Search results for 'Linguistics Research' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jane Grimshaw, Linguistics Research Center.score: 90.0
    Optimality Theory is a theory of the economy of constraint violation. Can this property of the theory be exploited in our understanding of economy effects in general? Can economy of structure and movement be derived without reference to economy of structure and movement? The central idea of this paper is that the choice between filling positions by movement and filling positions with independent material is determined by markedness and faithfulness constraints. There is no ‘economy of movement’ constraint, just economy of (...)
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  2. Edward Gibson & Evelina Fedorenko (2010). Weak Quantitative Standards in Linguistics Research. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (6):233-234.score: 90.0
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  3. Igor A. Bolshakov & Sofia N. Galicia-Haro (2006). Computational Linguistics Research-Corpus-Based Knowledge Acquisition-Web-Based Measurements of Intra-Collocational Cohesion in Oxford Collocations Dictionary. In O. Stock & M. Schaerf (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer-Verlag. 3878--93.score: 90.0
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  4. Jeannette Schaeffer (2000). Aphasia Research and Theoretical Linguistics Guiding Each Other. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):50-51.score: 84.0
    An elaboration on some loose ends in Grodzinsky's analysis shows that data from the field of aphasia contribute to the formulation of theoretical linguistic principles, and provides extra arguments in favor of Grodzinsky's claim that linguistic theory is the best tool for the investigation of aphasia. This illustrates and emphasizes the importance of communication between researchers in the field of (Broca's) aphasia and of theoretical linguistics.
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  5. Ayọ Bamgboṣe (1973). Linguistics in a Developing Country: An Inaugural Lecture Delivered at the University of Ibadan on 27 October 1972. University of Ibadan.score: 78.0
     
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  6. Eli Dresner, Gerd Fritz, Alan Gross & Galia Hatav (2000). Tics, Discourse Processes, Metaphor and Symbol, The Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Language and Speech, and the Journal of Psycho-Linguistic Research. Daniel Dor (Ph. D. Stanford University) Teaches Linguistics and Communica-Tion at the Departments of Communication and of English, Tel Aviv Univer. [REVIEW] Pragmatics and Cognition 8 (2):455-456.score: 78.0
     
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  7. Frederic B. Fitch, J. B. Rosser, A. R. Turquette, R. M. Martin, Nelson Goodman, Soren Hallden & Paul Bernays (2013). The Journal of Symbolic Logic Publishes Original Scholarly Work in Symbolic Logic. Founded in 1936, It has Become the Leading Research Journal in the Field. The Journal Aims to Represent Logic Broadly, Including its Connections with Mathematics and Philosophy as Well as Newer Aspects Related to Computer Science and Linguistics. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 106 (107).score: 72.0
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  8. Laszlo Kalmar, Janos Suranyi, W. V. Quine, Ernest Nagel, George Dw Berry, George W. Brown, Th Skolem, Evert W. Beth, Max Black & H. E. Vaughan (2013). The Journal of Symbolic Logic Publishes Original Scholarly Work in Symbolic Logic. Founded in 1936, It has Become the Leading Research Journal in the Field. The Journal Aims to Represent Logic Broadly, Including its Connections with Mathematics and Philosophy as Well as Newer Aspects Related to Computer Science and Linguistics. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 102 (104).score: 72.0
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  9. Timothy Smiley, Frederic B. Fitch, Shih-Chao Liu, S. C. Kleene, Keith Lehrer, Thomas E. Patton, Maria Kokoszynska, Arto Salomaa, Abraham Robinson & Gerald E. Sacks (2013). The Journal of Symbolic Logic Publishes Original Scholarly Work in Symbolic Logic. Founded in 1936, It has Become the Leading Research Journal in the Field. The Journal Aims to Represent Logic Broadly, Including its Connections with Mathematics and Philosophy as Well as Newer Aspects Related to Computer Science and Linguistics. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 175 (176).score: 72.0
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  10. Victor Harnik, Terrence S. Millar, Michael L. Wage, Saharon Shelah, Helmut Schwichtenberg, Daniel Lascar, Bruno Poizat, Warren D. Goldfarb, On Carnap & Hugues Leblanc (2013). The Journal of Symbolic Logic Publishes Original Scholarly Work in Symbolic Logic. Founded in 1936, It has Become the Leading Research Journal in the Field. The Journal Aims to Represent Logic Broadly, Including its Connections with Mathematics and Philosophy as Well as Newer Aspects Related to Computer Science and Linguistics. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 309 (318).score: 72.0
