Search results for 'Lindsay McShane Sara Lindeman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  5
    Sébastien Mena, Marieke de Leede, Dorothée Baumann, Nicky Black, Sara Lindeman & Lindsay McShane (2010). Advancing the Business and Human Rights Agenda: Dialogue, Empowerment, and Constructive Engagement. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1):161-188.
    As corporations are going global, they are increasingly confronted with human rights challenges. As such, new ways to deal with human rights challenges in corporate operations must be developed as traditional governance mechanisms are not always able to tackle them. This article presents five different views on innovative solutions for the relationships between business and human rights that all build on empowerment, dialogue and constructive engagement. The different approaches highlight an emerging trend toward a more active role for corporations in (...)
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  2.  18
    Lindsay McShane & Peggy Cunningham (2012). To Thine Own Self Be True? Employees' Judgments of the Authenticity of Their Organization's Corporate Social Responsibility Program. Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):81-100.
    Despite recognizing the importance of developing authentic corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs, noticeably absent from the literature is consideration for how employees distinguish between authentic and inauthentic CSR programs. This is somewhat surprising given that employees are essentially the face of their organization and are largely expected to act as ambassadors for the organization’s CSR program (Collier and Esteban in Bus Ethics 16:19–33, 2007 ). The current research, by conducting depth interviews with employees, builds a better understanding of how employees (...)
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  3.  2
    Ethan Pancer, Lindsay McShane & Theodore J. Noseworthy (forthcoming). Isolated Environmental Cues and Product Efficacy Penalties: The Color Green and Eco-Labels. Journal of Business Ethics.
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  4.  4
    Dima Amso, Sara Haas, Lauren McShane & David Badre (2014). Working Memory Updating and the Development of Rule-Guided Behavior. Cognition 133 (1):201-210.
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  5.  13
    Marieke Leede Sébastien Mendea, Nicky Black Dorothée Baumann & Lindsay McShane Sara Lindeman (2010). Advancing the Business and Human Rights Agenda: Dialogue, Empowerment, and Constructive Engagement. Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1).
    As corporations are going global, they are increasingly confronted with human rights challenges. As such, new ways to deal with human rights challenges in corporate operations must be developed as traditional governance mechanisms are not always able to tackle them. This article presents five different views on innovative solutions for the relationships between business and human rights that all build on empowerment, dialogue and constructive engagement. The different approaches highlight an emerging trend toward a more active role for corporations in (...)
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  6. Robert Bruce Lindsay & Henry Margenau (1957). Foundations of Physics [by] Robert Bruce Lindsay [and] Henry Margenau. Dover Publications.
     
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  7. Friedrich Ueberweg & Thomas Martin Lindsay (1871). System of Logic and History of Logical Doctrines. Tr., with Notes and Appendices, by T.M. Lindsay.
     
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  8.  4
    Philip McShane (2013). 'What-To-Do?': The Heart of Lonergan's Ethics. Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis 7:69-93.
    Philip McShane explores the implications of Bernard Lonergan’s compacted account of ‘what questions’ and ‘what-to-do questions’ for understanding deliberation. The essay provides a fascinating and instructive glimpse into McShane’s own long-continued struggle and dialogue with Lonergan’s achievement.
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  9.  3
    W. M. Lindsay (1928). Aquilo, the Black Wind. The Classical Review 42 (01):20-.
    Professor Lindsay [Class. Rev. XLII. , p. 20] has drawn attention to a Celtic paralle to Aquilo, the Black Wind . A less remote parallel was found by Salmasius [Plin. Exerc. in Solinum , p. 1258D] in the gloss melatnboros uulturnus, on which he makes the following comment: ‘Glossae nostrae nondum editae: ‘ Septenirio, ΚЄρκίίας, Circius, Χωρupbs, Chaurus. Eaedem Glossae Volturnum Graece exponunt. An Volturnum quasi Volturinum idest nigrum dictum earum putauit auctor? Sed haec expositio conuenit Aquiloni, qui est (...)
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  10. A. D. Lindsay (2014). The Good and the Clever: The Founders' Memorial Lecture, Girton College 1945. Cambridge University Press.
    Originally published in 1945, this book presents the content of the Girton College Founders' Memorial Lecture for that year, which was delivered by A. D. Lindsay. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in philosophy and the relationship between intelligence and morality.
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  11. James Lindsay (1922). Rosmini, Bonatelli, and Varisco, on Consciousness. Philosophical Review 31 (4):400-404.
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  12.  1
    Robert Bruce Lindsay (9999/1957). Foundations of Physics. New York, Dover Publications.
  13. A. E. Taylor, John Adams, P. E. Winter, F. C. S. Schiller, M. L., S. R., J. Waterlow, Francis Jones, B. Russell, E. M. Smith & A. D. Lindsay (1910). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 19 (75):422-442.
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  14.  30
    R. Murray Lindsay, Linda M. Lindsay & V. Bruce Irvine (1996). Instilling Ethical Behavior in Organizations: A Survey of Canadian Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 15 (4):393 - 407.
