Search results for 'Lindsay McShane Sara Lindeman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sébastien Mena, Marieke de Leede, Dorothée Baumann, Nicky Black, Sara Lindeman & Lindsay McShane (2010). Advancing the Business and Human Rights Agenda: Dialogue, Empowerment, and Constructive Engagement. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1):161-188.score: 19200.0
    As corporations are going global, they are increasingly confronted with human rights challenges. As such, new ways to deal with human rights challenges in corporate operations must be developed as traditional governance mechanisms are not always able to tackle them. This article presents five different views on innovative solutions for the relationships between business and human rights that all build on empowerment, dialogue and constructive engagement. The different approaches highlight an emerging trend toward a more active role for corporations in (...)
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  2. Lindsay McShane & Peggy Cunningham (2012). To Thine Own Self Be True? Employees' Judgments of the Authenticity of Their Organization's Corporate Social Responsibility Program. Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):81-100.score: 240.0
    Despite recognizing the importance of developing authentic corporate social responsibility (CSR) programs, noticeably absent from the literature is consideration for how employees distinguish between authentic and inauthentic CSR programs. This is somewhat surprising given that employees are essentially the face of their organization and are largely expected to act as ambassadors for the organization’s CSR program (Collier and Esteban in Bus Ethics 16:19–33, 2007 ). The current research, by conducting depth interviews with employees, builds a better understanding of how employees (...)
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  3. Dima Amso, Sara Haas, Lauren McShane & David Badre (2014). Working Memory Updating and the Development of Rule-Guided Behavior. Cognition 133 (1):201-210.score: 240.0
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  4. Marieke Leede Sébastien Mendea, Nicky Black Dorothée Baumann & Lindsay McShane Sara Lindeman (2010). Advancing the Business and Human Rights Agenda: Dialogue, Empowerment, and Constructive Engagement. Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1).score: 198.0
    As corporations are going global, they are increasingly confronted with human rights challenges. As such, new ways to deal with human rights challenges in corporate operations must be developed as traditional governance mechanisms are not always able to tackle them. This article presents five different views on innovative solutions for the relationships between business and human rights that all build on empowerment, dialogue and constructive engagement. The different approaches highlight an emerging trend toward a more active role for corporations in (...)
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  5. Philip McShane (2013). 'What-To-Do?': The Heart of Lonergan's Ethics. Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis 7.score: 60.0
    Philip McShane explores the implications of Bernard Lonergan’s compacted account of ‘what questions’ and ‘what-to-do questions’ for understanding deliberation. The essay provides a fascinating and instructive glimpse into McShane’s own long-continued struggle and dialogue with Lonergan’s achievement.
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  6. Katie McShane (2009). Environmental Ethics: An Overview. Philosophy Compass 4 (3):407-420.score: 30.0
    This essay provides an overview of the field of environmental ethics. I sketch the major debates in the field from its inception in the 1970s to today, explaining both the central tenets of the schools of thought within the field and the arguments that have been given for and against them. I describe the main trends within the field as a whole and review some of the criticisms that have been offered of prevailing views.
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  7. Chris Lindsay (2005). Reid on Scepticism About Agency and the Self. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 3 (1):19-33.score: 30.0
    Maria Alvarez has argued that Thomas Reid’s account of action gives rise to a sceptical worry concerning one’s awareness of one’s own actions. Against this, I argue that Alvarez overstates the sceptical consequences of Reid’s admission that there is room for doubt about the actual causes of bodily movements; rather than generating a serious epistemological problem for his theory, it can be given a more plausible reading that serves to defuse the sceptical worry.
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  8. Katie McShane (2011). Neosentimentalism and Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 33 (1):5-23.score: 30.0
    Neosentimentalism provides environmental ethics with a theory of value that might be particularly useful for solving many of the problems that have plagued the field since its early days. In particular, a neosentimentalist understanding of value offers us hope for making sense of (1) what intrinsic value might be and how we could know whether parts of the natural world have it; (2) the extent to which value is an essentially anthropocentric concept; and (3) how our understanding of value could (...)
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  9. Katie McShane (2013). Neosentimentalism and the Valence of Attitudes. Philosophical Studies 164 (3):747-765.score: 30.0
    Neosentimentalist accounts of value need an explanation of which of the sentiments they discuss are pro-attitudes, which attitudes are con-attitudes, and why. I argue that this project has long been neglected in the philosophical literature, even by those who make extensive use of the distinction between pro- and con-attitudes. Using the attitudes of awe and respect as exemplars, I argue that it is not at all clear what if anything makes these attitudes pro-attitudes. I conclude that neither our intuitive sense (...)
