Search results for 'Limitations and Alternatives' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Balaganapathi Devarakonda (2009). Limitations and Alternatives: Understanding Indian Philosophy. Calicut University Research Journal, ISSN No. 09723348 (1):47-58.score: 61.0
    This paper attempts to articulate certain inadequacies that are involved in the traditional way of categorizing Indian philosophy and explores alternative approaches, some of which otherwise are not explicitly seen in the treatises of the history of Indian Philosophies. By categorization, I mean, classifying Indian philosophy into two streams, which are traditionally called as astica and nastica or orthodox and heterodox systems. Further, these different schools in the astica Darsanas and nastica Darsanas are usually numbered into six and three respectively. (...)
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  2. David Livingstone Smith (2007). Interrogating the Westermarck Hypothesis: Limitations, Problems, and Alternatives. Biological Theory 2 (3):307-316.score: 36.0
  3. Antje S. Meyer (1992). Investigation of Phonological Encoding Through Speech Error Analyses: Achievements, Limitations, and Alternatives. Cognition 42 (1-3):181-211.score: 36.0
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  4. A. S. Meyer (1991). The Time Course of Phonological Encoding in Language Production: Phonological Encoding Inside the Syllable. Joumal of Memory and Language, 30, 69-89. Meyer, AS (1992). Investigation of Phonological Encoding Through Speech Error Analysis: Achievements, Limitations and Alternatives. [REVIEW] Cognition 42:181-212.score: 36.0
     
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  5. Frederik Herzberg (forthcoming). A Note on “The No Alternatives Argument” by Richard Dawid, Stephan Hartmann and Jan Sprenger. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-10.score: 27.0
    The defence of The No Alternatives Argument in a recent paper by R. Dawid, S. Hartmann and J. Sprenger (forthcoming in the British Journal for the Philosophy of Science; latest version: February 2013) rests on the assumption (among others) that the number of acceptable alternatives to a scientific hypothesis is independent of the complexity of the scientific problem. This note proves a generalisation of the main theorem by Dawid, Hartmann and Sprenger, where this independence assumption is no longer (...)
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  6. Frances Myrna Kamm (1987). The Insanity Defense, Innocent Threats, and Limited Alternatives. Criminal Justice Ethics 6 (1):61-76.score: 21.0
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  7. Scott Kretchmar (2007). Dualisms, Dichotomies and Dead Ends: Limitations of Analytic Thinking About Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (3):266 – 280.score: 21.0
    In this essay I attempt to show the limitations of analytic thinking and the kinds of dead ends into which such analyses may lead us in the philosophy of sport. As an alternative, I argue for a philosophy of complementation and compatibility in the face of what appear to be exclusive alternatives. This is a position that is sceptical of bifurcations and other simplified portrayals of reality but does not dismiss them entirely. A philosophy of complementation traffics in (...)
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  8. Justin Myers (2013). The Logic of the Gift: The Possibilities and Limitations of Carlo Petrini's Slow Food Alternative. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):405-415.score: 21.0
    The majority of literature on Slow Food focuses on the organization or actors involved in the movement. There is a dearth of material analyzing Carlo Petrini’s aspirations for Slow Food, particularly in light of his desire within Slow Food Nation (2007) and Terra Madre (2010) to make “freewill giving a part of economic discourse.” This essay corrects the literature gap through historicizing and critiquing Petrini’s alternative to global capitalism while rooting it in actually existing practices. First, Petrini’s problematic conceptualization of (...)
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  9. Katherine E. Rowan (1994). The Technical and Democratic Approaches to Risk Situations: Their Appeal, Limitations, and Rhetorical Alternative. [REVIEW] Argumentation 8 (4):391-409.score: 19.0
    Because of the increasing number of “man-made” hazards in contemporary life, as well as the growing number of disastrous industrial accidents, interest in risk communication has burgeoned. Consequently, scholars and practitioners need to understand two of the more common responses to risk situations, the technical and democratic. This paper describes these two responses, identifies types of individuals likely to prefer each, and explains why, historically and sociologically, they are so intuitively compelling for many people. Arguing that both responses to risk (...)
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  10. Michael Devitt (2011). Are Unconceived Alternatives a Problem for Scientific Realism? Journal for General Philosophy of Science 42 (2):285-293.score: 18.0
    Stanford, in Exceeding Our Grasp , presents a powerful version of the pessimistic meta-induction. He claims that theories typically have empirically inequivalent but nonetheless well-confirmed, serious alternatives which are unconceived. This claim should be uncontroversial. But it alone is no threat to scientific realism. The threat comes from Stanford’s further crucial claim, supported by historical examples, that a theory’s unconceived alternatives are “radically distinct” from it; there is no “continuity”. A standard realist reply to the meta-induction is that (...)