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  11. Leopold Lowenheim, S. C. Kleene, Paul Bernays, Saunders MacLane, Ernest Nagel, Albert Wohlstetter, J. C. C. McKinsey, Charles A. Baylis, Carl G. Hempel & C. H. Langford (2013). The Journal of Symbolic Logic Publishes Original Scholarly Work in Symbolic Logic. Founded in 1936, It has Become the Leading Research Journal in the Field. The Journal Aims to Represent Logic Broadly, Including its Connections with Mathematics and Philosophy as Well as Newer Aspects Related to Computer Science and Linguistics. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 43 (44).score: 72.0
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  12. Andrzej Mostowski, W. V. Quine, Arthur Francis Smullyan, Virgil Hinshaw, Alonzo Church, Charles A. Baylis, Maurice L'Abbe, Max Black, Paul Bernays & David Nelson (2013). The Journal of Symbolic Logic Publishes Original Scholarly Work in Symbolic Logic. Founded in 1936, It has Become the Leading Research Journal in the Field. The Journal Aims to Represent Logic Broadly, Including its Connections with Mathematics and Philosophy as Well as Newer Aspects Related to Computer Science and Linguistics. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 63 (64).score: 72.0
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  13. Egon Weigl & Manfred Bierwisch (forthcoming). Neuropsychology and Linguistics: Topics of Common Research. Foundations of Language.score: 72.0
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  14. Vaman Mahadeo Kulkarni & S. Y. Wakankar (eds.) (2006). Vāmanavikrama: Research in Indological Studies: Prof. V.M. Kulkarni Felicitation Volume ; Vedic Literature, Classical Sanskrit Literature, Poetics, Grammar and Linguistics, Philosophy, and Religion, Prakrit and Jainism. [REVIEW] Bharatiya Kala Prakashan.score: 72.0
     
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  15. Hayley G. Davis (2003). Rethinking Linguistics. Routledgecurzon.score: 54.0
    This book deals with the need to rethink the aims and methods of contemporary linguistics. Orthodox linguists' discussions of linguistic form fail to exemplify how language users become language makers. Integrationist theory is used here as a solution to this basic problem within general linguistics. The book is aimed at an interdisciplinary readership, comprising those engaged in study, teaching and research in the humanities and social sciences, including linguistics, philosophy, sociology and psychology.
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  16. K. P. Weinfurt, Daniel P. Sulmasy, Kevin A. Schulman & Neal J. Meropol (2003). Patient Expectations of Benefit From Phase I Clinical Trials: Linguistic Considerations in Diagnosing a Therapeutic Misconception. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (4):329-344.score: 54.0
    The ethical treatment of cancer patientsparticipating in clinical trials requiresthat patients are well-informed about thepotential benefits and risks associated withparticipation. When patients enrolled in phaseI clinical trials report that their chance ofbenefit is very high, this is often taken as evidence of a failure of the informed consent process. We argue, however, that some simple themes from the philosophy of language may make such a conclusion less certain. First, the patient may (...)
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  17. Fernando Orphão de Carvalho (2009). On a Supposed Dogma of Speech Perception Research: A Response to Appelbaum (1999). Principia 13 (1):93-103.score: 54.0
    In this paper we purport to qualify the claim, advanced by Appelbaum (1999) that speech perception research, in the last 70 years or so, has endorsed a view on the nature of speech for which no evidence can be adduced and which has resisted falsification through active ad hoc “theoretical repair” carried by speech scientists. We show that the author’s qualms on the putative dogmatic status of speech research are utterly unwarranted, if not misconstrued as a whole. On (...)
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  18. Vivien Law (2003). The History of Linguistics in Europe From Plato to 1600. Cambridge University Press.score: 54.0
    Authoritative and wide-ranging, this book examines the history of western linguistics over a 2000-year timespan, from its origins in ancient Greece up to the crucial moment of change in the Renaissance that laid the foundations of modern linguistics. Some of today's burning questions about language date back a long way: in 1400 BC Plato was asking how words relate to reality. Other questions go back just a few generations, such as our interest in the mechanisms of language change, (...)