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  10. Ronald A. Lindsay (2009). Oregon's Experience: Evaluating the Record. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (3):19 – 27.score: 30.0
    Prior to passage of the Oregon Death with Dignity Act, opponents of assistance in dying argued that legalization would have serious harmful consequences. Specifically, they argued that the quality and availability of palliative care would decline, that the harms of legalization would affect certain vulnerable groups disproportionately, that legal assisted dying could not be confined to the competent terminally ill who voluntarily request assistance, and that the practice would result in frequent abuses. Data from Oregon's decade-long experience decisively refute the (...)
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  11. Peter Lindsay (2002). The 'Disembodied Self' in Political Theory: The Communitarians, Macpherson and Marx. Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (2):191-211.score: 30.0
    The communitarian critique of liberal agency is reminiscent of two earlier critiques: C. B. Macpherson's theory of possessive individualism and Marx's theory of alienation. As with the communitarian critique, Macpherson and Marx saw the liberal individual as being in some way 'disembodied'. Where they differed from communitarians was in the attention they paid to the actual social relations that gave rise to such an image. The comparison is thus fruitful because the emphasis Macpherson and Marx give to the concrete circumstances (...)
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  12. Ronald A. Lindsay (2005). Slaves, Embryos, and Nonhuman Animals: Moral Status and the Limitations of Common Morality Theory. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (4):323-346.score: 30.0
    : Common morality theory must confront apparent counterexamples from the history of morality, such as the widespread acceptance of slavery in prior eras, that suggest core norms have changed over time. A recent defense of common morality theory addresses this problem by drawing a distinction between the content of the norms of the common morality and the range of individuals to whom these norms apply. This distinction is successful in reconciling common morality theory with practices such as slavery, but only (...)
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  13. Katie Mcshane, Allen Thompson & Ronald Sandler (2008). Virtue and Respect for Nature: Ronald Sandler's Character and Environment. Ethics, Place and Environment 11 (2):213 – 235.score: 30.0
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  14. R. Murray Lindsay, Linda M. Lindsay & V. Bruce Irvine (1996). Instilling Ethical Behavior in Organizations: A Survey of Canadian Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 15 (4):393 - 407.score: 30.0
    An organization's management control system can play an important role in influencing ethical behavior among employees. In this paper a theoretical framework of control is developed by linking various ethics related control mechanisms reported in the literature to the primary components of a management control system. In addition, the findings of a survey of the Financial Post's Top 1 000 Canadian industrial and service companies are reported. The survey investigated organizations' use of ethical codes of conduct, whistleblowing systems, ethics committees, (...)
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  15. R. B. Lindsay (1937). A Critique of Operationalism in Physics. Philosophy of Science 4 (4):456-470.score: 30.0
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  16. James Lindsay (1910). The Philosophy of Schelling. Philosophical Review 19 (3):259-275.score: 30.0
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  17. Ronald A. Lindsay (2005). Enhancements and Justice: Problems in Determining the Requirements of Justice in a Genetically Transformed Society. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (1):3-38.score: 30.0
    : There is a concern that genetic engineering will exacerbate existing social divisions and inequalities, especially if only the wealthy can afford genetic enhancements. Accordingly, many argue that justice requires the imposition of constraints on genetic engineering. However, it would be unwise to decide at this time what limits should be imposed in the future. Decision makers currently lack both the theoretical tools and the factual foundation for making sound judgments about the requirements of justice in a genetically transformed society. (...)
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  18. Kenneth C. Lindsay & Bernard Huppé (1956). Meaning and Method in Brueghel's Painting. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 14 (3):376-386.score: 30.0
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  19. A. D. Lindsay (1926). A Grammar of Politics. By H. J. Laski. (672 Pp. Allen and Unwin.). Philosophy 1 (02):246-.score: 30.0
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  20. Katie McShane (2012). Some Challenges for Narrative Accounts of Value. Ethics and the Environment 17 (1):45-69.score: 30.0
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  21. Katie McShane (2003). Review of Kristin Shrader-Frechette, Environmental Justice: Creating Equality, Reclaiming Democracy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (9).score: 30.0
  22. James Lindsay (1906). Plato and Aristotle on the Problem of Efficient Causation. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 19 (4):509-514.score: 30.0
  23. A. D. Lindsay (1933). The Good Will: A Study in the Coherence Theory of Goodness. By H. J. Paton. (London: George Allen & Unwin Ltd. New York: The Macmillan Co. 1927. Pp. 448. Price 16s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 8 (32):472-.score: 30.0
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  24. Katie McShane (2007). Why Environmental Ethics Shouldn't Give Up on Intrinsic Value. Environmental Ethics 29 (1):43-61.score: 30.0
    Recent critics (Andrew Light, Bryan Norton, Anthony Weston, and Bruce Morito, among others) have argued that we should give up talk of intrinsic value in general and that of nature in particular. While earlier theorists might have overestimated the importance of intrinsic value, these recent critics underestimate its importance. Claims about a thing’s intrinsic value are claims about the distinctive way in which we have reason to care about that thing. If we understand intrinsic value in this manner, we can (...)
