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  1. Linda Mealey (2006). The Sociobiology of Sociopathy: An Integrated Evolutionary Model.(Vol 18, Pg 523, 1995). Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):523-541.
    Sociopaths are members of society in two senses: politically, they draw our attention because of the inordinate amount of crime they commit, and psychologically, they hold our fascination because most ofus cannot fathom the cold, detached way they repeatedly harm and manipulate others. Proximate explanations from behavior genetics, child development, personality theory, learning theory, and social psychology describe a complex interaction of genetic and physiological risk factors with demographic and micro environmental variables that predispose a portion of the population to (...)
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  2. Linda Mealey & Stuart Kinner (2001). The Perception-Action Model of Empathy and Psychopathic “Cold-Heartedness”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):42-43.
    The Perception-Action Model of empathy (PAM) is both sufficiently broad and sufficiently detailed to be able to describe and accommodate a wide range of phenomena – including the apparent “cold-heartedness” or lack of empathy of psychopaths. We show how the physiological, cognitive, and emotional elements of the PAM map onto known and hypothesized attributes of the psychopathic personality.
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  3. Linda Mealey (2000). Anorexia: A “Losing” Strategy? [REVIEW] Human Nature 11 (1):105-116.
    Several theorists have tried to model anorexia on Wasser and Barash’s (1983) “reproductive suppression model” (RSM). According to the RSM, individual females adaptively suppress their reproductive functioning under conditions of social or physiological stress. From this perspective, mild anorexia is viewed as an adaptive response to modern conditions; more severe anorexia is viewed as an adaptation gone awry. Previous models have not, however, examined the full richness of the RSM. Specifically, Wasser and Barash documented not only self-imposed reproductive suppression, but (...)
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  4. Linda Mealey (2000). Mating Strategies as Game Theory: Changing Rules? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):613-613.
    Human behavior can be analyzed using game theory models. Complex games may involve different rules for different players and may allow players to change identity (and therefore, rules) according to complex contingencies. From this perspective, mating behaviors can be viewed as strategic “plays” in a complex “mating game,” with players varying tactics in response to changes in the game's payoff matrix.
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  5. Linda Mealey (2000). The Illusory Function of Dreams: Another Example of Cognitive Bias. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):971-972.
    Patterns of dream content indicating a predominance of themes relating to threat are likely to reflect biases in dream recall and dream scoring techniques. Even if this pattern is not artifactual, it is yet reflective of threat-related biases in our conscious and nonconscious waking cognition, and is not special to dreams. [Revonsuo].
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  6. Linda Mealey (1999). Evolutionary Models of Female Intrasexual Competition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):234-234.
    Female competition generally takes nonviolent form, but includes intense verbal and nonverbal harassment that has profound social and physiological consequences. The evolutionary ecological model of competitive reproductive suppression in human females, might profitably be applied to explain a range of contemporary phenomena, including anorexia.
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  7. Bernadette Klopp & Linda Mealey (1998). Experimental Mood Manipulation Does Not Induce Change in Preference for Natural Landscapes. Human Nature 9 (4):391-399.
    According to evolutionary theory, emotions are psychological mechanisms that have evolved to enhance fitness in specific situations by motivating appropriate (adaptive) behavior. Taking this perspective, a previous study examined the relationship between mood and preference for natural environments. It reported that participants’ anxiety level was associated with a preference for landscapes offering what Appleton called "refuge," while participants’ anger and cheerfulness were both associated with a preference for landscapes offering what Appleton called "prospect." We attempted to replicate these results and (...)
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  8. Linda Mealey (1998). Testosterone-Aggression Relationship: An Exemplar of Interactionism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):380-381.
    Mazur & Booth provide life scientists with an example of the multilevel biopsychosocial approach. Research paradigms have to become more flexible and multidisciplinary if we are to free ourselves from the nature–nurture dichotomy that we have long agreed was simplistic and shortsighted. I point out a variety of kinds of interactions that may be the next frontier for behavioral scientists.
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  9. Virginia Slaughter & Linda Mealey (1998). Seeing is Not (Necessarily) Believing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):130-130.
    We doubt that theory of mind can be sufficiently demonstrated without reliance on verbal tests. Where language is the major tool of social manipulation, an effective theory of mind must use language as an input. We suspect, therefore, that in this context, prelinguistic human and nonhuman minds are more alike than are human pre- and postlinguistic minds.
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  10. Linda Mealey (1997). Heritability, Theory of Mind, and the Nature of Normality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):527-531.
    It is impossible to discuss the constructs and in a single coherent essay. The following three rejoinders address each of these exceedingly complex constructs individually, as each relates to the two-path model of sociopathy and psychopathy.
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  11. Linda Mealey (1995). Enhanced Processing of Threatening Stimuli: The Case of Face Recognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):304.
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  12. Linda Mealey (1995). Primary Sociopathy (Psychopathy) is a Type, Secondary is Not. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):579-599.
    Recent studies lend support to the two-pathway model of the evolution of sociopathy with evidence that: 1) psychopathy (primary sociopathy) is a discrete type and 2) in general, sociopaths have relatively high levels of reproductive success. Hare's Psychopathy Checklist may provide a start for the revision of terminology that will be necessary to distinguish between primary and secondary trajectories.
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  13. Linda Mealey (1993). Sociobiology or Evolutionary Psychology? The Debate Continues. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):300.
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  14. Linda Mealey (1992). Alternative Adaptive Models of Rape. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):397-398.
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  15. Linda Mealey (1992). Are Monkeys Nomothetic or Idiographic? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):161.
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  16. Linda Mealey (1992). Individual Differences in Reproductive Tactics: Cuing, Assessment, and Facultative Strategies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):105-106.
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