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  11. Roni Katzir (2007). Structurally-Defined Alternatives. Linguistics and Philosophy 30 (6):669-690.score: 18.0
    Scalar implicatures depend on alternatives in order to avoid the symmetry problem. I argue for a structure-sensitive characterization of these alternatives: the alternatives for a structure are all those structures that are at most as complex as the original one. There have been claims in the literature that complexity is irrelevant for implicatures and that the relevant condition is the semantic notion of monotonicity. I provide new data that pose a challenge to the use of monotonicity and (...)
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  12. Wesley H. Holliday (forthcoming). Epistemic Closure and Epistemic Logic I: Relevant Alternatives and Subjunctivism. Journal of Philosophical Logic:1-62.score: 18.0
    Epistemic closure has been a central issue in epistemology over the last forty years. According to versions of the relevant alternatives and subjunctivist theories of knowledge, epistemic closure can fail: an agent who knows some propositions can fail to know a logical consequence of those propositions, even if the agent explicitly believes the consequence (having “competently deduced” it from the known propositions). In this sense, the claim that epistemic closure can fail must be distinguished from the fact that agents (...)
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  13. Chrisoula Andreou (2005). Incommensurable Alternatives and Rational Choice. Ratio 18 (3):249–261.score: 18.0
    I consider the implications of incommensurability for the assumption, in rational choice theory, that a rational agent’s preferences are complete. I argue that, contrary to appearances, the completeness assumption and the existence of incommensurability are compatible. Indeed, reflection on incommensurability suggests that one’s preferences should be complete over even the incommensurable alternatives one faces.
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  14. Slobodan Perovic (2007). The Limitations of Kim's Reductive Physicalism in Accounting for Living Systems and an Alternative Nonreductionist Ontology. Acta Biotheoretica 55 (3).score: 18.0
    Jaegwon Kim’s exclusion argument is a general ontological argument, applicable to any properties deemed supervenient on a microproperty basis, including biological properties. It implies that the causal power of any higher-level property must be reducible to the subset of the causal powers of its lower-level properties. Moreover, as Kim’s recent version of the argument indicates, a higher-level property can be causally efficient only to the extent of the efficiency of its micro-basis. In response, I argue that the ontology that aims (...)
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  15. Rodney C. Roberts (2007). Another Look at a Moral Statute of Limitations on Injustice. Journal of Ethics 11 (2):177 - 192.score: 18.0
    This paper addresses the question of whether a statute of limitations on injustice is morally justified. Rectificatory justice calls for the ascription of a right to rectification once an injustice has been perpetrated. To claim a moral statute of limitations on injustice is to claim a temporal limit on the moral legitimacy of rights to rectification. A moral statute of limitations on injustice (hereafter MSOL) establishes an amount of time following injustice after which claims of rectification can (...)
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  16. Terence J. Centner (2010). Limitations on the Confinement of Food Animals in the United States. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (5):469-486.score: 18.0
    Citizen petitions and legislative bills in seven states in the US have established space and movement limitations for selected species of farm animals. These actions show Americans becoming concerned about the humane treatment of confined farm animals, and willing to use governmental intervention to preclude existing confinement practices. The individual state provisions vary, including the coverage of species. All seven states deal with sow-gestation crates, five states address veal calf crates, and two states’ provisions also apply to battery cages (...)
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  17. Rodney C. Roberts (2003). The Morality of a Moral Statute of Limitations on Injustice. Journal of Ethics 7 (1):115-138.score: 18.0
    This paper addresses the question of whether astatute of limitations on injustice is morallyjustified. Rectificatory justice calls for theascription of a right to rectification once aninjustice has been perpetrated. To claim amoral statute of limitations on injustice is toclaim a temporal limit on the moral legitimacyof rights to rectification. A moral statute oflimitations on injustice establishes an amountof time following injustice after which claimsof rectification can no longer be valid. Such astatute would put a time limit on the (...)
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  18. Wesley H. Holliday (2012). Epistemic Logic, Relevant Alternatives, and the Dynamics of Context. Lecture Notes in Computer Science 7415:109-129.score: 18.0
    According to the Relevant Alternatives (RA) Theory of knowledge, knowing that something is the case involves ruling out (only) the relevant alternatives. The conception of knowledge in epistemic logic also involves the elimination of possibilities, but without an explicit distinction, among the possibilities consistent with an agent’s information, between those relevant possibilities that an agent must rule out in order to know and those remote, far-fetched or otherwise irrelevant possibilities. In this article, I propose formalizations of two versions (...)
