Search results for 'Limitations and Alternatives' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2009). Limitations and Alternatives: Understanding Indian Philosophy. Calicut University Research Journal, ISSN No. 09723348 (1):47-58.score: 122.0
    This paper attempts to articulate certain inadequacies that are involved in the traditional way of categorizing Indian philosophy and explores alternative approaches, some of which otherwise are not explicitly seen in the treatises of the history of Indian Philosophies. By categorization, I mean, classifying Indian philosophy into two streams, which are traditionally called as astica and nastica or orthodox and heterodox systems. Further, these different schools in the astica Darsanas and nastica Darsanas are usually numbered into six and three respectively. (...)
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  2. David Livingstone Smith (2007). Interrogating the Westermarck Hypothesis: Limitations, Problems, and Alternatives. Biological Theory 2 (3):307-316.score: 72.0
  3. Antje S. Meyer (1992). Investigation of Phonological Encoding Through Speech Error Analyses: Achievements, Limitations, and Alternatives. Cognition 42 (1-3):181-211.score: 72.0
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  4. A. S. Meyer (1991). The Time Course of Phonological Encoding in Language Production: Phonological Encoding Inside the Syllable. Joumal of Memory and Language, 30, 69-89. Meyer, AS (1992). Investigation of Phonological Encoding Through Speech Error Analysis: Achievements, Limitations and Alternatives. [REVIEW] Cognition 42:181-212.score: 72.0
     
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  5. Frederik Herzberg (forthcoming). A Note on “The No Alternatives Argument” by Richard Dawid, Stephan Hartmann and Jan Sprenger. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-10.score: 54.0
    The defence of The No Alternatives Argument in a recent paper by R. Dawid, S. Hartmann and J. Sprenger (forthcoming in the British Journal for the Philosophy of Science; latest version: February 2013) rests on the assumption (among others) that the number of acceptable alternatives to a scientific hypothesis is independent of the complexity of the scientific problem. This note proves a generalisation of the main theorem by Dawid, Hartmann and Sprenger, where this independence assumption is no longer (...)
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  6. Scott Kretchmar (2007). Dualisms, Dichotomies and Dead Ends: Limitations of Analytic Thinking About Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (3):266 – 280.score: 42.0
    In this essay I attempt to show the limitations of analytic thinking and the kinds of dead ends into which such analyses may lead us in the philosophy of sport. As an alternative, I argue for a philosophy of complementation and compatibility in the face of what appear to be exclusive alternatives. This is a position that is sceptical of bifurcations and other simplified portrayals of reality but does not dismiss them entirely. A philosophy of complementation traffics in (...)
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  7. Frances Myrna Kamm (1987). The Insanity Defense, Innocent Threats, and Limited Alternatives. Criminal Justice Ethics 6 (1):61-76.score: 36.0
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  8. Justin Myers (2013). The Logic of the Gift: The Possibilities and Limitations of Carlo Petrini's Slow Food Alternative. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):405-415.score: 36.0
    The majority of literature on Slow Food focuses on the organization or actors involved in the movement. There is a dearth of material analyzing Carlo Petrini’s aspirations for Slow Food, particularly in light of his desire within Slow Food Nation (2007) and Terra Madre (2010) to make “freewill giving a part of economic discourse.” This essay corrects the literature gap through historicizing and critiquing Petrini’s alternative to global capitalism while rooting it in actually existing practices. First, Petrini’s problematic conceptualization of (...)
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  9. Guy Hawkins, Scott D. Brown, Mark Steyvers & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers (2012). Context Effects in Multi-Alternative Decision Making: Empirical Data and a Bayesian Model. Cognitive Science 36 (3):498-516.score: 34.0
    For decisions between many alternatives, the benchmark result is Hick's Law: that response time increases log-linearly with the number of choice alternatives. Even when Hick's Law is observed for response times, divergent results have been observed for error rates—sometimes error rates increase with the number of choice alternatives, and sometimes they are constant. We provide evidence from two experiments that error rates are mostly independent of the number of choice alternatives, unless context effects induce participants to (...)