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  25. Ronald A. Lindsay (2009). Bioethics Policies and the Compass of Common Morality. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (1):31-43.score: 30.0
    Even if there is a common morality, many would argue that it provides little guidance in resolving moral disputes, because universally accepted norms are both general in content and few in number. However, if we supplement common morality with commonly accepted factual beliefs and culture-specific norms and utilize coherentist reasoning, we can limit the range of acceptable answers to disputed issues. Moreover, in the arena of public policy, where one must take into account both legal and moral norms, the constraints (...)
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  26. Edward Andrew & Peter Lindsay (2008). Are the Judgments of Conscience Unreasonable? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 11 (2):235-254.score: 30.0
    This paper examines the tensions in classical liberal theory ? particularly that of Locke and Kant ? between reason and conscience, and in contemporary liberal theory between the demands of reasonableness and the dictates of conscience. We intend to show that the relationship between reasonableness and conscience is both unstable and necessary; on occasions there seems to exist a moral obligation to provide public reasons for our conduct and at other times the silent call of conscience precludes public justification of (...)
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  27. Peter Lindsay (2012). Can We Own the Past? Cultural Artifacts as Public Goods. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (1):1-17.score: 30.0
    This paper examines a concrete political controversy in order to shed light on a broad philosophical issue. The controversy is with regard to who owns cultural antiquities ? the nations (often in the developing world) on whose soil they originated, or the museums of developed nations that have, through a variety of means, come into possession of them. Despite their opposing views, both sides accept the claim that ownership can be derived from prior facts about cultural identity. Moreover, when their (...)
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  28. James E. Lindsay (1917). The Knowledge of Other Minds. Philosophical Review 26 (5):545-547.score: 30.0
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  29. Katie McShane (2007). Anthropocentrism Vs. Nonanthropocentrism: Why Should We Care? Environmental Values 16 (2):169-85.score: 30.0
    Many recent critical discussions of anthropocentrism have focused on Bryan Norton's 'convergence hypothesis': the claim that both anthropocentric and nonanthropocentric ethics will recommend the same environmentally responsible behaviours and policies. I argue that even if we grant the truth of Norton's convergence hypothesis, there are still good reasons to worry about anthropocentric ethics. Ethics legitimately raises questions about how to feel, not just about which actions to take or which policies to adopt. From the point of view of norms for (...)
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  30. Helen A. Fletcher, Tony Hawkridge & Helen McShane (2009). A New Vaccine for Tuberculosis: The Challenges of Development and Deployment. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (2):219-228.score: 30.0
    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the world’s leading causes of death due to infection and efforts to control TB would be substantially aided by the availability of an improved TB vaccine. There are currently nine new TB vaccines in clinical development, and the first efficacy trials are due to commence in 2009. There are many complex ethical issues which arise at all stages of TB vaccine development, from the need to conduct trials in developing countries to informed consent and the (...)
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  31. Clarence M. Kelley & D. S. Lindsay (1996). Conscious and Unconscious Forms of Memory. In E. Bjork & R. Bjork (eds.), Memory: Handbook of Perception and Cognition. Academic Press.score: 30.0
  32. W. M. Lindsay (1906). On the Fragments of Varro de Vita Populi Romani I Preserved in Nonius XVIII. The Classical Review 20 (09):440-441.score: 30.0
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  33. Chris Lindsay (forthcoming). Reid on Instinctive Exertions and the Spatial Content of Sensations. In Todd Buras & Rebecca Copenhaver (eds.), Mind, Knowledge and Action: Essays in Honor of Reid’s Tercentenary.score: 30.0
    In his last great philosophical essay, 'Of Power', Reid makes the plausible claim that 'our first exertions are instinctive' and made 'without any distinct conception of the event that is to follow'. According to Reid, these instinctive exertions allow us to form beliefs about correlations between exertions and consequential events. Such instinctive exertions also explain the origin of our conception of power. In this paper, I argue that we can use the notion of instinctive exertions to address several objections that (...)
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  34. Peter Lindsay (1996). Creative Individualism: The Democratic Vision of C.B. Macpherson. State University of New York Press.score: 30.0
    The result is a vision of creative individualism for the post-communist world that combines Macpherson's insistence on social justice with the lessons learned ...
