Search results for 'Limitations and Alternatives' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2009). Limitations and Alternatives: Understanding Indian Philosophy. Calicut University Research Journal, ISSN No. 09723348 (1):47-58.score: 170.0
    This paper attempts to articulate certain inadequacies that are involved in the traditional way of categorizing Indian philosophy and explores alternative approaches, some of which otherwise are not explicitly seen in the treatises of the history of Indian Philosophies. By categorization, I mean, classifying Indian philosophy into two streams, which are traditionally called as astica and nastica or orthodox and heterodox systems. Further, these different schools in the astica Darsanas and nastica Darsanas are usually numbered into six and three respectively. (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. David Livingstone Smith (2007). Interrogating the Westermarck Hypothesis: Limitations, Problems, and Alternatives. Biological Theory 2 (3):307-316.score: 120.0
  3. Antje S. Meyer (1992). Investigation of Phonological Encoding Through Speech Error Analyses: Achievements, Limitations, and Alternatives. Cognition 42 (1-3):181-211.score: 120.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. A. S. Meyer (1991). The Time Course of Phonological Encoding in Language Production: Phonological Encoding Inside the Syllable. Joumal of Memory and Language, 30, 69-89. Meyer, AS (1992). Investigation of Phonological Encoding Through Speech Error Analysis: Achievements, Limitations and Alternatives. [REVIEW] Cognition 42:181-212.score: 120.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Frederik Herzberg (2014). A Note on “The No Alternatives Argument” by Richard Dawid, Stephan Hartmann and Jan Sprenger. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 4 (3):375-384.score: 66.0
    The defence of The No Alternatives Argument in a recent paper by R. Dawid, S. Hartmann and J. Sprenger (forthcoming in the British Journal for the Philosophy of Science; latest version: February 2013) rests on the assumption (among others) that the number of acceptable alternatives to a scientific hypothesis is independent of the complexity of the scientific problem. This note proves a generalisation of the main theorem by Dawid, Hartmann and Sprenger, where this independence assumption is no longer (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Frances Myrna Kamm (1987). The Insanity Defense, Innocent Threats, and Limited Alternatives. Criminal Justice Ethics 6 (1):61-76.score: 60.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Justin Myers (2013). The Logic of the Gift: The Possibilities and Limitations of Carlo Petrini's Slow Food Alternative. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):405-415.score: 56.0
    The majority of literature on Slow Food focuses on the organization or actors involved in the movement. There is a dearth of material analyzing Carlo Petrini’s aspirations for Slow Food, particularly in light of his desire within Slow Food Nation (2007) and Terra Madre (2010) to make “freewill giving a part of economic discourse.” This essay corrects the literature gap through historicizing and critiquing Petrini’s alternative to global capitalism while rooting it in actually existing practices. First, Petrini’s problematic conceptualization of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Scott Kretchmar (2007). Dualisms, Dichotomies and Dead Ends: Limitations of Analytic Thinking About Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (3):266 – 280.score: 54.0
    In this essay I attempt to show the limitations of analytic thinking and the kinds of dead ends into which such analyses may lead us in the philosophy of sport. As an alternative, I argue for a philosophy of complementation and compatibility in the face of what appear to be exclusive alternatives. This is a position that is sceptical of bifurcations and other simplified portrayals of reality but does not dismiss them entirely. A philosophy of complementation traffics in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Katherine E. Rowan (1994). The Technical and Democratic Approaches to Risk Situations: Their Appeal, Limitations, and Rhetorical Alternative. [REVIEW] Argumentation 8 (4):391-409.score: 52.0
    Because of the increasing number of “man-made” hazards in contemporary life, as well as the growing number of disastrous industrial accidents, interest in risk communication has burgeoned. Consequently, scholars and practitioners need to understand two of the more common responses to risk situations, the technical and democratic. This paper describes these two responses, identifies types of individuals likely to prefer each, and explains why, historically and sociologically, they are so intuitively compelling for many people. Arguing that both responses to risk (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Slobodan Perovic (2007). The Limitations of Kim's Reductive Physicalism in Accounting for Living Systems and an Alternative Nonreductionist Ontology. Acta Biotheoretica 55 (3).score: 50.0
