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Profile: Linda Zagzebski (University of Oklahoma)
  1. Linda Zagzebski, Is It Reasonable to Believe in God?
    When philosophers talk about whether it is reasonable to believe in God, they might take the high intellectual approach of presenting one or more of the traditional arguments for God’s existence, all of which have contemporary forms. Or they might take the opposite approach made popular by some Calvinist philosophers such as Alvin Plantinga who argue that a person can be reasonable in believing something without reasons to support it, and belief in God is like that. There are many beliefs (...)
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  2. Linda Zagzebski (forthcoming). Foreknowledge and Free Will. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  3. Linda Zagzebski (forthcoming). Plantinga's Warranted Christian Belief and the Aquinas/Calvin Model.”. Philosophical Books.
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  4. Linda Zagzebski (2013). A Defense of Epistemic Authority. Res Philosophica 90 (2):293-306.
    In this paper I argue that epistemic authority can be justified in the same way as political authority in the tradition of political liberalism. I propose principlesof epistemic authority modeled on the general principles of authority proposed by Joseph Raz. These include the Content-Independence thesis, the Pre-emption thesis, the Dependency thesis, and the Normal Justification thesis. The focus is on the authority of a person’s beliefs, although the principles can be applied to the authority of another person’s testimony and the (...)
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  5. Linda Zagzebski (2013). Intellectual Autonomy. Philosophical Issues 23 (1):244-261.
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  6. Linda Zagzebski (2012). Epistemic Authority: A Theory of Trust, Authority, and Autonomy in Belief. Oup Usa.
    In this book Zagzebski gives an extended argument that the self-reflective person is committed to belief on authority. Epistemic authority is compatible with autonomy, but epistemic self-reliance is incoherent. She argues that epistemic and emotional self-trust are rational and inescapable, that consistent self-trust commits us to trust in others, and that among those we are committed to trusting are some whom we ought to treat as epistemic authorities, modeled on the well-known principles of authority of Joseph Raz. These principles apply (...)
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  7. Linda Zagzebski (2012). Traf religijny. Roczniki Filozoficzne 60 (2):141-162.
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  8. Linda Zagzebski (2011). Epistemic Self-Trust and the Consensus Gentium Argument. In Kelly James Clark & Raymond J. VanArragon (eds.), Evidence and Religious Belief. Oxford University Press.
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  9. Linda Zagzebski (2011). First Person and Third Person Reasons and Religious Epistemology. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (2):285 - 304.
    In this paper I argue that there are two kinds of epistemic reasons. One kind is irreducibly first personal -- what I call deliberative reasons. The other kind is third personal -- what I call theoretical reasons. I argue that attending to this distinction illuminates a host of problems in epistemology in general and in religious epistemology in particular. These problems include (a) the way religious experience operates as a reason for religious belief, (b) how we ought to understand religious (...)
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  10. Linda Zagzebski (2010). Exemplarist Virtue Theory. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):41-57.
    Abstract: In this essay I outline a radical kind of virtue theory I call exemplarism, which is foundational in structure but which is grounded in exemplars of moral goodness, direct reference to which anchors all the moral concepts in the theory. I compare several different kinds of moral theory by the way they relate the concepts of the good, a right act, and a virtue. In the theory I propose, these concepts, along with the concepts of a duty and of (...)
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  11. Linda Zagzebski (2010). The Rule of St. Benedict and Modern Liberal Authority. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 2 (1):65 - 84.
    In this paper I examine the sixth century ’Rule of St. Benedict’, and argue that the authority structure of Benedictine communities as described in that document satisfies well-known principles of authority defended by Joseph Raz. This should lead us to doubt the common assumption that premodern models of authority violate the modern ideal of the autonomy of the self. I suggest that what distinguishes modern liberal authority from Benedictine authority is not the principles that justify it, but rather the first-order (...)
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  12. Linda Zagzebski (2009). On Epistemology. Wadsworth.
    These books will prove valuable to philosophy teachers and their students as well as to other readers who share a general interest in philosophy.
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  13. Linda Zagzebski & Timothy Miller (eds.) (2009). Readings in Philosophy of Religion: Ancient to Contemporary. Wiley-Blackwell.
    The philosophical treatment of religion -- Classical arguments for theism. Teleological arguments -- Cosmological arguments -- Ontological arguments -- Other approaches to religious belief. Experience and revelation as grounds for religious belief -- Fideism -- Naturalistic re-interpretations of religious belief -- Who or what is God? -- Fate, freedom, and foreknowledge -- Religion and morality. Is religion needed for morality? -- Divine command theory and divine motivation theory -- Natural law -- The problem of evil -- Death and immortality. Is (...)
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  14. Linda Zagzebski (2008). Omnisubjectivity. In Jon Kvanvig (ed.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion. Oxford. 1--231.