     
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  19. Christina Behme (2013). Assessing Direct and Indirect Evidence in Linguistic Research. Topoi:1-11.score: 52.0
    This paper focuses on the linguistic evidence base provided by proponents of conceptualism (e.g., Chomsky) and rational realism (e.g., Katz) and challenges some of the arguments alleging that the evidence allowed by conceptualists is superior to that of rational realists. Three points support this challenge. First, neither conceptualists nor realists are in a position to offer direct evidence. This challenges the conceptualists’ claim that their evidence is inherently superior. Differences between the kinds of available indirect evidence will be discussed. Second, (...)
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  20. Phil Jones (2007). Constructing Meaning From Letterforms: Reflections on the Development of a Practice-Based Research Proposal. Journal of Research Practice 3 (1):Article M9.score: 48.0
    Research paradigms are only starting to emerge in relation to art and design practice. Consequently, research design in this domain often employs perspectives and methods developed in other disciplines. This paper traces the development of a proposal that combines theories from cognitive linguistics with graphic design practice. It describes the resulting challenges to and transformations of my long-held assumptions and understanding about graphic design and the communication process. It also outlines the way in which semantic analysis (a (...)
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  21. Klaas-Hinrich Ehlers (2010). Der Wille Zur Relevanz: Die Sprachforschung Und Ihre Förderung Durch Die Dfg 1920-1970. Franz Steiner Verlag.score: 48.0
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  22. Chuan Lu (2010). Xi Bao Fen Xi Yu Yan Wen Zi Xue Yan Jiu: Xu Dejiang Yu Yan Wen Zi Li Lun Ping Xi. Tong Xin Chu Ban She.score: 48.0
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  23. Lynsey Wolter (2009). Demonstratives in Philosophy and Linguistics. Philosophy Compass 4 (3):451-468.score: 42.0
    Demonstrative noun phrases (e.g., that guy , this ) are of interest to philosophers of language and semanticists because they are sensitive to demonstrations or speaker intentions. The interpretation of a demonstrative therefore sheds light on the role of the context in natural language semantics. This survey reviews two types of approaches to demonstratives: Kaplan's direct reference treatment of demonstratives and other indexicals, and recent challenges to Kaplan's approach that focus on less obviously context-sensitive uses of demonstratives. The survey then (...)
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  24. Lynsey Wolter (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Demonstratives in Philosophy and Linguistics. Philosophy Compass 5 (1):108-111.score: 42.0
    Demonstrative noun phrases (e.g. this; that guy over there ) are intimately connected to the context of use in that their reference is determined by demonstrations and/or the speaker's intentions. The semantics of demonstratives therefore has important implications not only for theories of reference, but for questions about how information from the context interacts with formal semantics. First treated by Kaplan as directly referential , demonstratives have recently been analyzed as quantifiers by King, and the choice between these two approaches (...)
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  25. William P. Bechtel (1993). Decomposing Intentionality: Perspectives on Intentionality Drawn From Language Research with Two Species of Chimpanzees. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 8 (1):1-32.score: 42.0
    In philosophy the term intentionality refers to the feature possessed by mental states of beingabout things others than themselves. A serious question has been how to explain the intentionality of mental states. This paper starts with linguistic representations, and explores how an organism might use linguistic symbols to represent other things. Two research projects of Sue Savage-Rumbaugh, one explicity teaching twopan troglodytes to use lexigrams intentionally, and the other exploring the ability of several members ofpan paniscus to learn lexigram (...)
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  26. G. Fitzgerald, Is Linguistics a Part of Psychology?score: 42.0
    Noam Chomsky, the founding father of generative grammar and the instigator of some of its core research programs, claims that linguistics is a part of psychology, concerned with a class of cognitive structures employed in speaking and understanding. In a recent book, Ignorance of Language, Michael Devitt has challenged certain core aspects of linguistics, as prominent practitioners of the science conceive of it. Among Devitt’s major conclusions is that linguistics is not a part of psychology. In (...)
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  27. Steven Gross (2001). Essays on Linguistic Context-Sensitivity and its Philosophical Significance. Routledge.score: 42.0
    Drawing upon research in philosophical logic, linguistics and cognitive science, this study explores how our ability to use and understand language depends upon our capacity to keep track of complex features of the contexts in which we converse.
