Search results for 'Linda Clarke' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Linda Brennan, Irvine Clarke, Pierre Desrochers, Bill Jenkins, Carol Armstrong, Kevin Sylwester, Aykut Kibritcioglu, Nejat Capar, Ilan Alon & Bryan Pfaffenberger (2001). Book Notes. [REVIEW] Knowledge, Technology and Policy 13 (4):114-142.
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    Linda Clarke & Christopher Winch (2004). Apprenticeship and Applied Theoretical Knowledge. Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (5):509–521.
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  3. Samuel Clarke & Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1717). A Collection of Papers, Which Passed Between the Late Learned Mr. Leibnitz and Dr. Clarke in the Years 1715 and 1716 Relating to the Principles of Natural Philosophy and Religion : With an Appendix : To Which Are Added, Letters to Dr. Clarke Concerning Liberty and Necessity, From a Gentleman of the University of Cambridge, with the Doctor's Answers to Them : Also, Remarks Upon a Book, Entituled, a Philosophical Enquiry Concerning Human Liberty. [REVIEW] Printed for James Knapton.
  4.  31
    Norris Clarke (1999). The Thomism of Norris Clarke. Philosophy and Theology 11 (2):265-285.
    William Norris Clarke, S.J., one of the leading Thomist scholars in the United States, came to the Philippines recently and delivered a series of lectures in the Ateneo de Manila University and the University of Santo Tomas on various philosophical topics inspired by the thought of St. Thomas. Fr. Clarke is now a Professor Emeritus of Philosophy in Fordham University. He was co-founder and editor (l961-85) of the International Philosophical Quarterly and is the author of some (...)
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  5.  19
    Samuel Clarke (1956). The Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence: Together with Extracts From Newton's Principia and Opticks. Barnes & Noble.
    This book presents extracts from Leibniz's letters to Newtonian scientist Samuel Clarke.
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  6. Samuel Clarke & Anthony Collins (2011). The Correspondence of Samuel Clarke and Anthony Collins, 1707-08. Broadview Press.
    An important work in the debate between materialists and dualists, the public correspondence between Anthony Collins and Samuel Clarke provided the framework for arguments over consciousness and personal identity in eighteenth-century Britain. In Clarke's view, mind and consciousness are so unified that they cannot be compounded into wholes or divided into parts, so mind and consciousness must be distinct from matter. Collins, by contrast, was a perceptive advocate of a materialist account of mind, who defended the possibility that (...)
     
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  7. W. Norris Clarke & Gerald A. McCool (eds.) (1988). The Universe as Journey: Conversations with W. Norris Clarke, S.J. Fordham University Press.
    W. Norris Clarke's metaphysics of the universe as a journey rests on six major positions: the unrestricted dynamism of the mind, the primacy of the act of existence, the participation structure of reality, and the person, considered as both the starting point of philosophy and the source of the categories needed for a flexible contemporary metaphysics. Reflecting on his conscious life and the universe around him, the finite person mounts by a two-fold path to its Infinite source, who, though (...)
     
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  8. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz & Samuel Clarke (2007). The Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence. In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Late Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell Pub. Ltd.
  9.  8
    Dudley Montague Clarke (1984). Keston Clarke. The Chesterton Review 10 (1):109-110.
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  10. Desmond M. Clarke (1987). Acting According to Conscience: Desmond M. Clarke. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 22:135-149.
    We have inherited from the history of moral philosophy two very different proposals about how we ought to behave. According to one view, we are required to do what is morally right; on the alternative formulation, we are required to do what we believe to be morally right. Unless these twin demands on our moral decision-making can be made to coincide by definition, it is inevitable that in some cases our beliefs about what is morally right may be mistaken. In (...)
     
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  11. P. B. Clarke (1980). Islamic Millenarianism in West Africa: A ‘Revolutionary’ Ideology?: P. B. CLARKE. Religious Studies 16 (3):317-339.
    Social and political scientists, historians and others, have put forward a number of widely differing views concerning the ‘character’ of Islamic millenarian and/or Mahdist movements in Africa. The same is true of course with regard to the opinions ofscholars concerning the transformative capacity of Islam as an ideology. In this paper I want to look at one aspect only of Islamic millenarianism in the West African context, viz. its allegedly revolutionary character.
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  12. B. Clarke (unknown). The Marriage of John Locke's 'Wife', Elizabeth Clarke. Locke Studies 25:93.
     