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  15. Linda Zagzebski (2008). Przedwiedza a wolna wola. Roczniki Filozoficzne 56 (2):465-490.
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  16. Linda Zagzebski (2008). Self-Trust and the Diversity of Religions. In Philip L. Quinn & Paul J. Weithman (eds.), Liberal Faith: Essays in Honor of Philip Quinn. University of Notre Dame Press.
     
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  17. Linda Zagzebski (2008). The Search for the Source of Epistemic Good. In Duncan Pritchard & Ram Neta (eds.), Arguing About Knowledge. Routledge. 55.
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  18. Linda Zagzebski (2008). Virtues of the Mind, Selections. In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Epistemology: An Anthology. Blackwell Pub.. 442.
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  19. Joshua Seachris & Linda Zagzebski (2007). Weighing Evils: The C. S. Lewis Approach. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (2):81 - 88.
    It is often argued that the great quantity of evil in our world makes God’s existence less likely than a lesser quantity would, and this, presumably, because the probability that some evils are gratuitous increases as the overall quantity of evil increases. Often, an additive approach to quantifying evil is employed in such arguments. In this paper, we examine C. S. Lewis’ objection to the additive approach, arguing that although he is correct to reject this approach, there is a sense (...)
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  20. Linda Zagzebski (2007). Ethical and Epistemic Egoism and the Ideal of Autonomy. Episteme 4 (3):252-263.
    In this paper I distinguish three degrees of epistemic egoism, each of which has an ethical analogue, and I argue that all three are incoherent. Since epistemic autonomy is frequently identified with one of these forms of epistemic egoism, it follows that epistemic autonomy as commonly understood is incoherent. I end with a brief discussion of the idea of moral autonomy and suggest that its component of epistemic autonomy in the realm of the moral is problematic.
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  21. Linda Zagzebski (2007). Philosophy of Religion: An Historical Introduction. Blackwell Pub..
    An accessible and engaging introduction to the philosophy of religion. Written with verve and clarity by a leading philosopher and contributor to the field Places key issues and debates in the philosophy of religion in their historical contexts, highlighting the conditions that led to the development of the field Addresses the core topics, among them the the existence of God, the problem of evil, death and the afterlife, and the problem of religious diversity Rich with argument, yet never obtrusive Forms (...)
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  22. Linda Zagzebski (2006). Ideal Agents and Ideal Observers in Epistemology. In Stephen Hetherington (ed.), Epistemology Futures. Clarendon Press.
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  23. Linda Zagzebski (2006). The Admirable Life and the Desirable Life. In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  24. William P. Alston, Laurence Bonjour, Carl Ginet, Alvin I. Goldman, John Greco, George I. Mavrodes, Philip L. Quinn, Alessandra Tanesini, Nicholas Wolterstorff & Linda Zagzebski (2005). Perspectives on the Philosophy of William P. Alston. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  25. Linda Zagzebski (2005). Morality and Religion. In William J. Wainwright (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press.
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  26. Linda Zagzebski (2005). Sleeping Beauty and the Afterlife. In Andrew Dole & Andrew Chignell (eds.), God and the Ethics of Belief: New Essays in Philosophy of Religion. Cambridge University Press.
  27. Linda Zagzebski (2004). Epistemic Value and the Primacy of What We Care About. Philosophical Papers 33 (3):353-377.
    Abstract In this paper I argue that to understand the ethics of belief we need to put it in a context of what we care about. Epistemic values always arise from something we care about and they arise only from something we care about. It is caring that gives rise to the demand to be epistemically conscientious. The reason morality puts epistemic demands on us is that we care about morality. But there may be a (small) class of beliefs which (...)
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  28. Linda Zagzebski (2004). Divine Motivation Theory. Cambridge Univeristy Press.
    Because she is widely regarded in the field of contemporary philosophy of religion, Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski's latest book will be a major contribution to ethical theory and theological ethics. At the core of her work lies a new form of virtue theory based on the emotions. Distinct from deontological, consequentialist and teleological virtue theories, this theory has a particular theological Christian foundation.
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  29. Linda Zagzebski (2004). Epistemic Value Monism. In Greco John (ed.), Ernest Sosa and His Critics. Oxford: Blackwell. 190--198.
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  30. Linda Zagzebski (2004). Omniscience, Time, and Freedom. In William Mann (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Religion. Blackwell Pub.. 3-26.
  31. Michael R. DePaul & Linda Zagzebski (eds.) (2003). Intellectual Virtue: Perspectives From Ethics and Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    The idea of a virtue has traditionally been important in ethics, but only recently has gained attention as an idea that can explain how we ought to form beliefs as well as how we ought to act. Moral philosophers and epistemologists have different approaches to the idea of intellectual virtue; here, Michael DePaul and Linda Zagzebski bring work from both fields together for the first time to address all of the important issues. It will be required reading for anyone working (...)