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  19. Ioannis Votsis (2007). Review of Kyle Stanford’s Exceeding Our Grasp: Science, History and the Problem of Unconceived Alternatives. [REVIEW] International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 21 (1):103 – 106.score: 18.0
    In recent years, two challenges stand out against scientific realism: the argument from the underdetermination of theories by evidence (UTE) and the pessimistic induction argument (PI). In his book, Kyle Stanford accepts the gravity of these challenges, but argues that the most serious and powerful challenge to scientific realism has been neglected. The problem of unconceived alternatives (PUA), as he calls it, is introduced in chapter one and refined in chapter two. In short, PUA holds that throughout history scientists (...)
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  20. Danny Fox & Roni Katzir (2011). On the Characterization of Alternatives. Natural Language Semantics 19 (1):87-107.score: 18.0
    We present an argument for revising the theory of alternatives for Scalar Implicatures and for Association with Focus. We argue that in both cases the alternatives are determined in the same way, as a contextual restriction of the focus value of the sentence, which, in turn, is defined in structure-sensitive terms. We provide evidence that contextual restriction is subject to a constraint that prevents it from discriminating between alternatives when they stand in a particular logical relationship with (...)
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  21. Anamaria Fălăuş (2014). (Partially) Free Choice of Alternatives. Linguistics and Philosophy 37 (2):121-173.score: 18.0
    This paper contributes to the semantic typology of dependent indefinites, by accounting for the distribution and interpretation of the Romanian indefinite vreun. It is shown that its occurrences are restricted to negative polarity and a subset of modal contexts. More specifically, the study of its behavior in intensional environments reveals that vreun is systematically incompatible with non-epistemic operators, a restriction we capture by proposing a novel empirical generalization (‘the epistemic constraint’). To account for the observed pattern, we adopt the unitary (...)
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  22. Elizabeth Victor (2013). Scientific Research and Human Rights: A Response to Kitcher on the Limitations of Inquiry. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-19.score: 18.0
    In his recent work exploring the role of science in democratic societies Kitcher (Science in a democratic society. Prometheus Books, New York, 2011) claims that scientists ought to have a prominent role in setting the agenda for and limits to research. Against the backdrop of the claim that the proper limits of scientific inquiry is John Stuart Mill’s Harm Principle (Kitcher in Science, truth, and democracy. Oxford University Press, New York, 2001), he identifies the limits of inquiry as the point (...)
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  23. Susumu Cato (forthcoming). Independence of Irrelevant Alternatives Revisited. Theory and Decision:1-17.score: 18.0
    This paper aims to reexamine the axiom of the independence of irrelevant alternatives in the theory of social choice. A generalized notion of independence is introduced to clarify an informational requirement of binary independence which is usually imposed in the Arrovian framework. We characterize the implication of binary independence.
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  24. Richard B. Hovard (1971). Theoretical Reduction: The Limits and Alternatives to Reductive Methods in Scientific Explanation. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 1 (1):83-100.score: 18.0
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  25. Michael Neumann (2007). Choosing and Describing: Sen and the Irrelevance of Independence Alternatives. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 63 (1):79-94.score: 18.0
    Amartya Sen argues that it is not, after all, irrational to reverse preferences when your choices are amplified by an ‘irrelevant’ alternative. He offers examples such as the agent who always picks the next-to-largest piece of cake. Given a choice between a larger and smaller piece, I will prefer the smaller one. But when a third and largest piece in added to my alternatives, I will now prefer the formerly largest piece over the smallest piece. This violates ‘contraction consistency’: (...)
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  26. Carol E. Cleland (2002). 'Turing Limit'. Some of Them (Steinhart, Copeland) Represent Extensions of Tur-Ing's Account, Whereas Others Defend Alternatives Notions of Effective Computability (Bringsjord and Zenzen, Wells). Minds and Machines 12:157-158.score: 18.0
  27. Ruth Barcan (2008). Alternative Therapies as Disciplinary Practices : The Uses and Limitations of a Foucauldian Approach. In Nicole Anderson & Katrina Schlunke (eds.), Cultural Theory in Everyday Practice. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
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  28. Carlos Davidson (2000). Economic Growth and the Environment:Alternatives to the Limits Paradigm. Bioscience 50 (5):433.score: 18.0
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  29. Guy Hawkins, Scott D. Brown, Mark Steyvers & Eric-Jan Wagenmakers (2012). Context Effects in Multi-Alternative Decision Making: Empirical Data and a Bayesian Model. Cognitive Science 36 (3):498-516.score: 17.0
    For decisions between many alternatives, the benchmark result is Hick's Law: that response time increases log-linearly with the number of choice alternatives. Even when Hick's Law is observed for response times, divergent results have been observed for error rates—sometimes error rates increase with the number of choice alternatives, and sometimes they are constant. We provide evidence from two experiments that error rates are mostly independent of the number of choice alternatives, unless context effects induce participants to (...)
