Search results for 'Life support care Case studies' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Douglas N. Walton (1983). Ethics of Withdrawal of Life-Support Systems: Case Studies on Decision-Making in Intensive Care. Greenwood Press.score: 1941.0
    " Journal of the American Medical Association "Walton has made a successful attempt to write about medical concerns without ever leaving the layperson to ...
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  2. Alison Shaw (2012). 'They Say Islam has a Solution for Everything, so Why Are There No Guidelines for This?' Ethical Dilemmas Associated with the Births and Deaths of Infants with Fatal Abnormalities From a Small Sample of Pakistani Muslim Couples in Britain. Bioethics 26 (9):485-492.score: 513.0
    This paper presents ethical dilemmas concerning the termination of pregnancy, the management of childbirth, and the withdrawal of life-support from infants in special care, for a small sample of British Pakistani Muslim parents of babies diagnosed with fatal abnormalities. Case studies illustrating these dilemmas are taken from a qualitative study of 66 families of Pakistani origin referred to a genetics clinic in Southern England. The paper shows how parents negotiated between the authoritative knowledge of their (...)
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  3. Peter Lewis (2007). Portrait of the Patient as a Young Man: An Exploration of the Use of Photographs in Hospital. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (1):51-55.score: 510.6
    The display of personal photographs in hospital is a common practice that has yet to be rigorously examined. The photographs displayed are subject to interpretation by the viewer and may lead to misunderstandings or miscommunication if clarification of meaning is not sought. This paper explores a range of possible meanings that the display of photographs in hospital may hold, based on a case study of a 15 year old boy hospitalised with a life threatening illness. Further research is (...)
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  4. M. Harris, A. P. Jagodzinski & K. R. Greene (2001). Roles for Knowledge-Based Computer Systems: Case Studies in Maternity Care. [REVIEW] AI and Society 15 (4):386-395.score: 500.0
    The design of medical knowledge-based computer systems requires effective interdisciplinary communication for the development of a community sharing common goals and a common language for design. Over the past 9 years the Perinatal Research Group, an interdisciplinary team of computer scientists, engineers and clinicians, have developed a prototype knowledge-based computer system to aid clinicians in the care of women in labour. The group were uncertain which approach to adopt to progress this system from a prototype to a useful clinical (...)
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  5. Joseph R. DesJardins & Ernest Diedrich (2003). Learning What It Really Costs: Teaching Business Ethics with Life-Cycle Case Studies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (1):33-42.score: 475.2
    Sustainability informs the framework for a seminar that we teach for junior and senior undergraduates entitled "The Ethics and Economics of Sustainable Societies." One of the class requirements has each student research and write a life-cycle case study, an exercise in which they trace the full, or partial, life-cycle of some product with which they are familiar. Students are expected to examine the economic, ethical, and ecological implications along each step in the life-cycle of the product. (...)
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  6. Thomas S. Huddle & F. Amos Bailey (2012). Pacemaker Deactivation: Withdrawal of Support or Active Ending of Life? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (6):421-433.score: 468.0
    In spite of ethical analyses assimilating the palliative deactivation of pacemakers to commonly accepted withdrawings of life-sustaining therapy, many clinicians remain ethically uncomfortable with pacemaker deactivation at the end of life. Various reasons have been posited for this discomfort. Some cardiologists have suggested that reluctance to deactivate pacemakers may stem from a sense that the pacemaker has become part of the patient’s “self.” The authors suggest that Daniel Sulmasy is correct to contend that any such identification of the (...)
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  7. Mia Svantesson, Jan Karlsson, Pierre Boitte, Jan Schildman, Linda Dauwerse, Guy Widdershoven, Reidar Pedersen, Martijn Huisman & Bert Molewijk (2014). Outcomes of Moral Case Deliberation - the Development of an Evaluation Instrument for Clinical Ethics Support (the Euro-MCD). BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):30.score: 418.0
    Clinical ethics support, in particular Moral Case Deliberation, aims to support health care providers to manage ethically difficult situations. However, there is a lack of evaluation instruments regarding outcomes of clinical ethics support in general and regarding Moral Case Deliberation (MCD) in particular. There also is a lack of clarity and consensuses regarding which MCD outcomes are beneficial. In addition, MCD outcomes might be context-sensitive. Against this background, there is a need for a standardised (...)