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  35. James M. Lindsay (2009). The Case for a Concert of Democracies. Ethics and International Affairs 23 (1):5-11.score: 30.0
  36. James Lindsay (1903). The Ethical Philosophy of Marcus Aurelius. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 16 (2):252-258.score: 30.0
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  37. James Lindsay (1905). XVIII. Some Criticisms on Spinoza's Ethics. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 18 (4):496-506.score: 30.0
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  38. Hugh Lindsay (2008). (T.G.) Parkin (A.J.) Pomeroy Roman Social History. A Sourcebook. Pp. Xviii + 388, Maps. Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2007. Paper, £20.99 (Cased, £70). ISBN: 978-0-415-42675-6 (978-0-415-42674-9 Hbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 58 (02):621-.score: 30.0
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  39. A. D. Lindsay (1911/1968). The Philosophy of Bergson. Port Washington, N.Y.,Kennikat Press.score: 30.0
    THE PHILOSOPHY OF BERGSON CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION In a passage of the Critique of Pure Reason Kant remarks that " It is a great and essential proof of ...
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  40. A. D. Lindsay (1932). The Republic in the Loeb Library Plato: The Republic. With an English Translation by Paul Shorey, Ph.D., LL.D., Litt.D. Books I-V. (Loeb Classical Library.) London: Heinemann, 1930. Cloth, 10s.; Leather, 12s. 6d. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 46 (01):14-15.score: 30.0
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  41. Roger Lindsay (1996). Cognitive Technology and the Pragmatics of Impossible Plans — A Study in Cognitive Prosthetics. AI and Society 10 (3-4):273-288.score: 30.0
    Do AI programs just make it quicker and easier for humans to do what they can do already, or can the range of do-able things be extended? This paper suggests that cognitively-oriented technology can make it possible for humans to construct and carry out mental operations, which were previously impossible. Probable constraints upon possible human mental operations are identified and the impact of cognitive technology upon them is evaluated. It is argued that information technology functions as a cognitive prosthetic enhancing (...)
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  42. G. F. Stout, H. Wildon Carr, Shadworth H. Hodgson, Henry Sturt & James Lindsay (1901). Alleged Self-Contradictions in the Concept of Relation: A Criticism of Mr. Bradley's "Appearance and Reality," Pt. I, Ch. III [with Discussion]. [REVIEW] Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 2:1 - 24.score: 30.0
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  43. A. D. Lindsay (1906). Book Review:Sokrates und Die Ethik. Hermann Nohl. [REVIEW] Ethics 16 (4):500-.score: 30.0
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  44. J. P. Miller, J. Tartaglia & C. Lindsay (2005). General Philosophy. Philosophical Books 46 (1):77-83.score: 30.0
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  45. W. M. Lindsay (1922). Apicius' Cookery-Book Apicius 'de re coquinaria.' Ediderunt C. Giarratano et Fr. Vollmer. Pp. 96. Leipzig: Teubner, 1922. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 36 (5-6):131-132.score: 30.0
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  46. T. M. Lindsay (1876). Hermann Lotze. Mind 1 (3):363-382.score: 30.0
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  47. A. D. Lindsay (1905). Moral Causation and Artistic Production. International Journal of Ethics 15 (4):399-417.score: 30.0
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  48. W. M. Lindsay (1909). Traube's Nomina Sacra and Posthumous Works Nomina Sacra : Versuch einer Geschichte der christlichen Kürzung. Von Ludwig Traube, o. ö. Professor der Philologie an der Universitat, München. (Quellen und Untersuckungen zur lateinischen Philologie des Mittelalters. Herausgegeben von Ludwig Traube. Zweiter Band). Munich: C. H. Beck'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung. 1907. Pp. x + 295. M. 15. Vorlesungen und Abhandlungen. Von Ludwig Traube. Herausgegeben von Franz Boll. Erster Band. Zur Paläographie und Handschriftenkunde. Herausgegeben von Paul Lehmann. Mit biographischer Einleitung von Franz Boll. Munich: C. H. Beck'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung. 1909. Pp. lxxv+263. [REVIEW] Classical Quarterly 3 (02):132-.score: 30.0
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  49. Katie McShane (2004). Ecosystem Health. Environmental Ethics 26 (3):227-245.score: 30.0
    On most understandings of what an ecosystem is, it is a kind of thing that can be literally, not just metaphorically, healthy or unhealthy. Health is best understood as a kind of well-being; a thing’s health is a matter of retaining those structures and functions that are good for it. While it is true both that what’s good for an ecosystem depends on how we define the system and that how we define the system depends on our interests, these facts (...)
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  50. Ronald Alan Lindsay (2005). Enhancements and Justice: Problems in Determining the Requirements of Justice in a Genetically Transformed Society. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (1):3-38.score: 30.0
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