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  10. Robin Jane Roff (2007). Shopping for Change? Neoliberalizing Activism and the Limits to Eating Non-GMO. Agriculture and Human Values 24 (4):511-522.score: 34.0
    While the cultivation of genetically modified organisms (GMO) and the spread of genetically engineered (GE) foods has gone largely unnoticed by the majority of Americans, a growing number of vocal civil society groups are opposing the technology and with it the entire conventional system of food provision. As with other alternative food movements, non-GMO activists focus on changing individual consumption habits as the best means of altering the practices of food manufacturers and thereby what and how food is produced. In (...)
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  11. Eckhart Arnold (2010). Can the Best-Alternative Justification Solve Hume's Problem? On the Limits of a Promising Approach. Philosophy of Science 77 (4):584-593.score: 32.0
    In a recent Philosophy of Science article Gerhard Schurz proposes meta-inductivistic prediction strategies as a new approach to Hume's. This comment examines the limitations of Schurz's approach. It can be proven that the meta-inductivist approach does not work any more if the meta-inductivists have to face an infinite number of alternative predictors. With his limitation it remains doubtful whether the meta-inductivist can provide a full solution to the problem of induction.
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  12. Federica Pazzaglia (2010). Are Alternative Organizational Forms the Solution to Limit Excessive Managerial Discretion? Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):623 - 639.score: 32.0
    Modern corporations have been widely accused of promoting values of managerial autonomy that can result in managerial waste and opportunistic behaviour, leading organizational theorists to suggest the adoption of alternative organizational forms that should normatively and structurally limit such autonomy. However, this mixed-methods study of an alternative organizational form — income trusts (1995—2005)— finds that income trusts were also characterized by excessive managerial autonomy. Managers strategically used the income trust form in discretionary ways such as by providing little information on (...)
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  13. Katherine E. Rowan (1994). The Technical and Democratic Approaches to Risk Situations: Their Appeal, Limitations, and Rhetorical Alternative. [REVIEW] Argumentation 8 (4):391-409.score: 32.0
    Because of the increasing number of “man-made” hazards in contemporary life, as well as the growing number of disastrous industrial accidents, interest in risk communication has burgeoned. Consequently, scholars and practitioners need to understand two of the more common responses to risk situations, the technical and democratic. This paper describes these two responses, identifies types of individuals likely to prefer each, and explains why, historically and sociologically, they are so intuitively compelling for many people. Arguing that both responses to risk (...)
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  14. Slobodan Perovic (2007). The Limitations of Kim's Reductive Physicalism in Accounting for Living Systems and an Alternative Nonreductionist Ontology. Acta Biotheoretica 55 (3).score: 30.0
    Jaegwon Kim’s exclusion argument is a general ontological argument, applicable to any properties deemed supervenient on a microproperty basis, including biological properties. It implies that the causal power of any higher-level property must be reducible to the subset of the causal powers of its lower-level properties. Moreover, as Kim’s recent version of the argument indicates, a higher-level property can be causally efficient only to the extent of the efficiency of its micro-basis. In response, I argue that the ontology that aims (...)
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  15. John Lowman & Ted Palys (2007). Strict Confidentiality: An Alternative to Pre's “Limited Confidentiality” Doctrine. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (2-4):163-177.score: 30.0
    In “Advisory Opinion on Confidentiality, Its Limits and Duties to Others” the Canadian Interagency Advisory Panel on Research Ethics (PRE) articulates a rationale for a priori limitations to research confidentiality, based largely on putative legal duties to violate confidentiality in certain circumstances. We argue that PRE promotes a “Law of the Land” doctrine of research ethics that is but one approach to resolving potential conflicts between law and research ethics. PRE emphasises risks that have never materialized, and ignores jurisprudence (...)
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  16. Richard B. Hovard (1971). Theoretical Reduction: The Limits and Alternatives to Reductive Methods in Scientific Explanation. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 1 (1):83-100.score: 30.0
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  17. Carol E. Cleland (2002). 'Turing Limit'. Some of Them (Steinhart, Copeland) Represent Extensions of Tur-Ing's Account, Whereas Others Defend Alternatives Notions of Effective Computability (Bringsjord and Zenzen, Wells). Minds and Machines 12:157-158.score: 30.0
  18. Laura B. DeLind (1986). The U.S. Farm Crisis: Program Responses and Alternatives to Them—the Case of Michigan. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 3 (4):59-65.score: 30.0
    The current crisis in U.S. agriculture has broadcast a rather simplex message. It is that the traditional family farm is in serious trouble. This message is apparent in the agricultural programs that have emerged in direct response to the farm crisis. Using Michigan's experience as illustration, these programs are shown to share similar objectives supported by a singular policy orientation. They utilize a ‘farm as firm’ model and treat the small farm operation as the unit of problem analysis and remedial (...)