    Jaegwon Kim’s exclusion argument is a general ontological argument, applicable to any properties deemed supervenient on a microproperty basis, including biological properties. It implies that the causal power of any higher-level property must be reducible to the subset of the causal powers of its lower-level properties. Moreover, as Kim’s recent version of the argument indicates, a higher-level property can be causally efficient only to the extent of the efficiency of its micro-basis. In response, I argue that the ontology that aims (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Richard B. Hovard (1971). Theoretical Reduction: The Limits and Alternatives to Reductive Methods in Scientific Explanation. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 1 (1):83-100.score: 50.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Carol E. Cleland (2002). 'Turing Limit'. Some of Them (Steinhart, Copeland) Represent Extensions of Tur-Ing's Account, Whereas Others Defend Alternatives Notions of Effective Computability (Bringsjord and Zenzen, Wells). Minds and Machines 12:157-158.score: 50.0
  13. Carlos Davidson (2000). Economic Growth and the Environment:Alternatives to the Limits Paradigm. BioScience 50 (5):433.score: 50.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Ruth Barcan (2008). Alternative Therapies as Disciplinary Practices : The Uses and Limitations of a Foucauldian Approach. In Nicole Anderson & Katrina Schlunke (eds.), Cultural Theory in Everyday Practice. Oxford University Press.score: 50.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Eckhart Arnold (2010). Can the Best-Alternative Justification Solve Hume's Problem? On the Limits of a Promising Approach. Philosophy of Science 77 (4):584-593.score: 48.0
    In a recent Philosophy of Science article Gerhard Schurz proposes meta-inductivistic prediction strategies as a new approach to Hume's. This comment examines the limitations of Schurz's approach. It can be proven that the meta-inductivist approach does not work any more if the meta-inductivists have to face an infinite number of alternative predictors. With his limitation it remains doubtful whether the meta-inductivist can provide a full solution to the problem of induction.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Federica Pazzaglia (2010). Are Alternative Organizational Forms the Solution to Limit Excessive Managerial Discretion? Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):623 - 639.score: 48.0
    Modern corporations have been widely accused of promoting values of managerial autonomy that can result in managerial waste and opportunistic behaviour, leading organizational theorists to suggest the adoption of alternative organizational forms that should normatively and structurally limit such autonomy. However, this mixed-methods study of an alternative organizational form — income trusts (1995—2005)— finds that income trusts were also characterized by excessive managerial autonomy. Managers strategically used the income trust form in discretionary ways such as by providing little information on (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. John Lowman & Ted Palys (2007). Strict Confidentiality: An Alternative to Pre's “Limited Confidentiality” Doctrine. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (2-4):163-177.score: 46.0
    In “Advisory Opinion on Confidentiality, Its Limits and Duties to Others” the Canadian Interagency Advisory Panel on Research Ethics (PRE) articulates a rationale for a priori limitations to research confidentiality, based largely on putative legal duties to violate confidentiality in certain circumstances. We argue that PRE promotes a “Law of the Land” doctrine of research ethics that is but one approach to resolving potential conflicts between law and research ethics. PRE emphasises risks that have never materialized, and ignores jurisprudence (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Laura B. DeLind (1986). The U.S. Farm Crisis: Program Responses and Alternatives to Them—the Case of Michigan. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 3 (4):59-65.score: 42.0
    The current crisis in U.S. agriculture has broadcast a rather simplex message. It is that the traditional family farm is in serious trouble. This message is apparent in the agricultural programs that have emerged in direct response to the farm crisis. Using Michigan's experience as illustration, these programs are shown to share similar objectives supported by a singular policy orientation. They utilize a ‘farm as firm’ model and treat the small farm operation as the unit of problem analysis and remedial (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. David J. Hufford (2003). Evaluating Complementary and Alternative Medicine: The Limits of Science and of Scientists. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (2):198-212.score: 40.0
  20. Y. Michael Barilan & Moshe Weintraub (2001). Persuasion as Respect for Persons: An Alternative View of Autonomy and of the Limits of Discourse. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (1):13 – 34.score: 40.0
