Search results for 'Lindsay Kistler Mattock' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lindsay Kistler Mattock (2010). From Film Restoration to Digital Emulation. Journal of Information Ethics 19 (1):74-85.score: 870.0
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  2. Max Kistler (2007). Causation and Laws of Nature. In Michael Beaney (ed.), The Analytic Turn: Analysis in Early Analytic Philosophy and Phenomenology. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Causation is important. It is, as Hume said, the cement of the universe, and lies at the heart of our conceptual structure. Causation is one of the most fundamental tools we have for organizing our apprehension of the external world and ourselves. But philosophers' disagreement about the correct interpretation of causation is as limitless as their agreement about its importance. The history of attempts to elucidate the nature of this concept and to situate it with respect to other fundamental concepts (...)
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  3. Max Kistler (2010). Mechanisms and Downward Causation. Philosophical Psychology 22 (5):595-609.score: 30.0
    Experimental investigation of mechanisms seems to make use of causal relations that cut across levels of composition. In bottom-up experiments, one intervenes on parts of a mechanism to observe the whole; in top-down experiments, one intervenes on the whole mechanism to observe certain parts of it. It is controversial whether such experiments really make use of interlevel causation, and indeed whether the idea of causation across levels is even conceptually coherent. Craver and Bechtel have suggested that interlevel causal claims can (...)
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  4. Max Kistler (2005). Necessary Laws. In Jan Faye, Paul Needham, Uwe Scheffler & Max Urchs (eds.), Nature’s Principles. Springer. 201-227.score: 30.0
    In the first part of this paper, I argue against the view that laws of nature are contingent, by attacking a necessary condition for its truth within the framework of a conception of laws as relations between universals. I try to show that there is no independent reason to think that universals have an essence independent of their nomological properties. However, such a non-qualitative essence is required to make sense of the idea that different laws link the same universals in (...)
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  5. Max Kistler (2005). Lowe's Argument for Dualism From Mental Causation. Philosophia 33 (1-4):319-329.score: 30.0
  6. John M. Kistler (2002). People Promoting and People Opposing Animal Rights: In Their Own Words. Greenwood Press.score: 30.0
    Explores the many issues surrounding the animal rights and animal welfare movements through personal interview responses from rights activists.
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  7. Max Kistler, Multi-Track Dispositions and Laws of Nature.score: 30.0
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  8. Max Kistler (2005). Is Functional Reduction Logical Reduction? Croatian Journal of Philosophy 5 (14):219-234.score: 30.0
    The functionalist conception of mental properties, together with their multiple realizability, is often taken to entail their irreducibility. It might seem that the only way to revise that judgement is to weaken the requirements traditionally imposed on reduction. However, Jaegwon Kim has recently argued that we should, on the contrary, strengthen those requirements, and construe reduction as what I propose to call “logical reduction”, a model of reduction inspired by emergentism. Moreover, Kim claims that what he calls “functional reduction” allows (...)
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  9. Chris Lindsay (2005). Reid on Scepticism About Agency and the Self. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 3 (1):19-33.score: 30.0
    Maria Alvarez has argued that Thomas Reid’s account of action gives rise to a sceptical worry concerning one’s awareness of one’s own actions. Against this, I argue that Alvarez overstates the sceptical consequences of Reid’s admission that there is room for doubt about the actual causes of bodily movements; rather than generating a serious epistemological problem for his theory, it can be given a more plausible reading that serves to defuse the sceptical worry.
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  10. Max Kistler (1999). Multiple Realization, Reduction and Mental Properties. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 13 (2):135 – 149.score: 30.0
    This paper tries to remove some obstacles standing in the way of considering mental properties as both genuine natural kinds and causally efficacious rather than epiphenomena. As the case of temperature shows, it is not justified to conclude from a property being multiply realizable to it being irreducible. Yet Kim's argument to the effect that if a property is multiply realizable with a heterogeneous reduction base then it cannot be a natural kind and possesses only derivative “epiphenomenal” causal efficacy is (...)
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  11. John M. Kistler (2000). Animal Rights: A Subject Guide, Bibliography, and Internet Companion. Greenwood Press.score: 30.0
    Presents an introduction to the subject, suggestions on searching the Internet, and a bibliography of literature on animal nature, fatal and nonfatal uses, ...
