for the Care of Terminally Ill Patients Who May Become Organ Donors After Death Following the Removal of Life Support. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 3 (2):131-143.score: 84.6
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  29. J. P. Freer, R. D. Truog, J. C. Fackler, W. G. Bartholme & H. Morgan (1992). Brain Death and the Termination of Life Support: Case and Analysis. Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (1):78.score: 84.6
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  30. Lachlan Forrow, Norman Daniels & James E. Sabin (forthcoming). Case Studies: When Is Home Care Medically Necessary? Hastings Center Report.score: 84.6
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  31. Saving Lom Birth Weight Babies-at (forthcoming). Dr. Robert Young Reader of Philosophy, La Trobe University Technological Developments Which Have Enabled More Sophisticated Life Support Systems to Be Used in the Care of Neonates Have Profoundly Changed the Likelihood of Survival of Very Low Birthweight Infants. It. The Tiniest Newborns: Survival-What Price?.score: 84.6
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  32. Kalevi Kull, Claus Emmeche & Donald Favareau (2008). Biosemiotic Questions. Biosemiotics 1 (1):41-55.score: 84.6
    This paper examines the biosemiotic approach to the study of life processes by fashioning a series of questions that any worthwhile semiotic study of life should ask. These questions can be understood simultaneously as: (1) questions that distinguish a semiotic biology from a non-semiotic (i.e., reductionist–physicalist) one; (2) questions that any student in biosemiotics should ask when doing a case study; and (3) still currently unanswered questions of biosemiotics. In addition, some examples of previously undertaken biosemiotic (...) studies are examined so as to suggest a broad picture of how such a biosemiotic approach to biology might be done. (shrink)
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  33. Mark D. Siegel & Stanley H. Rosenbaum (2010). Withholding and Withdrawing Life Support in the Intensive Care Unit. In G. A. van Norman, S. Jackson, S. H. Rosenbaum & S. K. Palmer (eds.), Clinical Ethics in Anesthesiology. Cambridge University Press. 97.score: 84.6
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  34. J. Spike (1998). Physicians' Responsibilities in the Care of Suicidal Patients: Three Case Studies. Journal of Clinical Ethics 9 (3):306.score: 84.6
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  35. A. Baumann, G. Audibert, C. G. Lafaye, L. Puybasset, P. -M. Mertes & F. Claudot (2013). Elective Non-Therapeutic Intensive Care and the Four Principles of Medical Ethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):139-142.score: 84.0
    The chronic worldwide lack of organs for transplantation and the continuing improvement of strategies for in situ organ preservation have led to renewed interest in elective non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors. Two types of situation may be eligible for elective intensive care: patients definitely evolving towards brain death and patients suitable as controlled non-heart beating organ donors after life-supporting therapies have been assessed as futile and withdrawn. Assessment of the ethical acceptability and the risks of these strategies (...)
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  36. R. J. Jox, A. Schaider, G. Marckmann & G. D. Borasio (2012). Medical Futility at the End of Life: The Perspectives of Intensive Care and Palliative Care Clinicians. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (9):540-545.score: 84.0
    Objectives Medical futility at the end of life is a growing challenge to medicine. The goals of the authors were to elucidate how clinicians define futility, when they perceive life-sustaining treatment (LST) to be futile, how they communicate this situation and why LST is sometimes continued despite being recognised as futile. Methods The authors reviewed ethics case consultation protocols and conducted semi-structured interviews with 18 physicians and 11 nurses from adult intensive and palliative care units at (...)
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  37. Paul E. Morrissey (2012). The Case for Kidney Donation Before End-of-Life Care. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):1-8.score: 84.0
    Donation after cardiac death (DCD) is associated with many problems, including ischemic injury, high rates of delayed allograft function, and frequent organ discard. Furthermore, many potential DCD donors fail to progress to asystole in a manner that would enable safe organ transplantation and no organs are recovered. DCD protocols are based upon the principle that the donor must be declared dead prior to organ recovery. A new protocol is proposed whereby after a donor family agrees to withdrawal of life-sustaining (...)