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  28. C. Allibert (2008). Austronesian Migration and the Establishment of the Malagasy Civilization: Contrasted Readings in Linguistics, Archaeology, Genetics and Cultural Anthropology. Diogenes 55 (2):7 - 16.score: 42.0
    This article reviews and contrasts research findings in a variety of disciplines seeking corroboration for theories of settlement in Madagascar. Evidence is considered from the fields of linguistics, archaeology (studies of pottery), cultural anthropology and genetic analysis, leading to conclusions broadly supporting the thesis of Austronesian migrations directly to Madagascar from Kalimantan and Sulawesi around the 5th and 7th centuries CE, which combined with a Bantu group originating from the region of Mozambique. The article nevertheless warns against attributing (...)
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  29. Bilge Say & Varol Akman (1997). Current Approaches to Punctuation in Computational Linguistics. .score: 42.0
    Some recent studies in computational linguistics have aimed to take advantage of various cues presented by punctuation marks. This short survey is intended to summarise these research efforts and additionally, to outline a current perspective for the usage and functions of punctuation marks. We conclude by presenting an information-based framework for punctuation, influenced by treatments of several related phenomena in computational linguistics.
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  30. Robyn Carston & Diane Blakemore, Introduction: Neil Smith's Linguistics.score: 42.0
    Neil Smith has worked across the full range of the discipline of linguistics and explored its interfaces with other disciplines. In all this work he has maintained a commitment to a mentalist approach to the study of language and communication. The aim of this Special Issue is to honour his work and commitment with a collection of papers which brings together work by phonologists, syntacticians, psycholinguists, and pragmatists who share this interest in language as a central component of the (...)
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  31. Robert N. Mccauley (1986). Problem Solving in Science and the Competence Approach to Theorizing in Linguistics. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 16 (3):299–312.score: 42.0
    The goals ofthis paper are to identify (in Section II) some general features of problem solving strategies in science, to discuss (in Section III) how Chomsky has employed two particularly popular discovery strategies in science, and to show (in Section IV) how these strategies inform Chomskyan linguistics. In Section IV I will discuss (1) how their employment in linguistics manifests features of scientific problem solving outlined in Section Il and (2) how an analysis in terms of those features (...)
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  32. Paul Kiparsky, New Perspectives in Historical Linguistics.score: 42.0
    This condensed review of recent trends and developments in historical linguistics proceeds from the empirical to the conceptual, from ‘what’ to ‘how’ to ‘why’. I begin with new findings about the origins, relationships, and diversity of the world’s languages, then turn to the processes and mechanisms of change as they concern practicing historical linguists, continue with efforts to ground change in the acquisition, use, and structure of language, and conclude with a look at ongoing debates concerning the explanatory division (...)
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  33. Barry Smith (2006). Towards a Reference Terminology for Ontology Research and Development in the Biomedical Domain. In Proceedings of KR-MED.score: 42.0
    Ontology is a burgeoning field, involving researchers from the computer science, philosophy, data and software engineering, logic, linguistics, and terminology domains. Many ontology-related terms with precise meanings in one of these domains have different meanings in others. Our purpose here is to initiate a path towards disambiguation of such terms. We draw primarily on the literature of biomedical informatics, not least because the problems caused by unclear or ambiguous use of terms have been there most thoroughly addressed. We advance (...)
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  34. Marcelo Dascal & Asher Idan (1981). Procedures in Scientific Research and in Language Understanding. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 12 (2):226-249.score: 42.0
    Summary Pluralism and monism are the two current views concerning scientific research and language understanding. Between them there is a third, intermediate, view. We take a procedural methodology of science as exemplified in the work of L. Tondl, and procedural linguistics , as exemplified in the work of B. Harrison, to be representative of this third possibility. Procedures are cognitive, linguistic, and physical processes which, through their hierarchical interconnections can generate fruitful mechanisms . These mechanisms are sensitive to (...)
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  35. Asifa Majid (2012). Current Emotion Research in the Language Sciences. Emotion Review 4 (4):432-443.score: 42.0
    When researchers think about the interaction between language and emotion, they typically focus on descriptive emotion words. This review demonstrates that emotion can interact with language at many levels of structure, from the sound patterns of a language to its lexicon and grammar, and beyond to how it appears in conversation and discourse. Findings are considered from diverse subfields across the language sciences, including cognitive linguistics, psycholinguistics, linguistic anthropology, and conversation analysis. Taken together, it is clear that emotional expression (...)