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  12. R. B. Lindsay (1971). The Concept of Energy and its Early Historical Development. Foundations of Physics 1 (4):383-393.score: 30.0
    The concept of energy, the premier concept of physics and indeed of all science, is here investigated from the standpoint of its early historical origin and the philosophical implications thereof. The fundamental assumption is made that the root of the concept is the notion of invariance or constancy in the midst of change. Salient points in the development of this idea are presented from ancient times up to the publication of Lagrange'sMécanique Analytique (1788).
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  13. Max Kistler (2000). Source and Channel in the Informational Theory of Mental Content. Facta Philosophica 2 (2):213-36.score: 30.0
    With the aim of giving a naturalistic foundation to the notion of mental representation, Fred Dretske (1981;1988) has put forward and developed the idea that the relation between a representation and its intentional content is grounded on an informational relation. In this explanatory model, mental representations are conceived of as states of organisms which a learning process has selected to play a functional role: a necessary condition for fulfilling this role is that the organism or some proper part of it (...)
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  14. Max Kistler, Colours and Appearances as Powers and Manifestations.score: 30.0
    Humans have only finite discriminatory capacities. This simple fact seems to be incompatible with the existence of appearances. As many authors have noted, the hypothesis that appearances exist seems to be refuted by reductio: Let A, B, C be three uniformly coloured surfaces presented to a subject in optimal viewing conditions, such that A, B, and C resemble one another perfectly except with respect to their colours. Their colours differ slightly in the following way: the difference between A and B (...)
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  15. Ronald A. Lindsay (2009). Oregon's Experience: Evaluating the Record. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (3):19 – 27.score: 30.0
    Prior to passage of the Oregon Death with Dignity Act, opponents of assistance in dying argued that legalization would have serious harmful consequences. Specifically, they argued that the quality and availability of palliative care would decline, that the harms of legalization would affect certain vulnerable groups disproportionately, that legal assisted dying could not be confined to the competent terminally ill who voluntarily request assistance, and that the practice would result in frequent abuses. Data from Oregon's decade-long experience decisively refute the (...)
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  16. Peter Lindsay (2002). The 'Disembodied Self' in Political Theory: The Communitarians, Macpherson and Marx. Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (2):191-211.score: 30.0
    The communitarian critique of liberal agency is reminiscent of two earlier critiques: C. B. Macpherson's theory of possessive individualism and Marx's theory of alienation. As with the communitarian critique, Macpherson and Marx saw the liberal individual as being in some way 'disembodied'. Where they differed from communitarians was in the attention they paid to the actual social relations that gave rise to such an image. The comparison is thus fruitful because the emphasis Macpherson and Marx give to the concrete circumstances (...)
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  17. Max Kistler (1998). Reducing Causality to Transmission. Erkenntnis 48 (1):1-25.score: 30.0
    The idea that causation can be reduced to transmission of an amount of some conserved quantity between events is spelled out and defended against important objections. Transmission is understood as a symmetrical relation of copresence in two distinct events. The actual asymmetry of causality has its origin in the asymmetrical character of certain irreversible physical processes and then spreads through the causal net. This conception is compatible with the possibility of backwards causation and with a causal theory of time. Genidentity, (...)
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  18. Ronald A. Lindsay (2005). Slaves, Embryos, and Nonhuman Animals: Moral Status and the Limitations of Common Morality Theory. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (4):323-346.score: 30.0
    : Common morality theory must confront apparent counterexamples from the history of morality, such as the widespread acceptance of slavery in prior eras, that suggest core norms have changed over time. A recent defense of common morality theory addresses this problem by drawing a distinction between the content of the norms of the common morality and the range of individuals to whom these norms apply. This distinction is successful in reconciling common morality theory with practices such as slavery, but only (...)
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  19. Max Kistler (2003). Laws of Nature, Exceptions and Tropes. Philosophia Scientiae 7 (2):189-219.score: 30.0
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  20. Max Kistler (2006). New Perspectives on Reduction and Emergence in Physics, Biology and Psychology. Synthese 151 (3):311 - 312.score: 30.0
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  21. Max Kistler (2009). Cognition and Neurophysiology: Mechanism, Reduction, and Pluralism. Philosophical Psychology 22 (5):539-541.score: 30.0
    The papers collected in this volume explore some of the powers and limitations of the concept of mechanism for the scientific understanding of cognitive systems, and aim at bringing together some of the most recent developments in the philosophical understanding of the relation of cognition to neuroscience. Earlier versions of most papers have been presented at a workshop held in Paris on June 19th, 2006, which was organized by Institut Jean Nicod and supported by RESCIF (R seau des sciences cognitives (...)