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  13. Bridget Clarke (2008). Thomas Stringer, Locke, Shaftesbury, and Edward Clarke: New Archival Discoveries. Locke Studies 8:171-199.
     
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  14. Desiderius Erasmus & John Clarke (1699). Colloquiorum ... Familiarium Opus Aureum, Cum Scholiis Quibusdam Antehac Non Editis. Ed. Omnium Absolutissima [by J. Clarke]. [REVIEW]
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  15. Desiderius Erasmus & John Clarke (1759). Erasmi Colloquia Selecta; or, the Select Colloquies of Erasmus, with an Engl. Tr. By J. Clarke. 15th Ed.
     
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  16. James F. Ross & Francis Palmer Clarke (1971). Inquiries Into Medieval Philosophy a Collection in Honor of Francis P. Clarke. --. Greenwood Pub. Co.
     
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  17. Randolph Clarke (2006). Libertarian Accounts of Free Will. Oxford University Press Usa.
    This comprehensive study offers a balanced assessment of libertarian accounts of free will. Bringing to bear recent work on action, causation, and causal explanation, Clarke defends a type of event-causal view from popular objections concerning rationality and diminished control. He subtly explores the extent to which event-causal accounts can secure the things for the sake of which we value free will, judging their success here to be limited. Clarke then sets out a highly original agent-causal account, (...)
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  18.  31
    J. J. Clarke (1997). Oriental Enlightenment: The Encounter Between Asian and Western Thought. Routledge.
    The West has long had an ambivalent attitude toward the philosophical traditions of the East. Voltaire claimed that the East is the civilization "to which the West owes everything", yet C.S. Peirce was contemptuous of the "monstrous mysticism of the East". And despite the current trend toward globalizations, there is still a reluctance to take seriously the intellectual inheritance of South and East Asia. Oriental Enlightenment challenges this Eurocentric prejudice. J. J. Clarke examines the role played by the (...)
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  19. Samuel Clarke (1998). A Demonstration of the Being and Attributes of God and Other Writings. Cambridge University Press.
    Samuel Clarke was by far the most gifted and influential Newtonian philosopher of his generation, and A Demonstration of the Being and Attributes of God, which constituted the 1704 Boyle Lectures, was one of the most important works of the first half of the eighteenth century, generating a great deal of controversy about the relation between space and God, the nature of divine necessary existence, the adequacy of the Cosmological Argument, agent causation, and the immateriality of the soul. (...)
     
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  20. Desmond M. Clarke (1989). Occult Powers and Hypotheses: Cartesian Natural Philosophy Under Louis Xiv. Oxford University Press.
    This book analyses the concept of scientific explanation developed by French disciples of Descartes in the period 1660-1700. Clarke examines the views of authors such as Malebranche and Rohault, as well as those of less well-known authors such as Cordemoy, Gadroys, Poisson and R'egis. These Cartesian natural philosophers developed an understanding of scientific explanation as necessarily hypothetical, and, while they contributed little to new scientific discoveries, they made a lasting contribution to our concept of explanation--generations of scientists in (...)
     