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  19. Ruth Barcan (2008). Alternative Therapies as Disciplinary Practices : The Uses and Limitations of a Foucauldian Approach. In Nicole Anderson & Katrina Schlunke (eds.), Cultural Theory in Everyday Practice. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
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  20. Carlos Davidson (2000). Economic Growth and the Environment:Alternatives to the Limits Paradigm. Bioscience 50 (5):433.score: 30.0
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  21. David J. Hufford (2003). Evaluating Complementary and Alternative Medicine: The Limits of Science and of Scientists. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (2):198-212.score: 24.0
  22. Mikkel Gerken (2013). Epistemic Focal Bias. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (1):41 - 61.score: 24.0
    This paper defends strict invariantism against some philosophical and empirical data that have been taken to compromise it. The defence involves a combination of a priori philosophical arguments and empirically informed theorizing. The positive account of the data is an epistemic focal bias account that draws on cognitive psychology. It involves the assumption that, owing to limitations of the involved cognitive resources, intuitive judgments about knowledge ascriptions are generated by processing only a limited part of the available information?the part (...)
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  23. Carl T. Bergstrom & Peter Godfrey-Smith (1998). On the Evolution of Behavioral Complexity in Individuals and Populations. Biology and Philosophy 13 (2):205-31.score: 24.0
    A wide range of ecological and evolutionary models predict variety in phenotype or behavior when a population is at equilibrium. This heterogeneity can be realized in different ways. For example, it can be realized through a complex population of individuals exhibiting different simple behaviors, or through a simple population of individuals exhibiting complex, varying behaviors. In some theoretical frameworks these different realizations are treated as equivalent, but natural selection distinguishes between these two alternatives in subtle ways. By investigating an (...)
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  24. David J. Gunkel (2014). A Vindication of the Rights of Machines. Philosophy and Technology 27 (1):113-132.score: 24.0
    This essay responds to the machine question in the affirmative, arguing that artifacts, like robots, AI, and other autonomous systems, can no longer be legitimately excluded from moral consideration. The demonstration of this thesis proceeds in four parts or movements. The first and second parts approach the subject by investigating the two constitutive components of the ethical relationship—moral agency and patiency. In the process, they each demonstrate failure. This occurs not because the machine is somehow unable to achieve what is (...)
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  25. Ernest Sosa (1993). Review: Proper Functionalism and Virtue Epistemology. [REVIEW] Noûs 27 (1):51 - 65.score: 24.0
    Comprehensive and packed, Alvin Plantinga's two-volume treatise defies summary. The first volume, Warrant: Current Views, is a meticulous critical survey of epistemology today. Many current approaches are presented and exhaustively discussed, and a negative verdict is passed on each in turn. This prepares the way for volume two, Warrant and Proper Function, where a positive view is advanced and developed in satisfying detail. The cumulative result is most impressive, and should command attention for years to come. Here I cannot possibly (...)
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  26. Stefano Gualeni (2014). Augmented Ontologies or How to Philosophize with a Digital Hammer. Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):177-199.score: 24.0
    Could a person ever transcend what it is like to be in the world as a human being? Could we ever know what it is like to be other creatures? Questions about the overcoming of a human perspective are not uncommon in the history of philosophy. In the last century, those very interrogatives were notably raised by American philosopher Thomas Nagel in the context of philosophy of mind. In his 1974 essay What is it Like to Be a Bat?, Nagel (...)
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  27. Y. Michael Barilan & Moshe Weintraub (2001). Persuasion as Respect for Persons: An Alternative View of Autonomy and of the Limits of Discourse. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (1):13 – 34.score: 24.0
    The article calls for a departure from the common concept of autonomy in two significant ways: it argues for the supremacy of semantic understanding over procedure, and claims that clinicians are morally obliged to make a strong effort to persuade patients to accept medical advice. We interpret the value of autonomy as derived from the right persons have to respect, as agents who can argue, persuade and be persuaded in matters of utmost personal significance such as decisions about medical care. (...)