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  22. R. Murray Lindsay, Linda M. Lindsay & V. Bruce Irvine (1996). Instilling Ethical Behavior in Organizations: A Survey of Canadian Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 15 (4):393 - 407.score: 30.0
    An organization's management control system can play an important role in influencing ethical behavior among employees. In this paper a theoretical framework of control is developed by linking various ethics related control mechanisms reported in the literature to the primary components of a management control system. In addition, the findings of a survey of the Financial Post's Top 1 000 Canadian industrial and service companies are reported. The survey investigated organizations' use of ethical codes of conduct, whistleblowing systems, ethics committees, (...)
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  23. R. B. Lindsay (1937). A Critique of Operationalism in Physics. Philosophy of Science 4 (4):456-470.score: 30.0
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  24. James Lindsay (1910). The Philosophy of Schelling. Philosophical Review 19 (3):259-275.score: 30.0
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  25. Max Kistler (2009). Naturphilosophie AlS metaphysik der natur – by Michael Esfeld. Dialectica 63 (1):99-103.score: 30.0
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  26. Max Kistler (2012). Powerful Properties and the Causal Basis of Dispositions. In Alexander Bird, B. D. Ellis & Howard Sankey (eds.), Properties, Powers, and Structures: Issues in the Metaphysics of Realism. Routledge. 119--137.score: 30.0
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  27. Max Kistler (2013). The Interventionist Account of Causation and Non-Causal Association Laws. Erkenntnis 78 (1):1-20.score: 30.0
    The key idea of the interventionist account of causation is that a variable A causes a variable B if and only if B would change if A were manipulated in the appropriate way. This paper raises two problems for Woodward's (2003) version of interventionism. The first is that the conditions it imposes are not sufficient for causation, because these conditions are also satisfied by non-causal relations of nomological dependence expressed in association laws. Such laws ground a relation of mutual manipulability (...)
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  28. Ronald A. Lindsay (2005). Enhancements and Justice: Problems in Determining the Requirements of Justice in a Genetically Transformed Society. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (1):3-38.score: 30.0
    : There is a concern that genetic engineering will exacerbate existing social divisions and inequalities, especially if only the wealthy can afford genetic enhancements. Accordingly, many argue that justice requires the imposition of constraints on genetic engineering. However, it would be unwise to decide at this time what limits should be imposed in the future. Decision makers currently lack both the theoretical tools and the factual foundation for making sound judgments about the requirements of justice in a genetically transformed society. (...)
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  29. M. Kistler (2010). Nature's Metaphysics -- Laws and Properties , by Alexander Bird. Mind 119 (473):188-193.score: 30.0
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  30. Kenneth C. Lindsay & Bernard Huppé (1956). Meaning and Method in Brueghel's Painting. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 14 (3):376-386.score: 30.0
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  31. A. D. Lindsay (1926). A Grammar of Politics. By H. J. Laski. (672 Pp. Allen and Unwin.). Philosophy 1 (02):246-.score: 30.0
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  32. Max Kistler (2006). Reduction and Emergence in the Physical Sciences: Reply to Rueger. Synthese 151 (3):347 - 354.score: 30.0
    I analyse Rueger’s application of Kim’s model of functional reduction to the relation between the thermal conductivities of metal bars at macroscopic and atomic scales. 1) I show that it is a misunderstanding to accuse the functional reduction model of not accounting for the fact that there are causal powers at the micro-level which have no equivalent at the macro-level. The model not only allows but requires that the causal powers by virtue of which a functional predicate is defined, are (...)