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  8. Eileen A. Joy (2013). Disturbing the Wednesday-Ish Business-as-Usual of the University Studium: A Wayzgoose Manifest. Continent 2 (4):260-268.score: 375.0
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
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  9. Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.) (2006). The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics at the End of Life. Prometheus Books.score: 374.4
     
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  10. Nancy N. Dubler (1993). Ethics on Call: Taking Charge of Life-and-Death Choices in Today's Health Care System. Vintage Books.score: 369.6
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  11. B. S. Edwards (1989). Withdrawal of Life Support Against Family Wishes: Is It Justified? A Case Study. Journal of Clinical Ethics 1 (1):74-9.score: 366.0
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  12. Carmel M. Martin, Deirdre Grady, Susan Deaconking, Catherine McMahon, Atieh Zarabzadeh & Brendan O'Shea (2011). Complex Adaptive Chronic Care – Typologies of Patient Journey: A Case Study. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (3):520-524.score: 364.8
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  13. Iqbal H. Jaffer & Shabbir M. H. Alibhai (2008). The Permissibility of Organ Donation, End-of-Life Care, and Autopsy in Shiite Islam: A Case Study. In Jonathan E. Brockopp & Thomas Eich (eds.), Muslim Medical Ethics: From Theory to Practice. University of South Carolina Press.score: 358.8
     
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  14. Lori A. Roscoe (2012). Healing the Physician's Story: A Case Study in Narrative Medicine and End–of–Life Care. Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 2 (1):65-72.score: 358.8
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  15. Robert M. Veatch (2008). Case Studies in Pharmacy Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 355.2
    Every pharmacist, aware or not, is constantly making ethical choices. Sometimes these choices are dramatic, life-and-death decisions, but often they will be more subtle, less conspicuous choices that are nonetheless important. Assisted suicide, conscientious refusal, pain management, equitable and efficacious distribution of drug resources within institutions and managed care plans, confidentiality, and alternative and non-traditional therapies are among the issues that are of unique concern to pharmacists. One way of seeing the implications of such issues and the moral (...)
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  16. Adel Saadoun, Jean-Louis Ermine, Claude Belair & Jean-Mark Pouyot (1997). A Knowledge Engineering Framework for Intelligent Retrieval of Legal Case Studies. Artificial Intelligence and Law 5 (3):179-205.score: 355.2
    Juris-Data is one of the largest case-study base in France. The case studies are indexed by legal classification elaborated by the Juris-Data Group. Knowledge engineering was used to design an intelligent interface for information retrieval based on this classification. The aim of the system is to help users find the case-study which is the most relevant to their own.The approach is potentially very useful, but for standardising it for other legal document bases it is necessary to (...)
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  17. R. J. Jox, A. Schaider, G. Marckmann & G. D. Borasio (2012). Medical Futility at the End of Life: The Perspectives of Intensive Care and Palliative Care Clinicians. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (9):540-545.score: 336.0
    Objectives Medical futility at the end of life is a growing challenge to medicine. The goals of the authors were to elucidate how clinicians define futility, when they perceive life-sustaining treatment (LST) to be futile, how they communicate this situation and why LST is sometimes continued despite being recognised as futile. Methods The authors reviewed ethics case consultation protocols and conducted semi-structured interviews with 18 physicians and 11 nurses from adult intensive and palliative care units at (...)
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  18. William G. Hoy (forthcoming). Kenneth J. Doka, Amy S. Tucci, Charles A. Corr, and Bruce Jennings (Eds): End-of-Life Ethics: A Case Study Approach. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-5.score: 317.2
    As readers of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics undoubtedly know, edited books can be highly uneven in their quality, with some chapters excelling in content, depth, and readability while others languish in mediocrity. Volumes in an annually issued series run an even greater risk of suffering the plague of inferiority, especially after many years of fame and success. End-of-Life Ethics: A Case Study Approach clearly overcomes these maladies and provides readers with an excellent collection of well-written, thought-provoking essays.The Hospice (...)
