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  1. Lisa Curtis-Wendlandt (2013). Staging Virtue: Women, Death, and Liberty in Elise Reimarus's Cato. Journal of the History of Ideas 74 (1):69-92.
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  2. Lisa Curtis-Wendlandt (2012). No Right to Resist? Elise Reimarus's "Freedom" as a Kantian Response to the Problem of Violent Revolt. Hypatia 27 (4):755 - 773.
    One of the greatest woman intellectuals of eighteenth-century Germany is Elise Reimarus, whose contribution to Enlightenment political theory is rarely acknowledged today. Unlike other social contract theorists, Reimarus rejects a people's right to violent resistance or revolution in her philosophical dialogue Freedom (1791). Exploring the arguments in Freedom, this paper observes a number of similarities in the political thought of Elise Reimarus and Immanuel Kant. Both, I suggest, reject violence as an illegitimate response to perceived political injustice in a way (...)
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  3. Lisa Curtis-Wendlandt (2004). Conversing on Love: Text and Subtext in Tullia D'Aragona's. Hypatia 19 (4).
    : Few philosophical topics are as intertwined with gender questions as the topic of love, which moved center-stage in the diverse literary and philosophical productions of the Renaissance. Situated in the rich cultural environment of Cinquecento, Italy, Tullia d'Aragona's Dialogo della Infinità d'Amore offers not only a unique contribution to Renaissance theories of love, but also forces a reexamination of the aims and methods of communication, and provokes a reflection on philosophy's very own (male) self-conception.
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  4. Lisa Curtis-Wendlandt (2004). Conversing on Love: Text and Subtext in Tullia d'Aragona's Dialogo Della Infinit� d'Amore. Hypatia 19 (4):75-96.
    Few philosophical topics are as intertwined with gender questions as the topic of love, which moved center-stage in the diverse literary and philosophical productions of the Renaissance. Situated in the rich cultural environment of Cinquecento, Italy, Tullia d'Aragona's Dialogo della Infinità d'Amore offers not only a unique contribution to Renaissance theories of love, but also forces a reexamination of the aims and methods of communication, and provokes a reflection on philosophy's very own (male) self-conception.
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