    The article calls for a departure from the common concept of autonomy in two significant ways: it argues for the supremacy of semantic understanding over procedure, and claims that clinicians are morally obliged to make a strong effort to persuade patients to accept medical advice. We interpret the value of autonomy as derived from the right persons have to respect, as agents who can argue, persuade and be persuaded in matters of utmost personal significance such as decisions about medical care. (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Moshe Weintraub & Y. Michael Barilan (2001). Persuasion as Respect for Persons: An Alternative View of Autonomy and of the Limits of Discourse. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (1):13-34.score: 40.0
  22. Paul Guyer (2008). Kant's Transcendental Idealism and the Limits of Knowledge : Kant's Alternative to Locke's Physiology. In Daniel Garber & Béatrice Longuenesse (eds.), Kant and the Early Moderns. Princeton University Press.score: 40.0
  23. Bill Maurer (2005). Mutual Life, Limited: Islamic Banking, Alternative Currencies, Lateral Reason. Princeton University Press.score: 40.0
    Based on fieldwork among Islamic bankers globally, this book questions the equivalence between money and ethnography and asks whether money can ever be adequate to the value backing it. "I enjoyed this book mightily.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. E. Haavi Morreim (2002). Alternative Health Care: Limits of Science and Boundaries of Access. In Rosamond Rhodes, Margaret P. Battin & Anita Silvers (eds.), Medicine and Social Justice: Essays on the Distribution of Health Care. Oup Usa. 319.score: 40.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Guy Hawkins, Scott D. Brown, Mark Steyvers & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers (2012). Context Effects in Multi-Alternative Decision Making: Empirical Data and a Bayesian Model. Cognitive Science 36 (3):498-516.score: 38.0
    For decisions between many alternatives, the benchmark result is Hick's Law: that response time increases log-linearly with the number of choice alternatives. Even when Hick's Law is observed for response times, divergent results have been observed for error rates—sometimes error rates increase with the number of choice alternatives, and sometimes they are constant. We provide evidence from two experiments that error rates are mostly independent of the number of choice alternatives, unless context effects induce participants to (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Robin Jane Roff (2007). Shopping for Change? Neoliberalizing Activism and the Limits to Eating Non-GMO. Agriculture and Human Values 24 (4):511-522.score: 38.0
    While the cultivation of genetically modified organisms (GMO) and the spread of genetically engineered (GE) foods has gone largely unnoticed by the majority of Americans, a growing number of vocal civil society groups are opposing the technology and with it the entire conventional system of food provision. As with other alternative food movements, non-GMO activists focus on changing individual consumption habits as the best means of altering the practices of food manufacturers and thereby what and how food is produced. In (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Beverly I. Strassmann & Wendy M. Garrard (2011). Alternatives to the Grandmother Hypothesis. Human Nature 22 (1-2):201-222.score: 36.0
    We conducted a meta-analysis of 17 studies that tested for an association between grandparental survival and grandchild survival in patrilineal populations. Using two different methodologies, we found that the survival of the maternal grandmother and grandfather, but not the paternal grandmother and grandfather, was associated with decreased grandoffspring mortality. These results are consistent with the findings of psychological studies in developed countries (Coall and Hertwig Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33:1-59, 2010). When tested against the predictions of five hypotheses (confidence of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Weng Hong Tang (forthcoming). Belief and Cognitive Limitations. Philosophical Studies.score: 30.0
    A number of philosophers have argued that it is hard for finite agents like us to reason and make decisions relying solely on our credences and preferences. They hold that for us to cope with our cognitive limitations, we need binary beliefs as well. For they think that such beliefs, by disposing us to treat certain propositions as true, help us cut down on the number of possibilities we need to consider when we reason. But using Ross and Schroeder (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. David Duarte (2011). Linguistic Objectivity in Norm Sentences: Alternatives in Literal Meaning. Ratio Juris 24 (2):112-139.score: 30.0