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  19. Bienke M. Janssen, Tine Van Regenmortel & Tineke A. Abma (2012). Balancing Risk Prevention and Health Promotion: Towards a Harmonizing Approach in Care for Older People in the Community. Health Care Analysis 22 (1):1-21.score: 307.0
    Many older people in western countries express a desire to live independently and stay in control of their lives for as long as possible in spite of the afflictions that may accompany old age. Consequently, older people require care at home and additional support. In some care situations, tension and ambiguity may arise between professionals and clients whose views on risk prevention or health promotion may differ. Following Antonovsky’s salutogenic framework, different perspectives between professionals and clients on (...)
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  20. Bienke M. Janssen, Tine Regenmortel & Tineke A. Abma (2012). Balancing Risk Prevention and Health Promotion: Towards a Harmonizing Approach in Care for Older People in the Community. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis (1):1-21.score: 307.0
    Many older people in western countries express a desire to live independently and stay in control of their lives for as long as possible in spite of the afflictions that may accompany old age. Consequently, older people require care at home and additional support. In some care situations, tension and ambiguity may arise between professionals and clients whose views on risk prevention or health promotion may differ. Following Antonovsky’s salutogenic framework, different perspectives between professionals and clients on (...)
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  21. Ruth Horn (2013). Euthanasia and End-of-Life Practices in France and Germany. A Comparative Study. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):197-209.score: 304.8
    The objective of this paper is to understand from a sociological perspective how the moral question of euthanasia, framed as the “right to die”, emerges and is dealt with in society. It takes France and Germany as case studies, two countries in which euthanasia is prohibited and which have similar legislation on the issue. I presuppose that, and explore how, each society has its own specificities in terms of practical, social and political norms that affect the ways in (...)
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  22. Sara Irisdotter Aldenmyr (2012). Moral Aspects of Therapeutic Education: A Case Study of Life Competence Education in Swedish Education. Journal of Moral Education 41 (1):23-37.score: 304.4
    Educational philosophers and sociologists have pointed out the potential risks of an educational trend of therapy, which seems to have connotations with Western macro-discourses of individualisation, popularised psychology and privatisation of the public room. The overall purpose of this article is to discuss potential risks and possibilities regarding moral aspects of therapeutic approaches in education from a teacher perspective. I will present the non-mandatory Swedish topic Livskunskap, life competence education (LCE), in a case study in the field of (...)
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  23. Reed Richter (1988). The Hastings Center and Euthanasia. The Euthanasia Review 3 (1):56-72.score: 302.4
    The Hasting Center's, "Guidelines on the Termination of Life-Sustaining Treatment and the Care of the Dying" (1987), outlines a position on assisted suicide that I argue is contradictory. On one hand the guidelines offers a position on human dignity and autonomy that accords competent patients the right to intentionally kill themselves by requesting doctors to terminate life-support. Yet, on the other hand, the guidelines argue that terminating life-support upon request is not ever the moral (...)
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  24. L. Kater, R. Houtepen, R. Vries & G. Widdershoven (2003). Health Care Ethics and Health Law in the Dutch Discussion on End-of-Life Decisions: A Historical Analysis of the Dynamics and Development of Both Disciplines. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (4):669-684.score: 293.6
    Over the past three or four decades, the concept of medical ethics has changed from a limited set of standards to a broad field of debate and research. We define medical ethics as an arena of moral issues in medicine, rather than a specific discipline. This paper examines how the disciplines of health care ethics and health care law have developed and operated within this arena. Our framework highlights the aspects of jurisdiction (Abbott) and the assignment of responsibilities (...)
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  25. Robert C. Goldbort (1995). “How Dare You Sport Thus with Life?”: Frankensteinian Fictions as Case Studies in Scientific Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 16 (2):79-91.score: 293.4
    Fictional scenarios involving “hard” science offer what are in effect case studies of scientific ethics. From his analysis of Shelley's novel, biologist Leonard Isaacs constructed a model of a “Frankenstein scenario,” applicable to the dilemmas posed by the advancement of science in our time, as well as to fiction about science by such contemporary writers as Robin Cook and Michael Crichton. The special contribution of fiction to the study of ethics is that it both reflects and evaluates reality's (...)