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  36. Jaroslav Peregrin, The Interaction Between Linguistics & Philosophy.score: 42.0
    Like so many sciences, linguistics originated from philosophy's rib. It reached maturity and attained full independence only in the twentieth century (for example, it is a well-known fact that the first linguistics department in the UK was founded in 1944); though research which we would now classify as linguistic (especially leading to generalizations from comparing different languages) was certainly carried out much earlier. The relationship between philosophy and linguistics is perhaps reminiscent of that between an old-fashioned (...)
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  37. Robert Stainton, Provided for Non-Commercial Research and Educational Use Only. Not for Reproduction or Distribution or Commercial Use.score: 42.0
    This article was originally published in the Encyclopedia of Language & Linguistics, Second Edition, published by Elsevier, and the attached copy is provided by Elsevier for the author's benefit and for the benefit of the author's institution, for noncommercial research and educational use including without limitation use in instruction at your institution, sending it to specific colleagues who you know, and providing a copy to your institution’s administrator.
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  38. Ton van der Wouden (1997). Negative Contexts: Collocation, Polarity and Multiple Negation. Routledge.score: 36.0
    Negative polarity is one of the more elusive aspects of linguistics and a subject which has been gaining in importance in recent years. Written from within the well-defined theoretical framework of Generalized Quantifiers, the three main areas considered in this study are collocations, polarity items and multiple negations. In this mature piece of research, van der Wouden takes into account, not only semantic and syntactic considerations, but also to a large extent, pragmatic ones illustrating a wide array of (...)
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  39. Karol Janicki (2006). Language Misconceived: Arguing for Applied Cognitive Sociolinguistics. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.score: 36.0
    Linguistics is important. An understanding of linguistic principles is as essential to the layperson as it is to the language scholar. Using concrete examples from politics, law, and education, this book shows how people misconceive language every day and what the consequences of misconceptions can be. Since the meanings of words are often fuzzy at best, this volume argues for a flexible approach to meaning and definitions, and demonstrates how this approach can help us understand many conflicts. It is (...)
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  40. Jeanette K. Gundel & Nancy Ann Hedberg (eds.) (2008). Reference: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    The ability to produce and understand referring expressions is basic to human language use and human cognition. Reference comprises the ability to think of and represent objects (both real and imagined/fictional), to indicate to others which of these objects we are talking about, and to determine what others are talking about when they use a nominal expression. The articles in this volume are concerned with some of the central themes and challenges in research on reference within the cognitive sciences (...)
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  41. John J. Sung (2008). Embodied Anomaly Resolution in Molecular Genetics: A Case Study of RNAi. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 13 (2):177-193.score: 36.0
    Scientific anomalies are observations and facts that contradict current scientific theories and they are instrumental in scientific theory change. Philosophers of science have approached scientific theory change from different perspectives as Darden (Theory change in science: Strategies from Mendelian genetics, 1991) observes: Lakatos (In: Lakatos, Musgrave (eds) Criticism and the growth of knowledge, 1970) approaches it as a progressive “research programmes” consisting of incremental improvements (“monster barring” in Lakatos, Proofs and refutations: The logic of mathematical discovery, 1976), Kuhn (The (...)
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  42. Patrick Saint-Dizier & Evelyne Viegas (eds.) (1995). Computational Lexical Semantics. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    Lexical semantics has become a major research area within computational linguistics, drawing from psycholinguistics, knowledge representation, computer algorithms and architecture. Research programmes whose goal is the definition of large lexicons are asking what the appropriate representation structure is for different facets of lexical information. Among these facets, semantic information is probably the most complex and the least explored.Computational Lexical Semantics is one of the first volumes to provide models for the creation of various kinds of computerised lexicons (...)
