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  1. Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2014). Paternal-Fetal Harm and Men’s Moral Duty to Use Contraception: Applying the Principles of Nonmaleficence and Beneficence to Men’s Reproductive Responsibility. Medicine Studies 4 (1-4):1-13.
    Discussions of reproductive responsibility generally draw heavily upon the principles of nonmaleficence and beneficence. However, these principles are typically only applied to women due to the incorrect belief that only women can cause fetal harm. The cultural perception that women are likely to cause fetal and child harm is reflected in numerous social norms, policies, and laws. Conversely, there is little public discussion of men and fetal and child harm, which implies that men do not cause such harm. My goal (...)
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  2. Jane Jankowski & Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2014). A Better Half: The Ethics of Hemicorporectomy Surgery. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):289-294.
    This paper discusses the ethical issues related to hemicorporectomy surgery, a radical procedure that removes the lower half of the body in order to prolong life. The literature on hemicorporectomy (HC), also called translumbar amputation, has been nearly silent on the ethical considerations relevant to this rare procedure. We explore five aspects of the complex landscape of hemicorporectomy to illustrate the broader ethical questions related to this extraordinary procedure: benefits, risks, informed consent, resource allocation and justice, and loss and the (...)
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  3. Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2013). Offering Testicular Tissue Cryopreservation to Boys: The Increasing Importance of Biological Fatherhood. American Journal of Bioethics: 13 (3):39 - 40.
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  4. Jane Jankowski & Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2013). Suicide in the Context of Terminal Illness. American Journal of Bioethics: 13 (3):13 - 14.
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  5. Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2012). Competing Social Norms. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):67-84.
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  6. Gwendolyn P. Quinn, Daniel K. Stearsman, Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Devin Murphy (2012). Preserving the Right to Future Children: An Ethical Case Analysis. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):38-43.
    We report on the case of a 2-year-old female, the youngest person ever to undergo ovarian tissue cryopreservation (OTC). This patient was diagnosed with a rare form of sickle cell disease, which required a bone-marrow transplant, and late effects included high risk of future infertility or complete sterility. Ethical concerns are raised, as the patient's mother made the decision for OTC on the patient's behalf with the intention that this would secure the option of biological childbearing in the future. Based (...)
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  7. Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2011). Gametes or Organs? How Should We Legally Classify Ovaries Used for Transplantation in the USA? Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (3):166-170.
    Ovarian tissue transplantation is an experimental procedure that can be used to treat both infertility and premature menopause. Working within the current legal framework in the USA, I examine whether ovarian tissue should be legally treated like gametes or organs in the case of ovarian tissue transplantation between two women. One option is to base classification upon its intended use: ovarian tissue used to treat infertility would be classified like gametes, and ovarian tissue used to treat premature menopause would be (...)
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  8. Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2011). No More Larking Around! Why We Need Male LARCs. Hastings Center Report 41 (5):22-26.
    Modern contraceptives—especially long-acting, reversible contraceptives, or LARCs—are typically seen as a boon for humanity and for women, the majority of their users, in particular. But the disparity between the number and types of female and male LARCs is problematic for at least two reasons: first, because it forces women to assume most of the financial and health-related responsibilities of contraception, and second, because men’s reproductive autonomy is diminished by it. In order to understand how to change our current contraceptive arrangement, (...)
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  9. Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Karen Meagher (2011). Costa Rica's 'White Legend': How Racial Narratives Undermine its Health Care System. Developing World Bioethics 11 (2):99-107.
    A dominant cultural narrative within Costa Rica describes Costa Ricans not only as different from their Central American neighbours, but it also exalts them as better: specifically, as more white, peaceful, egalitarian and democratic. This notion of Costa Rican exceptionalism played a key role in the creation of their health care system, which is based on the four core principles of equity, universality, solidarity and obligation. While the political justification and design of the current health care system does, in part, (...)
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  10. Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Sarah B. Rodriguez (2011). Two Chicks in a Lab with Eggs. Hastings Center Report 41 (3):21-23.
    One winter morning, the two of us—both postdoctoral fellows in medical humanities and bioethics—gathered with a handful of reproductive science graduate students in the lab to watch a demonstration on making alginate beads. Due to their three-dimensional nature, the beads are capable of holding ovarian follicles—the beads act as though they were a small ovary. The scientists in the lab have managed to mature the follicles maintained in the beads into eggs, fertilize these eggs, and produce the birth of live (...)
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  11. Sarah B. Rodriguez & Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2011). Conceiving Wholeness Women, Motherhood, and Ovarian Transplantation, 1902 and 2004. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (3):409-416.
    When one thinks about organ transplantation, the organs that usually come to mind are the heart, or possibly the kidney, the most commonly transplanted organ (UNOS 2008). Transplantations are generally regarded as necessary to the life of the person receiving the transplant or to physiologically improving that life: the transplant is seen as making the recipient “whole” once more (Lederer 2008). While many have commented on the various ethical issues brought forth by the clinical practice of organ transplantation, here we (...)
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  12. Teresa Woodruff, Candace Tingen, Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Sarah Rodriguez (2011). An Obscure Rider Obstructing Science: The Conflation of Parthenotes with Embryos in the Dickey-Wicker Amendment. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (3):20-28.
    (2011). An Obscure Rider Obstructing Science: The Conflation of Parthenotes with Embryos in the Dickey–Wicker Amendment. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 20-28.
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  13. Teresa Woodruff, Candace Tingen, Sarah Rodriguez & Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2011). Practical Parthenote Policy and the Practice of Science. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (3):W1-W2.
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  14. Daniel Basco, Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Sarah Rodriguez (2010). Insuring Against Infertility: Expanding State Infertility Mandates to Include Fertility Preservation Technology for Cancer Patients. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):832-839.
    In this paper, we recommend expanding infertility insurance mandates to people who may become infertile because of cancer treatments. Such an expansion would ensure cancer patients can receive fertility preservation technology (FPT) prior to commencing treatment. We base our proposal for extending coverage to cancer patients on the infertility mandate in Massachusetts because it is one of the most inclusive. While we use Massachusetts as a model, our arguments and analysis of possible routes to coverage can be applied to all (...)
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  15. Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2010). Review of Karey Harwood, The Infertility Treadmill: Feminist Ethics, Personal Choice, and the Use of Reproductive Technologies. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 10 (11):32-34.
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  16. Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2009). Cultural Memory, Empathy, and Rape. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 16 (1):25-42.
    Assuming a relational understanding of the self, I argue that empathy is necessary for individual and cultural recovery from rape. However, gender affects our ability to listen with empathy to rape survivors. For women, the existence of cultural memories discourages empathy either by engendering fear of their own future rape or by provoking sympathy rather than empathy. For men, the lack of cultural memories makes rape what Arendt calls an "unreality," thus diminishing the possibility for empathy. Although empathetic listeningpresents gender (...)
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  17. Lisa Campo-Engelstein (2008). Goodbye Hypatia, My Friend. Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 233-235.