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  21. Steve Clarke (2007). Conspiracy Theories and the Internet: Controlled Demolition and Arrested Development. Episteme 4 (2):167-180.
    Abstract Following Clarke (2002), a Lakatosian approach is used to account for the epistemic development of conspiracy theories. It is then argued that the hypercritical atmosphere of the internet has slowed down the development of conspiracy theories, discouraging conspiracy theorists from articulating explicit versions of their favoured theories, which could form the hard core of Lakatosian research pro grammes. The argument is illustrated with a study of the “controlled demolition” theory of the collapse of three towers at the (...)
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  22.  2
    Murray Clarke (2004). Reconstructing Reason and Representation. A Bradford Book.
    In Reconstructing Reason and Representation, Murray Clarke offers a detailed study of the philosophical implications of evolutionary psychology. In doing so, he offers new solutions to key problems in epistemology and philosophy of mind, including misrepresentation and rationality. He proposes a naturalistic approach to reason and representation that is informed by evolutionary psychology, and, expanding on the massive modularity thesis advanced in work by Leda Cosmides and John Tooby, argues for a modular, adapticist account of misrepresentation and knowledge. (...)
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  23.  49
    Desmond M. Clarke (2003). Descartes's Theory of Mind. Oxford University Press.
    Descartes is possibly the most famous of all writers on the mind, but his theory of mind has been almost universally misunderstood, because his philosophy has not been seen in the context of his scientific work. Desmond Clarke offers a radical and convincing rereading, undoing the received perception of Descartes as the chief defender of mind/body dualism. For Clarke, the key is to interpret his philosophical efforts as an attempt to reconcile his scientific pursuits with the (...)
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  24. Katherine Clarke (2001). Between Geography and History: Hellenistic Constructions of the Roman World. OUP Oxford.
    Katherine Clarke explores three authors who wrote about the rise of the Roman Empire - Polybius, Posidonius, and Strabo. She examines the overlap between geography and history in their work, and considers how pre-existing traditions were used but transformed in order to describe the new world of Rome.
     
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  25. D. S. Clarke (2007). Some Pragmatist Themes. Lexington Books.
    In Some Pragmatist Themes, D. S. Clarke shows the relevance of classical pragmatism to recent American philosophy. He outlines pragmatism's two central claims and then demonstrates how these claims generate views on issues dominating contemporary discussions including the nature of truth, the structure of moral reasoning, and the social role of philosophy.
     
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  26.  54
    D. S. Clarke (2003). Panpsychism and the Religious Attitude. State University of New York Press.
    In this bold, challenging book, D. S. Clarke outlines reasons for accepting panpsychism and defends the doctrine against its critics.
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  27.  15
    David Clarke (2011). Music, Phenomenology, Time Consciousness: Meditations After Husserl. In David Clarke & Eric F. Clarke (eds.), Music and Consciousness: Philosophical, Psychological, and Cultural Perspectives. Oxford University Press 1.
    David Clarke examines the complex relationship between phenomenological and semiological understandings of music and consciousness through the window of time. He also explores the polar tension between Husserl's phenomenology and Derrida's critique of it, considering what the experience of music might have to offer in response to the crucial question of what is most primordial or essential to consciousness: the unceasing, differential movement of meaning, or some pure flow of subjectivity that underpins all our experience.
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  28. Desmond M. Clarke (2005). Descarten Theory of Mind. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 67 (1):187-188.
    Descartes is possibly the most famous of all writers on the mind, but his theory of mind has been almost universally misunderstood, because his philosophy has not been seen in the context of his scientific work. Desmond Clarke offers a radical and convincing rereading, undoing the received perception of Descartes as the chief defender of mind/body dualism. For Clarke, the key is to interpret his philosophical efforts as an attempt to reconcile his scientific pursuits with the (...)
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  29.  5
    Moira Clarke (2015). Science Denialism: Creationism. Australian Humanist, The 116:6.
    Clarke, Moira On the East coast of America, every 13 or 17 years, billions of red-eyed magicicadas emerge from underground. For the next few weeks every tree resounds with a near-deafening symphony, a courting ritual that has been measured at 94 decibels. Finally, the resulting offspring burrow back into the earth, there to remain inactive for the exact same duration, 13 or 17 years.
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  30.  3
    Michael J. Clarke (1995). Ethical Dilemmas for Estate Agents. Business Ethics 4 (2):70–75.
    Research into the work of UK estate agents reveals a love‐hate attitude on the part of the public and profound ethical ambivalences. Dr Clarke is a member of the Department of Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work Studies, The University of Liverpool, POB 147, Liverpool L69 3BX. This article draws on his study Slippery Customers: Estate Agents, The Public and Regulation, Blackstone Press 1994, co‐authored with D. Smith and M. McConville.
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  31.  12
    Bruce Clarke (2011). Victorian Bodies in Heat. Metascience 20 (2):325-328.
    Victorian bodies in heat Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9489-x Authors Bruce Clarke, Department of English, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-3091, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  32.  2
    D. D. Clarke (1978). The Teaching of Medical Ethics: University College, Cork, Ireland. Journal of Medical Ethics 4 (1):36-39.
    Dolores Dooley Clarke describes how the course in medical ethics at University College, Cork is structured, how it has changed and how it is likely to change as time goes on. Originally, the students seemed to view it as an intrusion 'to be tolerated' in their programme of 'strictly medical' studies. However, having moved on from that and away from the lecturer always being a Roman Catholic priest as well as a member of the Philosophy Department, the students (...)
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  33.  1
    Michael J. Clarke (1995). FOCUS: Ethics in Need of Regulation. Business Ethics 4 (4):202–205.
    How much real impact on business behaviour is achieved by ethical debate and discussion? The author contends that little ethical change will come about unless it is the subject of regulation and institutions, as instanced in equal opportunities, corporate governance and the quality of financial services. Dr Clarke is a member of the Department of Sociology, University of Liverpool, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool L69 3BX.
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  34.  1
    Julia Clarke (1997). Shareholders and Corporate Community Involvement in Britain. Business Ethics 6 (4):201–207.
    Corporate community involvement is attracting increasing interest in Britain, but what do shareholders feel about this use of company assets? This timely survey of top UK corporate donors provides interesting data on current practice and explores the degree to which shareholders are consulted. The author is a member of the Department of Business Studies in the Faculty of Management and Business of The Manchester Metropolitan University, Aytoun Building, Aytoun Street, Manchester M1 3GH; e–mail j.clarke@mmu.ac.uk.
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  35. Desmond M. Clarke (2009). Berkeley: Philosophical Writings. Cambridge University Press.
    George Berkeley was a university teacher, a missionary, and later a Church of Ireland bishop. The over-riding objective of his long philosophical career was to counteract objections to religious belief that resulted from new philosophies associated with the Scientific Revolution. Accordingly, he argued against scepticism and atheism in the Principles and the Three Dialogues; he rejected theories of force in the Essay on Motion; he offered a new theory of meaning for religious language in Alciphron; and he modified his earlier (...)
     