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  43. Will C. van den Hoonaard (2006). The Ethics Trapeze. Journal of Academic Ethics 4 (1-4):1-10.score: 36.0
    This article constitutes the introduction to a collection of essays in volume 4 of JAE, representing an extremely diverse collection of pieces written by authors from equally diverse backgrounds with the purpose of sharing the theoretical and practical issues related to research-ethics, or on ethics more generally. All of the articles are fresh contributions to the research-ethics review debate. The 17 authors of the 12 articles come from the United States, South Africa, and Canada. Their disciplinary or (...) backgrounds include Aboriginal literatures, English literature, English-as-a Second-Language pedagogy, French literature, history, language and literacy, liberal arts, and linguistics – all fields in the cluster of the humanities. The volume also has contributions from social work, sociology, and speech pathology. The world of research-ethics review has become so pervasive that it invades all areas of research: it does not respect disciplinary boundaries. The articles in this special volume represent, in short, a microscope of the research world. (shrink)
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  44. Shira Elqayam & Jonathan Evans (2011). Subtracting “Ought” From “Is”: Descriptivism Versus Normativism in the Study of Human Thinking. BEHAVIORAL AND BRAIN SCIENCES 34 (05):251-252.score: 36.0
    We propose a critique of normativism, defined as the idea that human thinking reflects a normative system against which it should be measured and judged. We analyze the methodological problems associated with normativism, proposing that it invites the controversial “is-ought” inference, much contested in the philosophical literature. This problem is triggered when there are competing normative accounts (the arbitration problem), as empirical evidence can help arbitrate between descriptive theories, but not between normative systems. Drawing on linguistics as a model, (...)
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  45. Martha Stone Palmer (2006). Semantic Processing for Finite Domains. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    A primary problem in the area of natural language processing has been semantic analysis. This book looks at the semantics of natural languages in context. It presents an approach to the computational processing of English text that combines current theories of knowledge representation and reasoning in Artificial Intelligence with the latest linguistic views of lexical semantics. The book will interest postgraduates and researchers in computational linguistics as well as industrial research groups specializing in natural language processing.
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  46. Siamak Movahedi (2012). Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Reported Dreams and the Problem of Double Hermeneutics in Clinical Research. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M12.score: 36.0
    The aim of this article is to show that statistical analysis and hermeneutics are not mutually exclusive. Although statistical analysis may capture some patterns and regularities, statistical methods may themselves generate different types of interpretation and, in turn, give rise to even more interpretations. The discussion is lodged within the context of a quantitative analysis of dream content. I attempted to examine the dialogical texts of reported dreams monologically, but soon found myself returning to dialogic contexts to make sense of (...)
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  47. Sławomir Wacewicz & Przemysław Żywiczyński (forthcoming). Language Evolution: Why Hockett's Design Features Are a Non-Starter. Biosemiotics:1-18.score: 36.0
    The set of design features developed by Charles Hockett in the 1950s and 1960s remains probably the most influential means of juxtaposing animal communication with human language. However, the general theoretical perspective of Hockett is largely incompatible with that of modern language evolution research. Consequently, we argue that his classificatory system—while useful for some descriptive purposes—is of very limited use as a theoretical framework for evolutionary linguistics. We see this incompatibility as related to the ontology of language, i.e. (...)
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  48. Susan Dwyer, Bryce Huebner & Marc D. Hauser (2010). The Linguistic Analogy: Motivations, Results, and Speculations. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):486-510.score: 34.0
    Inspired by the success of generative linguistics and transformational grammar, proponents of the linguistic analogy (LA) in moral psychology hypothesize that careful attention to folk-moral judgments is likely to reveal a small set of implicit rules and structures responsible for the ubiquitous and apparently unbounded capacity for making moral judgments. As a theoretical hypothesis, LA thus requires a rich description of the computational structures that underlie mature moral judgments, an account of the acquisition and development of these structures, and (...)
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  49. Marc D. Hauser, Liane Young & Fiery Cushman (2008). Reviving Rawls's Linguistic Analogy: Operative Principles and the Causal Structure of Moral Actions. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology, Volume 2. MIT Press.score: 30.0
    The thesis we develop in this essay is that all humans are endowed with a moral faculty. The moral faculty enables us to produce moral judgments on the basis of the causes and consequences of actions. As an empirical research program, we follow the framework of modern linguistics.1 The spirit of the argument dates back at least to the economist Adam Smith (1759/1976) who argued for something akin to a moral grammar, and more recently, to the political philosopher (...)
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  50. Sergeiy Sandler (2011). Reenactment: An Embodied Cognition Approach to Meaning and Linguistic Content. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):583-598.score: 30.0
    A central finding in experimental research identified with Embodied Cognition (EC) is that understanding actions involves their embodied simulation, i.e. executing some processes involved in performing these actions. Extending these findings, I argue that reenactment – the overt embodied simulation of actions and practices, including especially communicative actions and practices, within utterances – makes it possible to forge an integrated EC-based account of linguistic meaning. In particular, I argue: (a) that remote entities can be referred to by reenacting actions (...)
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