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  33. James Lindsay (1906). Plato and Aristotle on the Problem of Efficient Causation. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 19 (4):509-514.score: 30.0
  34. J. N. Mattock (1987). C. E. Butterworth: Averroes' Middle Commentary on Aristotle's Poetics (Translated, with Introduction and Notes). Pp. Xvi+161. Princeton University Press, 1986. £15.10. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 37 (02):332-333.score: 30.0
  35. A. D. Lindsay (1933). The Good Will: A Study in the Coherence Theory of Goodness. By H. J. Paton. (London: George Allen & Unwin Ltd. New York: The Macmillan Co. 1927. Pp. 448. Price 16s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 8 (32):472-.score: 30.0
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  36. Max Kistler (2007). Review of Markus Schrenk, The Metaphysics of Ceteris Paribus Laws. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (10).score: 30.0
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  37. J. N. Mattock (1971). F. E. Peters: Aristoteles Arabus: The Oriental Translations and Commentaries on the Aristotelian Corpus. Pp. Viii+75. Leiden: Brill, 1968. Cloth, Fl.32. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 21 (01):129-.score: 30.0
  38. Max Kistler (1999). Causes as Events and Facts. Dialectica 53 (1):25–46.score: 30.0
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  39. Max Kistler (2010). Review of Alexander Hieke, Hannes Leitgeb (Eds.), Reduction: Between the Mind and the Brain. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (2).score: 30.0
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  40. Max Kistler (2004). Some Problems for Lowe's Four-Category Ontology. Analysis 64 (2):146–151.score: 30.0
    In E.J. Lowe's ontology, (individual) objects are property-bearers which 1) have identity and 2) are countable. This makes it possible to become or cease to be an object, by beginning or ceasing to fulfil one of these conditions. But the possibility of switching fundamental ontological categories should be excluded. Furthermore, Lowe does not show that “quasi-individuals” (which are not countable) can exist. I argue against Lowe that kinds cannot be property-bearers in a more genuine sense than properties, that they are (...)
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  41. Edward Andrew & Peter Lindsay (2008). Are the Judgments of Conscience Unreasonable? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 11 (2):235-254.score: 30.0
    This paper examines the tensions in classical liberal theory ? particularly that of Locke and Kant ? between reason and conscience, and in contemporary liberal theory between the demands of reasonableness and the dictates of conscience. We intend to show that the relationship between reasonableness and conscience is both unstable and necessary; on occasions there seems to exist a moral obligation to provide public reasons for our conduct and at other times the silent call of conscience precludes public justification of (...)
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  42. Max Kistler & Bruno Gnassounou (eds.) (2007). Dispositions and Causal Powers. Ashgate.score: 30.0
    This collection of essays, by leading international researchers, examines the case for realism with respect to dispositions and causal powers in both ...
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  43. Max Kistler (2002). The Causal Criterion of Reality and the Necessity of Laws of Nature. Metaphysica 3 (1):57-86.score: 30.0
  44. Ronald A. Lindsay (2009). Bioethics Policies and the Compass of Common Morality. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (1):31-43.score: 30.0
    Even if there is a common morality, many would argue that it provides little guidance in resolving moral disputes, because universally accepted norms are both general in content and few in number. However, if we supplement common morality with commonly accepted factual beliefs and culture-specific norms and utilize coherentist reasoning, we can limit the range of acceptable answers to disputed issues. Moreover, in the arena of public policy, where one must take into account both legal and moral norms, the constraints (...)
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  45. James E. Lindsay (1917). The Knowledge of Other Minds. Philosophical Review 26 (5):545-547.score: 30.0
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  46. Peter Lindsay (2012). Can We Own the Past? Cultural Artifacts as Public Goods. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (1):1-17.score: 30.0
    This paper examines a concrete political controversy in order to shed light on a broad philosophical issue. The controversy is with regard to who owns cultural antiquities ? the nations (often in the developing world) on whose soil they originated, or the museums of developed nations that have, through a variety of means, come into possession of them. Despite their opposing views, both sides accept the claim that ownership can be derived from prior facts about cultural identity. Moreover, when their (...)
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  47. Chris Lindsay (forthcoming). Reid on Instinctive Exertions and the Spatial Content of Sensations. In Todd Buras & Rebecca Copenhaver (eds.), Mind, Knowledge and Action: Essays in Honor of Reid’s Tercentenary.score: 30.0
    In his last great philosophical essay, 'Of Power', Reid makes the plausible claim that 'our first exertions are instinctive' and made 'without any distinct conception of the event that is to follow'. According to Reid, these instinctive exertions allow us to form beliefs about correlations between exertions and consequential events. Such instinctive exertions also explain the origin of our conception of power. In this paper, I argue that we can use the notion of instinctive exertions to address several objections that (...)
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  48. Clarence M. Kelley & D. S. Lindsay (1996). Conscious and Unconscious Forms of Memory. In E. Bjork & R. Bjork (eds.), Memory: Handbook of Perception and Cognition. Academic Press.score: 30.0
  49. W. M. Lindsay (1906). On the Fragments of Varro de Vita Populi Romani I Preserved in Nonius XVIII. The Classical Review 20 (09):440-441.score: 30.0
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  50. Max Kistler (forthcoming). Horizontal, Vertical and Diachronic Emergence. Emergence.score: 30.0
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