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  28. Stevan Harnad (1987). Category Induction and Representation. In [Book Chapter].score: 24.0
    A provisional model is presented in which categorical perception (CP) provides our basic or elementary categories. In acquiring a category we learn to label or identify positive and negative instances from a sample of confusable alternatives. Two kinds of internal representation are built up in this learning by "acquaintance": (1) an iconic representation that subserves our similarity judgments and (2) an analog/digital feature-filter that picks out the invariant information allowing us to categorize the instances correctly. This second, categorical representation (...)
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  29. Stanley A. Mulaik (1985). Exploratory Statistics and Empiricism. Philosophy of Science 52 (3):410-430.score: 24.0
    Exploratory statistics represents the transformation of a realist theory of statistics held by early nineteenth-century astronomers into an empiricist theory of statistics held by biometricians at the turn of the twentieth century. This paper discusses four key ideas in empiricist thought that influenced the form exploratory statistics took: (1) Baconianism, (2) associationism, (3) the search for cognitive calculi, and (4) phenomenalism. Some limitations of and alternatives to exploratory statistics as a hypothesis-generating methodology are discussed.
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  30. Arnulf Deppermann (2011). The Study of Formulations as a Key to an Interactional Semantics. Human Studies 34 (2):115-128.score: 24.0
    As an Introduction to the Special Issue on “Formulation, generalization, and abstraction in interaction,” this paper discusses key problems of a conversation analytic (CA) approach to semantics in interaction. Prior research in CA and Interactional Linguistics has only rarely dealt with issues of linguistic meaning in interaction. It is argued that this is a consequence of limitations of sequential analysis to capture meaning in interaction. While sequential analysis remains the encompassing methodological framework, it is suggested that it needs to (...)
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  31. Robyn Brothers (2000). The Computer-Mediated Public Sphere and the Cosmopolitan Ideal. Ethics and Information Technology 2 (2):91-97.score: 24.0
    In response to the attractive moral and politicalmodel of cosmopolitanism, this paper offers anoverview of some of the conceptual limitations to thatmodel arising from computer-mediated, interest-basedsocial interaction. I discuss James Bohman''sdefinition of the global and cosmopolitan spheres andhow computer-mediated communication might impact thedevelopment of those spheres. Additionally, I questionthe commitment to purely rational models of socialcooperation when theorizing a computer-mediated globalpublic sphere, exploring recent alternatives. Andfinally, I discuss a few of the political andepistemic constraints on participation in thecomputer-mediated (...)
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  32. Cei Maslen (2013). Keeping Score for Causal Claims: Causal Contextualism Applied to a Medical Case. Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (1):12-24.score: 24.0
    This article investigates how Causal Contextualism applies in a medical context. It is shown how the correct interpretation of some medical causal claims depends on relevant alternatives and then argued that these relevant alternatives are determined by standards of practice and practical limitations (of equipment, personnel, expertise, cost), amongst other factors. Causal Contextualism has recently been defended by a number of philosophers; however details of the relevant factors determining content in different contexts have been lacking. It seems (...)
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  33. Kenneth B. Peter (2002). Jefferson and the Independence of Generations. Environmental Ethics 24 (4):371-387.score: 24.0
    Thomas Jefferson’s argument against long-term debt and his theory of usufruct are used to show why each generation is obligated to protect the independence of future generations. This argument forms the theory of “Jeffersonian generational independence.” The theory has wide implications for the environmental movement because most environmental problems result in limitations on the liberty of future generations. I compare and defend Jeffersonian generational independence from two alternatives including the investment theory raised by James Madison and the problem (...)
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  34. Ronald Sandler (2005). Ignorance and Virtue. Philosophical Papers 34 (2):261-272.score: 24.0
    Julia Driver has argued that there is a class of virtues that are compatible with or even require that an agent be ignorant in some respect. In this paper I argue for an alternative conception of the relationship between ignorance and virtue. The dispositions constitutive of virtue must include sensitivity to human limitations and fallibility. In this way the virtues accommodate ignorance, rather than require or promote it. I develop my account by considering two virtues in particular: tolerance (the (...)