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  30. Robin Jane Roff (2007). Shopping for Change? Neoliberalizing Activism and the Limits to Eating Non-GMO. Agriculture and Human Values 24 (4):511-522.score: 17.0
    While the cultivation of genetically modified organisms (GMO) and the spread of genetically engineered (GE) foods has gone largely unnoticed by the majority of Americans, a growing number of vocal civil society groups are opposing the technology and with it the entire conventional system of food provision. As with other alternative food movements, non-GMO activists focus on changing individual consumption habits as the best means of altering the practices of food manufacturers and thereby what and how food is produced. In (...)
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  31. Eckhart Arnold (2010). Can the Best-Alternative Justification Solve Hume's Problem? On the Limits of a Promising Approach. Philosophy of Science 77 (4):584-593.score: 16.0
    In a recent Philosophy of Science article Gerhard Schurz proposes meta-inductivistic prediction strategies as a new approach to Hume's. This comment examines the limitations of Schurz's approach. It can be proven that the meta-inductivist approach does not work any more if the meta-inductivists have to face an infinite number of alternative predictors. With his limitation it remains doubtful whether the meta-inductivist can provide a full solution to the problem of induction.
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  32. Federica Pazzaglia (2010). Are Alternative Organizational Forms the Solution to Limit Excessive Managerial Discretion? Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):623 - 639.score: 16.0
    Modern corporations have been widely accused of promoting values of managerial autonomy that can result in managerial waste and opportunistic behaviour, leading organizational theorists to suggest the adoption of alternative organizational forms that should normatively and structurally limit such autonomy. However, this mixed-methods study of an alternative organizational form — income trusts (1995—2005)— finds that income trusts were also characterized by excessive managerial autonomy. Managers strategically used the income trust form in discretionary ways such as by providing little information on (...)
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  33. Hannes Gerhardt (2011). Giorgio Agamben's Lessons and Limitations in Confronting the Problem of Genocide. Journal of Global Ethics 7 (1):5 - 17.score: 15.0
    In this paper, I work through the possible contours of an anti-genocide based on a framework informed by the work of Giorgio Agamben. Such a framework posits the inherent need to circumvent sovereign power within any form of normative activism. To begin, I show how the nascent anti-genocide movement promotes an ideal in which ?Western? states, particularly the USA, accept the global responsibility to protect persecuted life beyond national boundaries. Using Agamben, I argue that this vision also entails an acceptance (...)
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  34. Eric Swanson (2010). Structurally Defined Alternatives and Lexicalizations of XOR. Linguistics and Philosophy 33 (1):31-36.score: 15.0
    In his recent paper on the symmetry problem Roni Katzir argues that the only relevant factor for the calculation of any Quantity implicature is syntactic structure. I first refute Katzir’s thesis with three examples that show that structural complexity is irrelevant to the calculation of some Quantity implicatures. I then argue that it is inadvisable to assume—as Katzir and others do—that exactly one factor is relevant to the calculation of any Quantity implicature.
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  35. David Duarte (2011). Linguistic Objectivity in Norm Sentences: Alternatives in Literal Meaning. Ratio Juris 24 (2):112-139.score: 15.0
    Assuming that legal science, specifically with regard to interpretation, has to provide the tools to reduce the uncertainty of legal solutions arising from the use of natural languages by legal orders, it becomes a central matter to identify, in this limited domain, the spectrum of semantic variation (and its boundaries) that language brings to the definition of a norm expressed by a norm sentence. It is in this framework that the present paper, analyzing norm sentences as a specific kind of (...)
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  36. John Lowman & Ted Palys (2007). Strict Confidentiality: An Alternative to Pre's “Limited Confidentiality” Doctrine. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (2-4):163-177.score: 15.0
    In “Advisory Opinion on Confidentiality, Its Limits and Duties to Others” the Canadian Interagency Advisory Panel on Research Ethics (PRE) articulates a rationale for a priori limitations to research confidentiality, based largely on putative legal duties to violate confidentiality in certain circumstances. We argue that PRE promotes a “Law of the Land” doctrine of research ethics that is but one approach to resolving potential conflicts between law and research ethics. PRE emphasises risks that have never materialized, and ignores jurisprudence (...)