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  26. Bernard Lo [ (2006). The Wendland Case, Withdrawing Life Support From Incompetent Patients Who Are Not Terminally Ill. In Arthur L. Caplan, James J. McCartney & Dominic A. Sisti (eds.), The Case of Terri Schiavo: Ethics at the End of Life. Prometheus Books.score: 289.8
     
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  27. Jack Coulehan (2011). Deep Hope: A Song Without Words. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (3):143-160.score: 288.0
    Hope helps alleviate suffering. In the case of terminal illness, recent experience in palliative medicine has taught physicians that hope is durable and often thrives even in the face of imminent death. In this article, I examine the perspectives of philosophers, theologians, psychologists, clinicians, neuroscientists, and poets, and provide a series of observations, connections, and gestures about hope, particularly about what I call “deep hope.” I end with some proposals about how such hope can be sustained and enhanced at (...)
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  28. Baruch A. Brody (1988). Life and Death Decision Making. Oxford University Press.score: 280.8
    Integrating theory with case studies, this book examines the practical application of moral theory in clinical decision-making through 40 composite cases based on actual clinical experience. Complex, realistic, and challenging, these examples contain the multiplicity of factors faced in clinical crises, making this a superb exploration of the ways in which theory relates to actual life-or-death situations.
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  29. Greer Donley & Marion Danis (2011). Making the Case for Talking to Patients About the Costs of End-of-Life Care. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):183-193.score: 279.0
    Costs at the end of life disproportionately contribute to health care costs in the United States. Addressing these costs will therefore be an important component in making the U.S. health care system more financially sustainable. In this paper, we explore the moral justifications for having discussions of end-of-life costs in the doctor-patient encounter as part of an effort to control costs. As health care costs are partly shared through pooled resources, such as insurance and taxation, (...)
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  30. Jessica Price & Agnes Binagwaho (2010). From Medical Rationing to Rationalizing the Use of Human Resources for Aids Care and Treatment in Africa: A Case for Task Shifting. Developing World Bioethics 10 (2):99-103.score: 276.0
    With a global commitment to scaling up AIDS care and treatment in resource-poor settings for some of the most HIV-affected countries in Africa, availability of antiretroviral treatment is no longer the principal obstacle to expanding access to treatment. A shortage of trained healthcare personnel to initiate treatment and manage patients represents a more challenging barrier to offering life-saving treatment to all patients in need. Physician-centered treatment policies accentuate this challenge. Despite evidence that task shifting for nurse-centered AIDS patient (...)
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  31. Gillian Crozier, Acoustic Adaptation in Bird Songs: A Case Study in Cultural Selection.score: 273.6
    The greatest challenge for Cultural Selection Theory, which holds that Darwinian natural selection contributes to cultural evolution, lies is the paucity of evidence for structural mechanisms in cultural systems that are sufficient for adaptation by natural selection. In part, clarification is required with respect to the interaction between cultural systems and their purported selective environments. Edmonds, Hull, and others have argued that Cultural Selection Theory requires simple, conclusive, unambiguous case studies in order to meet this challenge. To this (...)
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  32. John E. Thomas, Wilfrid J. Waluchow & Elisabeth Gedge (eds.) (2014). Well and Good, Fourth Edition: Case Studies in Health Care Ethics. Broadview Press.score: 271.8
    Well and Good presents a combination of "classic" and little-known cases in health care ethics. These cases, accompanied by information about the major ethical theories, give students a chance to grapple with the ethical challenges faced by health care practitioners, policy makers, and recipients. The authors' narrative style and leading questions provoke student interest and engagement, while allowing instructors the freedom to draw from the theoretical perspectives they consider most useful. This fourth edition includes an expanded discussion of (...)
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  33. Casper Bruun Jensen (2008). Power, Technology and Social Studies of Health Care: An Infrastructural Inversion. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (4):355-374.score: 271.2
    Power, dominance, and hierarchy are prevalent analytical terms in social studies of health care. Power is often seen as residing in medical structures, institutions, discourses, or ideologies. While studies of medical power often draw on Michel Foucault, this understanding is quite different from his proposal to study in detail the “strategies, the networks, the mechanisms, all those techniques by which a decision is accepted” [Foucault, M. (1988). In Politics, philosophy, culture: Interviews and other writings 1977–84 (pp. 96–109). (...)