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  35. Ernest Sosa (1996). &Quot;proper Functionalism and Virtue Epistemology&Quot;. [REVIEW] In Jonathan L. Kvanvig (ed.), Warrant in Contemporary Epistemology. Lanham, Md: Rowman & Littlefield. 253-270.score: 24.0
    Comprehensive and packed, Alvin Plantinga's two-volume treatise defies sum- mary. The first volume, Warrant: Current Views, is a meticulous critical survey of epistemology today. Many current approaches are presented and exhaustively discussed, and a negative verdict is passed on each in turn. This prepares the way for volume two, Warrant and Proper Function, where a positive view is advanced and developed in satisfying detail. The cumulative result is most impressive, and should command attention for years to come. Here I cannot (...)
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  36. Carole J. Lee, Cassidy R. Sugimoto, Guo Zhang & Blaise Cronin (2013). Bias in Peer Review. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 64 (1):2-17.score: 24.0
    Research on bias in peer review examines scholarly communication and funding processes to assess the epistemic and social legitimacy of the mechanisms by which knowledge communities vet and self-regulate their work. Despite vocal concerns, a closer look at the empirical and methodological limitations of research on bias raises questions about the existence and extent of many hypothesized forms of bias. In addition, the notion of bias is predicated on an implicit ideal that, once articulated, raises questions about the normative (...)
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  37. Jeffrey M. Stibel, Itiel E. Dror & Talia Ben-Zeev (2009). The Collapsing Choice Theory: Dissociating Choice and Judgment in Decision Making. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 66 (2):149-179.score: 24.0
    Decision making theory in general, and mental models in particular, associate judgment and choice. Decision choice follows probability estimates and errors in choice derive mainly from errors in judgment. In the studies reported here we use the Monty Hall dilemma to illustrate that judgment and choice do not always go together, and that such a dissociation can lead to better decision-making. Specifically, we demonstrate that in certain decision problems, exceeding working memory limitations can actually improve decision choice. We show (...)
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  38. Roberto Torretti (2010). La proliferación de los conceptos de especie en la biología evolucionista (The proliferation of species concepts in evolutionary biology). Theoria 25 (3):325-377.score: 24.0
    RESUMEN: La biología evolucionista no ha logrado definir un concepto de especie que satisfaga a todos sus colaboradores. El presente panorama crítico de las principales propuestas y sus respectivas dificultades apunta, por un lado, a ilustrar los procesos de formación de conceptos en las ciencias empíricas y, por otro, a socavar la visión parateológica del conocimiento y la verdad que inspiró inicialmente a la ciencia moderna y prevalece aún entre muchas personas educadas. El artículo se divide en dos partes. La (...)
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  39. David Beetham (2009). Democracy: Universality and Diversity. Ethics and Global Politics 2 (4).score: 24.0
    The argument of this paper is that the justification of democracy’s core principles of popular control over government in conditions of political equality, and the defense of them against paternalist alternatives, requires appeal to basic features of political decision-making and of human nature, respectively*its capacities and limitations*which are universal in their scope, and do not stop at borders. It follows that if a democratic form of government is appropriate anywhere, it must be so everywhere, though differences of social (...)
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  40. Walter Edinger (1992). Which Opinion Should a Clinical Ethicist Give: Personal Viewpoint or Professional Consensus? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 13 (1).score: 24.0
    When clinical ethicists are called upon to give a recommendation regarding patient care, they may be faced with a dilemma of their own. If their own personal opinion is not widely shared, the ethicist will have three options. These include: (1) giving their own opinion; (2) giving the widely shared opinion; and (3) giving both opinions, leaving the physician to select which opinion to accept. The intentions of this article are to evaluate strengths and weaknesses of these three alternatives (...)
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  41. Moshe Weintraub & Y. Michael Barilan (2001). Persuasion as Respect for Persons: An Alternative View of Autonomy and of the Limits of Discourse. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (1):13-34.score: 24.0
  42. Peter Godfrey-Smith (1998). On the Evolution of Behavioral Heterogeneity in Individuals and Populations. Biology and Philosophy 13 (2):205-231.score: 24.0
    A wide range of ecological and evolutionary models predict variety in phenotype or behavior when a population is at equilibrium. This heterogeneity can be realized in different ways. For example, it can be realized through a complex population of individuals exhibiting different simple behaviors, or through a simple population of individuals exhibiting complex, varying behaviors. In some theoretical frameworks these different realizations are treated as equivalent, but natural selection distinguishes between these two alternatives in subtle ways. By investigating an (...)