    An organization's management control system can play an important role in influencing ethical behavior among employees. In this paper a theoretical framework of control is developed by linking various ethics related control mechanisms reported in the literature to the primary components of a management control system. In addition, the findings of a survey of the Financial Post's Top 1 000 Canadian industrial and service companies are reported. The survey investigated organizations' use of ethical codes of conduct, whistleblowing systems, ethics committees, (...)
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  15.  27
    Katie McShane (2007). Why Environmental Ethics Shouldn't Give Up on Intrinsic Value. Environmental Ethics 29 (1):43-61.
    Recent critics (Andrew Light, Bryan Norton, Anthony Weston, and Bruce Morito, among others) have argued that we should give up talk of intrinsic value in general and that of nature in particular. While earlier theorists might have overestimated the importance of intrinsic value, these recent critics underestimate its importance. Claims about a thing’s intrinsic value are claims about the distinctive way in which we have reason to care about that thing. If we understand intrinsic value in this manner, we can (...)
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  16.  38
    Ronald A. Lindsay (2009). Oregon's Experience: Evaluating the Record. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (3):19 – 27.
    Prior to passage of the Oregon Death with Dignity Act, opponents of assistance in dying argued that legalization would have serious harmful consequences. Specifically, they argued that the quality and availability of palliative care would decline, that the harms of legalization would affect certain vulnerable groups disproportionately, that legal assisted dying could not be confined to the competent terminally ill who voluntarily request assistance, and that the practice would result in frequent abuses. Data from Oregon's decade-long experience decisively refute the (...)
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  17.  41
    W. M. Lindsay (1914). Obituary. The Classical Review 28 (01):30-31.
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  18.  8
    James M. Lindsay (2009). The Case for a Concert of Democracies. Ethics and International Affairs 23 (1):5-11.
    Over a whole range of challenges, the world is essentially undergoverned. New institutions are needed that recognize how much the world has changed and that mobilize those states most capable of meeting the dangers we confront.
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  19.  18
    Katie McShane (2012). Some Challenges for Narrative Accounts of Value. Ethics and the Environment 17 (1):45-69.
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  20. Samuel McCune Lindsay (1902). The Modern Workman and Corporate Control. International Journal of Ethics 12 (2):204-215.
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  21.  32
    James Lindsay (1898). Critical Notices. Mind 7 (27):411-419.
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  22.  23
    Ronald A. Lindsay (2005). Enhancements and Justice: Problems in Determining the Requirements of Justice in a Genetically Transformed Society. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (1):3-38.
    : There is a concern that genetic engineering will exacerbate existing social divisions and inequalities, especially if only the wealthy can afford genetic enhancements. Accordingly, many argue that justice requires the imposition of constraints on genetic engineering. However, it would be unwise to decide at this time what limits should be imposed in the future. Decision makers currently lack both the theoretical tools and the factual foundation for making sound judgments about the requirements of justice in a genetically transformed society. (...)
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  23.  5
    Chris Lindsay (2012). Hume and Reid on Newtonianism, Naturalism and Liberty. In Ilya Kasavin (ed.), David Hume and Contemporary Philosophy. Cambridge Scholars Press
    There has been a recent flurry of work comparing and contrasting the respective methodologies of David Hume and his contemporary Thomas Reid. Both writers are explicit in their commitments to a Newtonian methodology. Yet they diverge radically on the issue of human liberty. In this paper I want to unpack the methodological commitments underlying the two different accounts of liberty. How is it that two avowed Newtonians end up diametrically opposed to one another with respect to such a fundamental aspect (...)
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  24.  53
    Anne Lindsay (1974). On the Slippery Slope Again. Analysis 35 (1):32 -.
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  25.  22
    Edward D. McShane (1966). Martin Luther. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 41 (1):104-116.
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  26.  6
    Ronald A. Lindsay (2006). Why Should We Be Concerned About Disparate Impact? American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):23 – 24.
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  27.  36
    Katie McShane (2007). Anthropocentrism Vs. Nonanthropocentrism: Why Should We Care? Environmental Values 16 (2):169-85.
    Many recent critical discussions of anthropocentrism have focused on Bryan Norton's 'convergence hypothesis': the claim that both anthropocentric and nonanthropocentric ethics will recommend the same environmentally responsible behaviours and policies. I argue that even if we grant the truth of Norton's convergence hypothesis, there are still good reasons to worry about anthropocentric ethics. Ethics legitimately raises questions about how to feel, not just about which actions to take or which policies to adopt. From the point of view of norms for (...)
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  28.  62
    Chris Lindsay (2005). Reid on Scepticism About Agency and the Self. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 3 (1):19-33.
    Maria Alvarez has argued that Thomas Reid’s account of action gives rise to a sceptical worry concerning one’s awareness of one’s own actions. Against this, I argue that Alvarez overstates the sceptical consequences of Reid’s admission that there is room for doubt about the actual causes of bodily movements; rather than generating a serious epistemological problem for his theory, it can be given a more plausible reading that serves to defuse the sceptical worry.
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  29.  21
    Edward D. McShane (1959). The Middle Ages. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 34 (3):358-382.
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  30.  1
    Ronald A. Lindsay (2002). Should We Impose Quotas? Evaluating the "Disparate Impact" Argument Against Legalization of Assisted Suicide. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 30 (1):6-16.