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  38. Saskia M. Tuijn, Huub van den Bergh, Paul Robben & Frans Janssens (forthcoming). Experimental Studies to Improve the Reliability and Validity of Regulatory Judgments on Health Care in the Netherlands: A Randomized Controlled Trial and Before and After Case Study. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice:n/a-n/a.score: 82.2
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  39. C. Wayne Mayhall (2007). Review of Timothy E. Quill and Margaret P. Battin (Eds.), Physician-Assisted Dying: The Case for Palliative Care & Patient Care and Kathleen Foley and Herbert Hendin (Eds.), The Case Against Assisted Suicide: For the Right to End-of-Life Care. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 7 (11):48-50.score: 81.0
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  40. Sarah Barclay (2010). Clinical Ethics Committee Case 12: Our Adolescent Patient has a Progressive Life-Limiting Condition and Impaired Communication Skills – How Should Decisions About Her Care Be Made? Clinical Ethics 5 (4):175-179.score: 81.0
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  41. Bernard Lo (1995). End‐of‐Life Care After Termination of SUPPORT. Hastings Center Report 25 (6):6-8.score: 81.0
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  42. Jane I. Maddox (forthcoming). The Only People Involved in This Case Were the Nurse Practitioner, Nurses, the Neonatologist, the Mom and the Grandmother. She Was a Young, Single, Competent Person Who Seemed to Have Good Support From Her Own Mother. The Grandmother Always Came with the Young Mother Whenever She Came to Visit The Ethical Issues Presented in This Case Are: Should the Quality of Life Be An. Bioethics.score: 81.0
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  43. S. Dam, T. A. Abma, M. J. M. Kardol & G. A. M. Widdershoven (2012). “Here's My Dilemma”. Moral Case Deliberation as a Platform for Discussing Everyday Ethics in Elderly Care. Health Care Analysis 20 (3):250-267.score: 80.0
    Our study presents an overview of the issues that were brought forward by participants of a moral case deliberation (MCD) project in two elderly care organizations. The overview was inductively derived from all case descriptions (N = 202) provided by participants of seven mixed MCD groups, consisting of care providers from various professional backgrounds, from nursing assistant to physician. The MCD groups were part of a larger MCD project within two care institutions (residential homes and (...)
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  44. S. Van der Dam, T. A. Abma, M. J. M. Kardol & G. A. M. Widdershoven (2012). “Here's My Dilemma”. Moral Case Deliberation as a Platform for Discussing Everyday Ethics in Elderly Care. Health Care Analysis 20 (3):250-267.score: 80.0
    Our study presents an overview of the issues that were brought forward by participants of a moral case deliberation (MCD) project in two elderly care organizations. The overview was inductively derived from all case descriptions (N = 202) provided by participants of seven mixed MCD groups, consisting of care providers from various professional backgrounds, from nursing assistant to physician. The MCD groups were part of a larger MCD project within two care institutions (residential homes and (...)
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  45. Sarah B. Laditka & Margaret M. Houck (2006). Student-Developed Case Studies: An Experiential Approach for Teaching Ethics in Management. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 64 (2):157 - 167.score: 79.2
    To prepare for ethically challenging situations in the workplace, it is useful for students to explore their attitudes toward ethical issues and their own value systems. An experiential assignment to teach ethics in business programs is presented. This method allows instructors to incorporate a “stand alone” assignment in ethics into a course that focuses on another area in management. The assignment, student-developed case studies of ethical situations in the workplace, requires students to develop individual case studies (...)
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  46. Julie A. B. Cagle & Melissa S. Baucus (2006). Case Studies of Ethics Scandals: Effects on Ethical Perceptions of Finance Students. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 64 (3):213 - 229.score: 79.2
    Ethics instructors often use cases to help students understand ethics within a corporate context, but we need to know more about the impact a case-based pedagogy has on students’ ability to make ethical decisions. We used a pre- and post-test methodology to assess the effect of using cases to teach ethics in a finance course. We also wanted to determine whether recent corporate ethics scandals might have impacted students’ perceptions of the importance and prevalence of ethics in business, so (...)
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  47. Mary S. Morgan (2012). Case Studies: One Observation or Many? Justification or Discovery? Philosophy of Science 79 (5):667-677.score: 79.2
    Critiques of case studies as an epistemic genre usually focus on the domain of justification and hinge on comparisons with statistics and laboratory experiments. In this domain, case studies can be defended by the notion of “infirming”: they use many different bits of evidence, each of which may independently “infirm” the account. Yet their efficacy may be more powerful in the domain of discovery, in which these same different bits of evi- dence must be fully integrated (...)
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  48. Manuel Guillén & Tomás F. González (2001). The Ethical Dimension of Managerial Leadership Two Illustrative Case Studies in TQM. Journal of Business Ethics 34 (3-4):175 - 189.score: 79.2
    In recent decades, Total Quality Management (TQM) has become an important phenomenon in the world of business, but the implications and scope of quality programs are quite different everywhere. Since different explanations have been given, most authors agree that management commitment and leadership are indispensable elements for a successful TQM implementation. Nevertheless, the study of the literature reflects a terminological confusion on this point. The authors of this paper argue that commitment and leadership are not synonymous terms.While committed managers may (...)
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  49. Christine Ceci (2006). 'What She Says She Needs Doesn't Make a Lot of Sense': Seeing and Knowing in a Field Study of Home-Care Case Management. Nursing Philosophy 7 (2):90-99.score: 78.6
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  50. Lois L. Shepherd (2009). If That Ever Happens to Me: Making Life and Death Decisions After Terri Schiavo. University of North Carolina Press.score: 78.6
    Disorders of consciousness and the permanent vegetative state -- Legal and political wrangling over Terri's life -- In context--law and ethics -- Terri's wishes -- The limits of evidence -- The implications of surrogacy -- Qualities of life -- Feeding -- The preservation of life -- Respect and care : an alternative framework.
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