    Assuming that legal science, specifically with regard to interpretation, has to provide the tools to reduce the uncertainty of legal solutions arising from the use of natural languages by legal orders, it becomes a central matter to identify, in this limited domain, the spectrum of semantic variation (and its boundaries) that language brings to the definition of a norm expressed by a norm sentence. It is in this framework that the present paper, analyzing norm sentences as a specific kind of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Hannes Gerhardt (2011). Giorgio Agamben's Lessons and Limitations in Confronting the Problem of Genocide. Journal of Global Ethics 7 (1):5 - 17.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I work through the possible contours of an anti-genocide based on a framework informed by the work of Giorgio Agamben. Such a framework posits the inherent need to circumvent sovereign power within any form of normative activism. To begin, I show how the nascent anti-genocide movement promotes an ideal in which ?Western? states, particularly the USA, accept the global responsibility to protect persecuted life beyond national boundaries. Using Agamben, I argue that this vision also entails an acceptance (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Graeme S. Halford (1997). Recoding Can Lead to Inaccessible Structures, but Avoids Capacity Limitations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):75-75.score: 30.0
    The distinction between uninformed learning (type-1) and learning based on recoding using prior information (type-2) helps to clarify some long-standing psychological problems, including misunderstanding of mathematics by children, the need for active construction of concepts in cognitive development, and the difficulty of configural learning tasks. However, an alternative to recoding some type-2 tasks is to represent the input as separate dimensions, which are processed jointly. This preserves the original structure, but is subject to processing capacity limitations.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jay G. Rueckl (2012). The Limitations of the Reverse-Engineering Approach to Cognitive Modeling. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):43-43.score: 30.0
    Frost's critique reveals the limitations of the reverse-engineering approach to cognitive modeling – the style of psychological explanation in which a stipulated internal organization (in the form of a computational mechanism) explains a relatively narrow set of phenomena. An alternative is to view organization as both the explanation for some phenomena and a phenomenon to be explained. This move poses new and interesting theoretical challenges for theories of word reading.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Marcin Morzycki (2011). Metalinguistic Comparison in an Alternative Semantics for Imprecision. Natural Language Semantics 19 (1):39-86.score: 28.0
    This paper offers an analysis of metalinguistic comparatives such as more dumb than crazy in which they differ from ordinary comparatives in the scale on which they compare: ordinary comparatives use scales lexically determined by particular adjectives, but metalinguistic ones use a generally-available scale of imprecision or ‘pragmatic slack’. To implement this idea, I propose a novel compositional implementation of the Lasersohnian pragmatic-halos account of imprecision—one that represents clusters of similar meanings as Hamblin alternatives. In the theory that results, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Kristin Cashman (1991). Systems of Knowledge as Systems of Domination: The Limitations of Established Meaning. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 8 (1-2):49-58.score: 28.0
    The hegemony of Western science, inherent in international development projects, often increases the poverty and oppression of Third World women by pre-empting alternative realities. In African and Asian agrarian societies women grow from 60 to 90% of the food (World Bank, 1989); they hold incredible potential to increase food production. Their ability to operate under more marginal conditions than their male counterparts would seem to indicate that they have developed valuable knowledge— knowledge often generated in response to limited access to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Tomas Mackevičius & Marius Rakštelis (2010). Realization of the Liberty Limitation Punishment (text only in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 122 (4):261-277.score: 28.0
    The article deals with a study of a distinct criminal punishment established in the Criminal Code and the Code of Punishment Enforcement of the Republic of Lithuania—restriction of liberty, as an alternative to imprisonment. Without investigating extensively the course of development of this penalty, in the article it is sought to overview the development trends of restriction of liberty; analyse the problems of enforcing this penalty and suggest measures to eliminate them; investigate whether the legal regulation of Lithuania is in (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Michael Devitt (2011). Are Unconceived Alternatives a Problem for Scientific Realism? Journal for General Philosophy of Science 42 (2):285-293.score: 24.0