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  31.  73
    R. B. Lindsay (1937). The Meaning of Simplicity in Physics. Philosophy of Science 4 (2):151-167.
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  32.  17
    Philip McShane (1963). The Foundations of Mathematics. Modern Schoolman 40 (4):373-387.
  33. Katie McShane (2009). Environmental Ethics: An Overview. Philosophy Compass 4 (3):407-420.
    This essay provides an overview of the field of environmental ethics. I sketch the major debates in the field from its inception in the 1970s to today, explaining both the central tenets of the schools of thought within the field and the arguments that have been given for and against them. I describe the main trends within the field as a whole and review some of the criticisms that have been offered of prevailing views.
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  34. Ronald A. Lindsay (2008). Future Bioethics: Overcoming Taboos, Myths, and Dogmas. Prometheus Books.
     
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  35.  15
    James Lindsay (1922). The Realism of Tongiorgi. The Monist 32 (3):466-470.
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  36.  7
    Ronald Alan Lindsay (2005). Enhancements and Justice: Problems in Determining the Requirements of Justice in a Genetically Transformed Society. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (1):3-38.
  37.  14
    James Lindsay (1918). Rationalism and Voluntarism. The Monist 28 (3):433-455.
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  38.  31
    Katie Mcshane, Allen Thompson & Ronald Sandler (2008). Virtue and Respect for Nature: Ronald Sandler's Character and Environment. Ethics, Place and Environment 11 (2):213 – 235.
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  39.  13
    Philip McShane (2011). Implementing Lonergan's Economics. The Lonergan Review 3 (1):196-204.
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  40.  30
    Ronald A. Lindsay (2005). Slaves, Embryos, and Nonhuman Animals: Moral Status and the Limitations of Common Morality Theory. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (4):323-346.
    : Common morality theory must confront apparent counterexamples from the history of morality, such as the widespread acceptance of slavery in prior eras, that suggest core norms have changed over time. A recent defense of common morality theory addresses this problem by drawing a distinction between the content of the norms of the common morality and the range of individuals to whom these norms apply. This distinction is successful in reconciling common morality theory with practices such as slavery, but only (...)
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  41.  8
    Wallace M. Lindsay (1888). The Early Italian Declension. The Classical Review 2 (09):273-277.
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  42.  10
    James Lindsay (1922). The Realism of Tongiorgi. The Monist 32 (3):466-470.
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  43.  10
    James Lindsay (1919). The Greatest Problem in Value. The Monist 29 (1):64-95.
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  44.  40
    Katie McShane (2011). Neosentimentalism and Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 33 (1):5-23.
    Neosentimentalism provides environmental ethics with a theory of value that might be particularly useful for solving many of the problems that have plagued the field since its early days. In particular, a neosentimentalist understanding of value offers us hope for making sense of (1) what intrinsic value might be and how we could know whether parts of the natural world have it; (2) the extent to which value is an essentially anthropocentric concept; and (3) how our understanding of value could (...)
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  45.  37
    Katie McShane (2013). Neosentimentalism and the Valence of Attitudes. Philosophical Studies 164 (3):747-765.
    Neosentimentalist accounts of value need an explanation of which of the sentiments they discuss are pro-attitudes, which attitudes are con-attitudes, and why. I argue that this project has long been neglected in the philosophical literature, even by those who make extensive use of the distinction between pro- and con-attitudes. Using the attitudes of awe and respect as exemplars, I argue that it is not at all clear what if anything makes these attitudes pro-attitudes. I conclude that neither our intuitive sense (...)
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  46. Larry L. Jacoby, J. P. Toth, D. S. Lindsay & J. A. Debner (1992). Lectures for a Layperson: Methods for Revealing Unconscious Processes. In Robert F. Bornstein & B. Pittman (eds.), Perception Without Awareness: Cognitive, Clinical, and Social Perspectives. Guilford Press
     
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  47.  5
    Ronald A. Lindsay (2007). When to Grant Conscientious Objector Status. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):25 – 26.
  48.  11
    Katie McShane (2004). Ecosystem Health. Environmental Ethics 26 (3):227-245.
    On most understandings of what an ecosystem is, it is a kind of thing that can be literally, not just metaphorically, healthy or unhealthy. Health is best understood as a kind of well-being; a thing’s health is a matter of retaining those structures and functions that are good for it. While it is true both that what’s good for an ecosystem depends on how we define the system and that how we define the system depends on our interests, these facts (...)
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  49.  10
    Katie McShane (2004). Ecosystem Health. Environmental Ethics 26 (3):227-245.
    On most understandings of what an ecosystem is, it is a kind of thing that can be literally, not just metaphorically, healthy or unhealthy. Health is best understood as a kind of well-being; a thing’s health is a matter of retaining those structures and functions that are good for it. While it is true both that what’s good for an ecosystem depends on how we define the system and that how we define the system depends on our interests, these facts (...)
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  50.  2
    Ronald Lindsay (2006). Role-Differentiated Morality: The Need to Consider Institutions, Not Just Individuals. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):70-72.
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