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  37. Weng Hong Tang (forthcoming). Belief and Cognitive Limitations. Philosophical Studies.score: 15.0
    A number of philosophers have argued that it is hard for finite agents like us to reason and make decisions relying solely on our credences and preferences. They hold that for us to cope with our cognitive limitations, we need binary beliefs as well. For they think that such beliefs, by disposing us to treat certain propositions as true, help us cut down on the number of possibilities we need to consider when we reason. But using Ross and Schroeder (...)
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  38. Graeme S. Halford (1997). Recoding Can Lead to Inaccessible Structures, but Avoids Capacity Limitations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):75-75.score: 15.0
    The distinction between uninformed learning (type-1) and learning based on recoding using prior information (type-2) helps to clarify some long-standing psychological problems, including misunderstanding of mathematics by children, the need for active construction of concepts in cognitive development, and the difficulty of configural learning tasks. However, an alternative to recoding some type-2 tasks is to represent the input as separate dimensions, which are processed jointly. This preserves the original structure, but is subject to processing capacity limitations.
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  39. William F. Battig & John K. Berry (1966). Effects of Number and Similarity of Pretraining Alternatives on Paired-Associate Performance on Pretrained and New Items Under Correction and Noncorrection Procedures. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (5):722.score: 15.0
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  40. Marcin Morzycki (2011). Metalinguistic Comparison in an Alternative Semantics for Imprecision. Natural Language Semantics 19 (1):39-86.score: 15.0
    This paper offers an analysis of metalinguistic comparatives such as more dumb than crazy in which they differ from ordinary comparatives in the scale on which they compare: ordinary comparatives use scales lexically determined by particular adjectives, but metalinguistic ones use a generally-available scale of imprecision or ‘pragmatic slack’. To implement this idea, I propose a novel compositional implementation of the Lasersohnian pragmatic-halos account of imprecision—one that represents clusters of similar meanings as Hamblin alternatives. In the theory that results, (...)
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  41. Howard Brand, James M. Sakoda & Paul J. Woods (1957). Contingent Partial Reinforcement and the Anticipation of Correct Alternatives. Journal of Experimental Psychology 53 (6):417.score: 15.0
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  42. Gary A. Davis (1967). Detrimental Effects of Distraction, Additional Response Alternatives, and Longer Response Chains in Solving Switch-Light Problems. Journal of Experimental Psychology 73 (1):45.score: 15.0
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  43. Gary A. Davis, Alice J. Train & Mary E. Manske (1968). Trial and Error Versus "Insightful" Problem Solving: Effects of Distraction, Additional Response Alternatives, and Longer Response Chains. Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (3p1):337.score: 15.0
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  44. Laura B. DeLind (1986). The U.S. Farm Crisis: Program Responses and Alternatives to Them—the Case of Michigan. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 3 (4):59-65.score: 15.0
    The current crisis in U.S. agriculture has broadcast a rather simplex message. It is that the traditional family farm is in serious trouble. This message is apparent in the agricultural programs that have emerged in direct response to the farm crisis. Using Michigan's experience as illustration, these programs are shown to share similar objectives supported by a singular policy orientation. They utilize a ‘farm as firm’ model and treat the small farm operation as the unit of problem analysis and remedial (...)
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  45. Douglas H. Lawrence & George R. Coles (1954). Accuracy of Recognition with Alternatives Before and After the Stimulus. Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (3):208.score: 15.0
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  46. Hadassah Paul (1971). Ratio of Correct to Incorrect Alternatives: A Test of the Frequency Hypothesis of Verbal Discrimination Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 88 (2):285.score: 15.0
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  47. James Raftery (1999). Methodological Limitations of Cost‐Effectiveness Analysis in Health Care: Implications for Decision Making and Service Provision. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 5 (4):361-366.score: 15.0
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  48. Martha Teghtsoonian & Robert Teghtsoonian (1970). Transitory Effect of Number of Alternatives on Performance in a Recognition Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (3):467.score: 15.0
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  49. James R. Ullrich (1972). Re-Pairing, Number of Alternatives, and Meaningfulness in Verbal Discrimination Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (1):201.score: 15.0
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  50. William H. Field & Roy Lachman (1966). Information Transmission (I) in Recognition and Recall as a Function of Alternatives (K). Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (6):785.score: 15.0
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