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  36. Desmond M. Clarke (2012). Berkeley: Philosophical Writings. Cambridge University Press.
    George Berkeley was a university teacher, a missionary, and later a Church of Ireland bishop. The over-riding objective of his long philosophical career was to counteract objections to religious belief that resulted from new philosophies associated with the Scientific Revolution. Accordingly, he argued against scepticism and atheism in the Principles and the Three Dialogues; he rejected theories of force in the Essay on Motion; he offered a new theory of meaning for religious language in Alciphron; and he modified his earlier (...)
     
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  37. Desmond M. Clarke (1990). Descartes' Philosophy of Science. Penn State University Press.
    This major new study of Descartes explores a number of key issues, including his use of experience and reason in science; the metaphysical foundations of Cartesian science; the Cartesian concept of explanation and proof; and an empiricist interpretation of the _Regulae_ and the _Discourse_. Dr. Clarke argues that labels such as empiricism and rationalism are useless for understanding Descartes because, at least in his scientific methodology, he is very much an Aristotelian for whom reflection on ordinary experience is (...)
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  38. Desmond M. Clarke (2016). French Philosophy, 1572-1675. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Desmond M. Clarke presents a thematic history of French philosophy from the middle of the sixteenth century to the beginning of Louis XIV's reign. While the traditional philosophy of the schools was taught throughout this period by authors who have faded into permanent obscurity, a whole generation of writers who were not professional philosophers--some of whom never even attended a school or college--addressed issues that were prominent in French public life. Clarke explores such topics as the (...)
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  39. Bruce Clarke (2014). Neocybernetics and Narrative. Univ of Minnesota Press.
    _Neocybernetics and Narrative_ opens a new chapter in Bruce Clarke’s project of rethinking narrative and media through systems theory. Reconceiving interrelations among subjects, media, significations, and the social, this study demonstrates second-order systems theory’s potential to provide fresh insights into the familiar topics of media studies and narrative theory. A pioneer of systems narratology, Clarke offers readers a synthesis of the neocybernetic theories of cognition formulated by biologists Humberto Maturana and Francisco Varela, incubated by cyberneticist Heinz (...)
     