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  43. Marcin Morzycki (2011). Metalinguistic Comparison in an Alternative Semantics for Imprecision. Natural Language Semantics 19 (1):39-86.score: 24.0
    This paper offers an analysis of metalinguistic comparatives such as more dumb than crazy in which they differ from ordinary comparatives in the scale on which they compare: ordinary comparatives use scales lexically determined by particular adjectives, but metalinguistic ones use a generally-available scale of imprecision or ‘pragmatic slack’. To implement this idea, I propose a novel compositional implementation of the Lasersohnian pragmatic-halos account of imprecision—one that represents clusters of similar meanings as Hamblin alternatives. In the theory that results, (...)
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  44. C. Gershenson (2014). Info-Computationalism or Materialism? Neither and Both. Constructivist Foundations 9 (2):241-242.score: 24.0
    Open peer commentary on the article “Info-computational Constructivism and Cognition” by Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic. Upshot: The limitations of materialism for studying cognition have motivated alternative epistemologies based on information and computation. I argue that these alternatives are also inherently limited and that these limits can only be overcome by considering materialism, info-computationalism, and cognition at the same time.
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  45. Paul Guyer (2008). Kant's Transcendental Idealism and the Limits of Knowledge : Kant's Alternative to Locke's Physiology. In Daniel Garber & Béatrice Longuenesse (eds.), Kant and the Early Moderns. Princeton University Press.score: 24.0
  46. Bill Maurer (2005). Mutual Life, Limited: Islamic Banking, Alternative Currencies, Lateral Reason. Princeton University Press.score: 24.0
    Based on fieldwork among Islamic bankers globally, this book questions the equivalence between money and ethnography and asks whether money can ever be adequate to the value backing it. "I enjoyed this book mightily.
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  47. Beverly I. Strassmann & Wendy M. Garrard (2011). Alternatives to the Grandmother Hypothesis. Human Nature 22 (1-2):201-222.score: 24.0
    We conducted a meta-analysis of 17 studies that tested for an association between grandparental survival and grandchild survival in patrilineal populations. Using two different methodologies, we found that the survival of the maternal grandmother and grandfather, but not the paternal grandmother and grandfather, was associated with decreased grandoffspring mortality. These results are consistent with the findings of psychological studies in developed countries (Coall and Hertwig Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33:1-59, 2010). When tested against the predictions of five hypotheses (confidence of (...)
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  48. Chris Wisniewski (2007). Political Culture Vs. Cultural Studies: Reply to Fenster. Critical Review 19 (1):125-145.score: 24.0
    ABSTRACT A review of two of the strands of cultural studies that Mark Fenster contends are superior to Murray Edelman?s analysis of mass public opinion?Gramsci?s theory of hegemony, and Bourdieu?s sociology?and a more general look at work in the field of cultural studies suggests that all of these alternatives suffer from severe theoretical and methodological limitations. Future studies of culture and politics need to pose questions similar to the ones that preoccupied Edelman, but they must move beyond the (...)
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  49. Petko Kusev & Paul van Schaik (2013). The Cognitive Economy: The Probabilistic Turn in Psychology and Human Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):294-295.score: 24.0
    According to the foundations of economic theory, agents have stable and coherent preferences that guide their choices among alternatives. However, people are constrained by information-processing and memory limitations and hence have a propensity to avoid cognitive load. We propose that this in turn will encourage them to respond to preferences and goals influenced by context and memory representations.
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  50. Tomas Mackevičius & Marius Rakštelis (2010). Realization of the Liberty Limitation Punishment (text only in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 122 (4):261-277.score: 24.0
    The article deals with a study of a distinct criminal punishment established in the Criminal Code and the Code of Punishment Enforcement of the Republic of Lithuania—restriction of liberty, as an alternative to imprisonment. Without investigating extensively the course of development of this penalty, in the article it is sought to overview the development trends of restriction of liberty; analyse the problems of enforcing this penalty and suggest measures to eliminate them; investigate whether the legal regulation of Lithuania is in (...)
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