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  34. I. Miljeteig, K. A. Johansson, S. A. Sayeed & O. F. Norheim (2010). End-of-Life Decisions as Bedside Rationing. An Ethical Analysis of Life Support Restrictions in an Indian Neonatal Unit. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (8):473-478.score: 266.4
    Introduction Hundreds of thousands of premature neonates born in low-income countries are implicitly denied treatment each year. Studies from India show that treatment is rationed even for neonates born at 32 gestational age weeks (GAW), and multiple external factors influence treatment decisions. Is withholding of life-saving treatment for children born between 28 and 32 GAW acceptable from an ethical perspective? Method A seven-step impartial ethical analysis, including outcome analysis of four accepted priority criteria: severity of disease, treatment effect, (...)
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  35. Joseph Kaufert, Rhonda Wiebe, Karen Schwartz, Lisa Labine, Zana Marie Lutfiyya & Catherine Pearse (2010). End-of-Life Ethics and Disability: Differing Perspectives on Case-Based Teaching. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (2):115-126.score: 264.0
    The way in which medical professionals engage in bioethical issues ultimately reflects the type of care such patients are likely to receive. It is therefore critical for doctors and other health care professionals to have a broad understanding of disability. Our purpose in this paper is to explore ways of teaching bioethical issues to first year medical students by integrating alternative approaches. Such approaches include (a) the use of the narrative format, (b) the inclusion of a disability perspective, (...)
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  36. Bert Molewijk, Dick Kleinlugtenbelt, Scott Pugh & Guy Widdershoven (2011). Emotions and Clinical Ethics Support. A Moral Inquiry Into Emotions in Moral Case Deliberation. HEC Forum 23 (4):257-268.score: 261.0
    Emotions play an important part in moral life. Within clinical ethics support (CES), one should take into account the crucial role of emotions in moral cases in clinical practice. In this paper, we present an Aristotelian approach to emotions. We argue that CES can help participants deal with emotions by fostering a joint process of investigation of the role of emotions in a case. This investigation goes beyond empathy with and moral judgment of the emotions of the (...)
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  37. K. J. Korfiatis & G. P. Stamou (1994). Emergence of New Fields in Ecology: The Case of Life History Studies. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (1):97 - 116.score: 261.0
    We examine the emergence of the field of life-history strategies during the 1950s. (We consider a 'field' an area of scientific activity consisting of a theoretical core, a subject of research, a vocabulary and research tools). During the late 1940s and early 1950s, population ecology faced many problems, concerning its conceptual framework, its mathematical models, experimental deficiencies, etc. Research on life-history characteristics remained descriptive, lacking explanations about the causes and significance of phenomena. This was due to the deficiencies (...)
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  38. Alison Liebling (2004). Prisons and Their Moral Performance: A Study of Values, Quality, and Prison Life. OUP Oxford.score: 259.0
    This book constitutes a critical case study of the modern search for public sector reform. It includes a detailed account of a study aimed at developing a meaningful way of evaluating difficult-to-measure moral dimensions of the quality of prisons. -/- Penal practices, values, and sensibilities have undergone important transformations over the period 1990-2003. Part of this transformation included a serious flirtation with a liberal penal project that went wrong. A significant factor in this unfortunate turn of events was a (...)
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  39. Edwina Pio (2011). Relational Well-Being and Wealth: Māori Businesses and an Ethic of Care. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):153 - 169.score: 256.8
    Care is at the heart of the Maori values system, which calls for humans to be kaitiaki, caretakers of the maun y the life-force, in each other and in nature. The relational Five Well-beings approach, based on four case studies of Maori businesses, demonstrates how business can create spiritual, cultural, social, environmental and economic well-being. A Well-beings approach entails praxis, which brings values and practice together with the purpose of consciously creating well-being and, in so doing, (...)
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  40. P. Lilja Andersson, N. Juth, A. Petersen, C. Graff & A. -K. Edberg (2012). Ethical Aspects of Undergoing a Predictive Genetic Testing for Huntington's Disease. Nursing Ethics 20 (2):0969733012452686.score: 255.0
    The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of undergoing a presymptomatic genetic test for the hereditary and fatal Huntington’s disease, using a case study approach. The study was based on 18 interviews with a young woman and her husband from the decision to undergo the test, to receiving the results and trying to adapt to them, which were analysed using a life history approach. The findings show that the process of undergoing a presymptomatic test involves (...)