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  40. D. S. Clarke (1990). Sources of Semiotic: Readings with Commentary From Antiquity to the Present. Southern Illinois University Press.
    This book provides an introduction to semiotic through readings from classic works in the field. In contrast with descriptions of communication systems based on the methods of empirical linguistics and interpretive studies of artistic means of communication, this text delimits semiotic as a logical study with its foundations in the theories of Greek and medieval logicians and the classifications of Charles Peirce. Clarke defines semiotic as the general theory that attempts to specify the logical features of signs and (...)
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  41.  49
    W. Norris Clarke (2009). The Creative Retrieval of Saint Thomas Aquinas: Essays in Thomistic Philosophy, New and Old. Fordham University Press.
    Part I: Reprinted articles -- Twenty-fourth award of Aquinas medal by the American Catholic Philosophical Association to W. Norris Clarke, SJ -- Interpersonal dialogue : key to realism -- Causality and time -- System : a new category of being -- A curious blind spot in the Anglo American tradition of antitheistic argument -- The problem of the reality and multiplicity of divine ideas in Christian neoplatonism -- Is the ethical eudaimonism of Saint Thomas too self-centered? -- Conscience (...)
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  42. Desmond M. Clarke (2013). The Equality of the Sexes: Three Feminist Texts of the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Desmond M. Clarke presents new translations, from French and Latin, of three of the first feminist tracts to support explicitly the equality of men and women: Marie le Jars de Gournay's The Equality of Men and Women, Anna Maria van Schurman's Dissertation, and François Poulain de la Barre's Physical and Moral Discourse concerning the Equality of Both Sexes. These works transformed the language and conceptual framework in which questions about women's equality were subsequently discussed. This edition includes new (...)
     
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  43. Desmond M. Clarke (2013). The Equality of the Sexes: Three Feminist Texts of the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Desmond M. Clarke presents new translations, from French and Latin, of three of the first feminist tracts to support explicitly the equality of men and women: Marie le Jars de Gournay's The Equality of Men and Women, Anna Maria van Schurman's Dissertation, and François Poulain de la Barre's Physical and Moral Discourse concerning the Equality of Both Sexes. These works transformed the language and conceptual framework in which questions about women's equality were subsequently discussed. This edition includes new (...)
     
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  44. W. Norris Clarke (1988). The Universe as Journey. In W. Norris Clarke & Gerald A. McCool (eds.), The Universe as Journey: Conversations with W. Norris Clarke, S.J. Fordham University Press
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  45. Randolph Clarke (2003). Libertarian Accounts of Free Will. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This comprehensive study offers a balanced assessment of libertarian accounts of free will.
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  46.  66
    Randolph Clarke (2008). Intrinsic Finks. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (232):512–518.
    Dispositions can be finkish, prone to disappear in circumstances that would commonly trigger their characteristic manifestations. Can a disposition be finkish because of something intrinsic to the object possessing that disposition? Sungho Choi has argued that this is not possible, and many agree. Here it is argued that no good case has been made for ruling out the possibility of intrinsic finks; on the contrary, there is good reason to accept it.
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  47. Randolph Clarke (2005). Agent Causation and the Problem of Luck. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (3):408-421.
    : On a standard libertarian account of free will, an agent acts freely on some occasion only if there remains, until the action is performed, some chance that the agent will do something else instead right then. These views face the objection that, in such a case, it is a matter of luck whether the agent does one thing or another. This paper considers the problem of luck as it bears on agent‐causal libertarian accounts. A view of this type is (...)
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  48. Lynn Clarke (2004). Talk About Talk: Promises, Risks, and a Proposition Out Of. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (4):317-325.
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  49. Randolph Clarke (2005). On an Argument for the Impossibility of Moral Responsibility. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):13-24.
    Galen Strawson has published several versions of an argument to the effect that moral responsibility is impossible, whether determinism is true or not. Few philosophers have been persuaded by the argument, which Strawson remarks is often dismissed “as wrong, or irrelevant, or fatuous, or too rapid, or an expression of metaphysical megalomania.” I offer here a two-part explanation of why Strawson’s argument has impressed so few. First, as he usually states it, the argument is lacking at least one key premise. (...)
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  50. Thompson Clarke (1972). The Legacy of Skepticism. Journal of Philosophy 64 (20):754-769.
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