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  32. Linda Zagzebski (2003). The Search for the Source of Epistemic Good. Metaphilosophy 34 (1-2):12-28.
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  33. Linda Zagzebski (2003). Emotion and Moral Judgment. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (1):104–124.
    This paper argues that an emotion is a state of affectively perceiving its intentional object as falling under a "thick affective concept" A, a concept that combines cognitive and affective aspects in a way that cannot be pulled apart. For example, in a state of pity an object is seen as pitiful, where to see something as pitiful is to be in a state that is both cognitive and affective. One way of expressing an emotion is to assert that the (...)
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  34. Linda Zagzebski (2003). Epistemic Trust. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 10 (2):113-117.
    The value of epistemic trust has been neglected, as Townsley rightly observes, but I think a virtue epistemology of the kind! endorse is well suited to provide a framework for understanding it. The Cassandra of Greek legend illustrates the complex relationships among epistemic and non-epistemic goods, as welt as the fragility of knowledge. I think her case leads us to a more radical conclusion than the one Townsley proposes.
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  35. Linda Zagzebski (2003). Intellectual Motivation and the Good of Truth. In Linda Zagzebski & Michael DePaul (eds.), Intellectual Virtue: Perspectives From Ethics and Epistemology. New York: Oxford University Press. 135--154.
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  36. Linda Zagzebski (2002). Omniscience and the Arrow of Time. Faith and Philosophy 19 (4):503-519.
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  37. Linda Zagzebski (2002). Obligation, Good Motives, and the Good. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (2):453 - 458.
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  38. Linda Zagzebski (2002). Recent Work on Divine Foreknowledge and Free Will. In Robert Kane (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Free Will. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 45-64.
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  39. Abrol Fairweather & Linda Zagzebski (eds.) (2001). Virtue Epistemology: Essays on Epistemic Virtue and Responsibility. Oxford University Press.
    Virtue Epistemology is a new movement receiving the bulk of recent attention from top epistemologists and ethicists; this volume reflects the best work in that vein. Included are unpublished articles by such eminent philosophers as Robert Audi, Simon Blackburn, Alvin Goldman, Christopher Hookway, Keith Lehrer, and Ernest Sosa.
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  40. Linda Zagzebski (2001). The Uniqueness of Persons. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (3):401 - 423.
    Persons are thought to have a special kind of value, often called "dignity," which, according to Kant, makes them both infinitely valuable and irreplaceably valuable. The author aims to identify what makes a person a person in a way that can explain both aspects of dignity. She considers five definitions of "person": (1) an individual substance of a rational nature (Boethius), (2) a self-conscious being (Locke), (3) a being with the capacity to act for ends (Kant), (4) a being with (...)
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  41. Linda Zagzebski (2001). Must Knowers Be Agents. In Abrol Fairweather & Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski (eds.), Virtue Epistemology: Essays on Epistemic Virtue and Responsibility. Oxford University Press. 142--57.
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  42. Linda Zagzebski (2001). Religious Diversity and Social Responsibility. Logos 4 (1).
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  43. Linda Zagzebski (2001). Recovering Understanding. In M. Steup (ed.), Knowledge, Truth, and Duty: Essays on Epistemic Justification, Responsibility, and Virtue. Oxford University Press.
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  44. Linda Zagzebski (2000). Does Libertarian Freedom Require Alternate Possibilities? Philosopical Perspectives 14 (s14):231-248.
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  45. Linda Zagzebski (2000). From Reliabilism to Virtue Epistemology. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 5:173-179.
    In Virtues of the Mind I object to process reliabilism on the grounds that it does not explain the good of knowledge in addition to the good of true belief. In this paper I wish to develop this objection in more detail, and will then argue that this problem pushes us first in the direction of two offspring of process reliabilism—faculty reliabilism and proper functionalism, and, finally, to a true virtue epistemology.
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  46. Linda Zagzebski (2000). Précis of Virtues of the Mind. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (1):169-177.
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  47. Linda Zagzebski (2000). Responses. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (1):207-219.
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  48. Linda Zagzebski (2000). Review: Précis of Virtues of the Mind. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (1):169 - 177.
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  49. Linda Zagzebski (2000). Review: Responses. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (1):207 - 219.
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  50. Linda Zagzebski & Abrol Fairweather (eds.) (2000). Virtue Epistemology: Essays on Epistemic Virtue and Responsibility. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Virtue Epistemology is a new movement receiving much recent attention from top epistemologists and ethicists; this volume reflects the best work in that vein. Included are unpublished articles by such eminent philosophers as Robert Audi, Simon Blackburn, Alvin Goldman, Christopher Hookway, Keith Lehrer, and Ernest Sosa.
     
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