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  41. Petra Lilja Andersson, Niklas Juth, Åsa Petersén, Caroline Graff & Anna-Karin Edberg (2013). Ethical Aspects of Undergoing a Predictive Genetic Testing for Huntington's Disease. Nursing Ethics 20 (2):189-199.score: 255.0
    The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of undergoing a presymptomatic genetic test for the hereditary and fatal Huntington’s disease, using a case study approach. The study was based on 18 interviews with a young woman and her husband from the decision to undergo the test, to receiving the results and trying to adapt to them, which were analysed using a life history approach. The findings show that the process of undergoing a presymptomatic test involves (...)
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  42. Elizabeth Shirin Caldwell, Hongyan Lu & Thomas Harding (2010). Encompassing Multiple Moral Paradigms: A Challenge for Nursing Educators. Nursing Ethics 17 (2):189-199.score: 255.0
    Providing ethically competent care requires nurses to reflect not only on nursing ethics, but also on their own ethical traditions. New challenges for nurse educators over the last decade have been the increasing globalization of the nursing workforce and the internationalization of nursing education. In New Zealand, there has been a large increase in numbers of Chinese students, both international and immigrant, already acculturated with ethical and cultural values derived from Chinese Confucian moral traditions. Recently, several incidents involving Chinese (...)
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  43. Samuel M. Brown, C. Gregory Elliott & Robert Paine (2013). Withdrawal of Nonfutile Life Support After Attempted Suicide. American Journal of Bioethics: 13 (3):3 - 12.score: 254.0
    End-of-life decision making is fraught with ethical challenges. Withholding or withdrawing life support therapy is widely considered ethical in patients with high treatment burden, poor premorbid status, or significant projected disability even when such treatment is not ?futile.? Whether such withdrawal of therapy in the aftermath of attempted suicide is ethical is not well established in the literature. We provide a clinical vignette and propose criteria under which such withdrawal would be ethical. We suggest that it is (...)
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  44. Karen S. Thacker (2008). Nurses' Advocacy Behaviors in End-of-Life Nursing Care. Nursing Ethics 15 (2):174-185.score: 254.0
    Nursing professionals are in key positions to support end-of-life decisions and to advocate for patients and families across all health care settings. Advocacy has been identified as the common thread of quality end-of-life nursing care. The purpose of this comparative descriptive study was to reveal acute care nurses' perceptions of advocacy behaviors in end-of-life nursing practice. The 317 participating nurses reported frequent contact with dying patients despite modest exposure to end-of-life education. This (...)
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  45. E. Gedge, M. Giacomini & D. Cook (2007). Withholding and Withdrawing Life Support in Critical Care Settings: Ethical Issues Concerning Consent. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (4):215-218.score: 253.8
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  46. Nicolas Porta & Joel Frader (2007). Withholding Hydration and Nutrition in Newborns. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (5):443-451.score: 253.8
    In the twenty-first century, decisions to withhold or withdraw life-supporting measures commonly precede death in the neonatal intensive care unit without major ethical controversy. However, caregivers often feel much greater turmoil with regard to stopping medical hydration and nutrition than they do when considering discontinuation of mechanical ventilation or circulatory support. Nevertheless, forgoing medical fluids and food represents a morally acceptable option as part of a carefully developed palliative care plan considering the infant’s prognosis and the (...)
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  47. Michael A. DeVita & James V. Snyder (1993). Development of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Policy for the Care of Terminally Ill Patients Who May Become Organ Donors After Death Following the Removal of Life Support. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 3 (2):131-143.score: 253.8
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  48. J. P. Freer, R. D. Truog, J. C. Fackler, W. G. Bartholme & H. Morgan (1992). Brain Death and the Termination of Life Support: Case and Analysis. Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (1):78.score: 253.8
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  49. Lachlan Forrow, Norman Daniels & James E. Sabin (forthcoming). Case Studies: When Is Home Care Medically Necessary? Hastings Center Report.score: 253.8
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  50. Saving Lom Birth Weight Babies-at (forthcoming). Dr. Robert Young Reader of Philosophy, La Trobe University Technological Developments Which Have Enabled More Sophisticated Life Support Systems to Be Used in the Care of Neonates Have Profoundly Changed the Likelihood of Survival of Very Low Birthweight Infants. It. The Tiniest Newborns: Survival-What Price?.score: 253.8
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