    Stanford, in Exceeding Our Grasp , presents a powerful version of the pessimistic meta-induction. He claims that theories typically have empirically inequivalent but nonetheless well-confirmed, serious alternatives which are unconceived. This claim should be uncontroversial. But it alone is no threat to scientific realism. The threat comes from Stanford’s further crucial claim, supported by historical examples, that a theory’s unconceived alternatives are “radically distinct” from it; there is no “continuity”. A standard realist reply to the meta-induction is that (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Mikkel Gerken (2013). Epistemic Focal Bias. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (1):41 - 61.score: 24.0
    This paper defends strict invariantism against some philosophical and empirical data that have been taken to compromise it. The defence involves a combination of a priori philosophical arguments and empirically informed theorizing. The positive account of the data is an epistemic focal bias account that draws on cognitive psychology. It involves the assumption that, owing to limitations of the involved cognitive resources, intuitive judgments about knowledge ascriptions are generated by processing only a limited part of the available information?the part (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Wesley H. Holliday (forthcoming). Epistemic Closure and Epistemic Logic I: Relevant Alternatives and Subjunctivism. Journal of Philosophical Logic:1-62.score: 24.0
    Epistemic closure has been a central issue in epistemology over the last forty years. According to versions of the relevant alternatives and subjunctivist theories of knowledge, epistemic closure can fail: an agent who knows some propositions can fail to know a logical consequence of those propositions, even if the agent explicitly believes the consequence (having “competently deduced” it from the known propositions). In this sense, the claim that epistemic closure can fail must be distinguished from the fact that agents (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Roni Katzir (2007). Structurally-Defined Alternatives. Linguistics and Philosophy 30 (6):669-690.score: 24.0
    Scalar implicatures depend on alternatives in order to avoid the symmetry problem. I argue for a structure-sensitive characterization of these alternatives: the alternatives for a structure are all those structures that are at most as complex as the original one. There have been claims in the literature that complexity is irrelevant for implicatures and that the relevant condition is the semantic notion of monotonicity. I provide new data that pose a challenge to the use of monotonicity and (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Carl T. Bergstrom & Peter Godfrey-Smith (1998). On the Evolution of Behavioral Complexity in Individuals and Populations. Biology and Philosophy 13 (2):205-31.score: 24.0
    A wide range of ecological and evolutionary models predict variety in phenotype or behavior when a population is at equilibrium. This heterogeneity can be realized in different ways. For example, it can be realized through a complex population of individuals exhibiting different simple behaviors, or through a simple population of individuals exhibiting complex, varying behaviors. In some theoretical frameworks these different realizations are treated as equivalent, but natural selection distinguishes between these two alternatives in subtle ways. By investigating an (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Chrisoula Andreou (2005). Incommensurable Alternatives and Rational Choice. Ratio 18 (3):249–261.score: 24.0
    I consider the implications of incommensurability for the assumption, in rational choice theory, that a rational agent’s preferences are complete. I argue that, contrary to appearances, the completeness assumption and the existence of incommensurability are compatible. Indeed, reflection on incommensurability suggests that one’s preferences should be complete over even the incommensurable alternatives one faces.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. David J. Gunkel (2014). A Vindication of the Rights of Machines. Philosophy and Technology 27 (1):113-132.score: 24.0
    This essay responds to the machine question in the affirmative, arguing that artifacts, like robots, AI, and other autonomous systems, can no longer be legitimately excluded from moral consideration. The demonstration of this thesis proceeds in four parts or movements. The first and second parts approach the subject by investigating the two constitutive components of the ethical relationship—moral agency and patiency. In the process, they each demonstrate failure. This occurs not because the machine is somehow unable to achieve what is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Stevan Harnad (1987). Category Induction and Representation. In [Book Chapter].score: 24.0
    A provisional model is presented in which categorical perception (CP) provides our basic or elementary categories. In acquiring a category we learn to label or identify positive and negative instances from a sample of confusable alternatives. Two kinds of internal representation are built up in this learning by "acquaintance": (1) an iconic representation that subserves our similarity judgments and (2) an analog/digital feature-filter that picks out the invariant information allowing us to categorize the instances correctly. This second, categorical representation (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Rodney C. Roberts (2007). Another Look at a Moral Statute of Limitations on Injustice. Journal of Ethics 11 (2):177 - 192.score: 24.0
    This paper addresses the question of whether a statute of limitations on injustice is morally justified. Rectificatory justice calls for the ascription of a right to rectification once an injustice has been perpetrated. To claim a moral statute of limitations on injustice is to claim a temporal limit on the moral legitimacy of rights to rectification. A moral statute of limitations on injustice (hereafter MSOL) establishes an amount of time following injustice after which claims of rectification can (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Terence J. Centner (2010). Limitations on the Confinement of Food Animals in the United States. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (5):469-486.score: 24.0
    Citizen petitions and legislative bills in seven states in the US have established space and movement limitations for selected species of farm animals. These actions show Americans becoming concerned about the humane treatment of confined farm animals, and willing to use governmental intervention to preclude existing confinement practices. The individual state provisions vary, including the coverage of species. All seven states deal with sow-gestation crates, five states address veal calf crates, and two states’ provisions also apply to battery cages (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Rodney C. Roberts (2003). The Morality of a Moral Statute of Limitations on Injustice. Journal of Ethics 7 (1):115-138.score: 24.0
    This paper addresses the question of whether astatute of limitations on injustice is morallyjustified. Rectificatory justice calls for theascription of a right to rectification once aninjustice has been perpetrated. To claim amoral statute of limitations on injustice is toclaim a temporal limit on the moral legitimacyof rights to rectification. A moral statute oflimitations on injustice establishes an amountof time following injustice after which claimsof rectification can no longer be valid. Such astatute would put a time limit on the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Ernest Sosa (1993). Review: Proper Functionalism and Virtue Epistemology. [REVIEW] Noûs 27 (1):51 - 65.score: 24.0
    Comprehensive and packed, Alvin Plantinga's two-volume treatise defies summary. The first volume, Warrant: Current Views, is a meticulous critical survey of epistemology today. Many current approaches are presented and exhaustively discussed, and a negative verdict is passed on each in turn. This prepares the way for volume two, Warrant and Proper Function, where a positive view is advanced and developed in satisfying detail. The cumulative result is most impressive, and should command attention for years to come. Here I cannot possibly (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Stefano Gualeni (2014). Augmented Ontologies or How to Philosophize with a Digital Hammer. Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):177-199.score: 24.0
    Could a person ever transcend what it is like to be in the world as a human being? Could we ever know what it is like to be other creatures? Questions about the overcoming of a human perspective are not uncommon in the history of philosophy. In the last century, those very interrogatives were notably raised by American philosopher Thomas Nagel in the context of philosophy of mind. In his 1974 essay What is it Like to Be a Bat?, Nagel (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Wesley H. Holliday (2012). Epistemic Logic, Relevant Alternatives, and the Dynamics of Context. Lecture Notes in Computer Science 7415:109-129.score: 24.0
    According to the Relevant Alternatives (RA) Theory of knowledge, knowing that something is the case involves ruling out (only) the relevant alternatives. The conception of knowledge in epistemic logic also involves the elimination of possibilities, but without an explicit distinction, among the possibilities consistent with an agent’s information, between those relevant possibilities that an agent must rule out in order to know and those remote, far-fetched or otherwise irrelevant possibilities. In this article, I propose formalizations of two versions (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Stanley A. Mulaik (1985). Exploratory Statistics and Empiricism. Philosophy of Science 52 (3):410-430.score: 24.0
    Exploratory statistics represents the transformation of a realist theory of statistics held by early nineteenth-century astronomers into an empiricist theory of statistics held by biometricians at the turn of the twentieth century. This paper discusses four key ideas in empiricist thought that influenced the form exploratory statistics took: (1) Baconianism, (2) associationism, (3) the search for cognitive calculi, and (4) phenomenalism. Some limitations of and alternatives to exploratory statistics as a hypothesis-generating methodology are discussed.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000