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  1. Lisa Diedrich (2013). Que(E)Rying the Clinic Before AIDS: Practicing Self-Help and Transversality in the 1970s. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (2):123-138.
    In this paper, I offer a treatment of “the clinic” in which the clinic—as concept and space—is que(e)ried, that is, both questioned and made queer. I present two historical case studies that queer clinical thought and practices in the period before AIDS and before the full-blown arrival of queer theory on the western theoretical landscape. These two cases—the practice of self-help developed in the women’s health movement in the United States and the practice of tranversality developed out of and beyond (...)
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  2. Lisa Diedrich (2011). Speeding Up Slow Deaths: Medical Sovereignty Circa 2005. Mediatropes 3 (1):1-22.
    In this essay, I take up the question of the time of medicine in relation to two events in the U.S. from 2005—the Terri Schiavo case and Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. I consider both cases as “mediatized medical events,” that is, as events in which the practices of medicine received considerable media attention at a particular historical moment; or, we might say, as events that brought a convergence between media and medical practices. I juxtapose these two events because, placed (...)
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  3. Lisa Diedrich (2010). Being the Shadow: Witnessing Schizophrenia. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (2):91-109.
    This essay discusses Susan Smiley’s documentary film, Out of the Shadow (2004), and Tina Kotulski’s memoir, Saving Millie: A Daughter’s Story of Surviving Her Mother’s Schizophrenia, as filmic and narrative treatments of their mother’s schizophrenia. Mildred Smiley, and her diagnosis of and treatment for schizophrenia, is at the center of both her daughters’ treatments of mental illness, and in these texts, all three become witnesses to the multiple experiences of mental illness and the multiple events of psychiatric power. As I (...)
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  4. Lisa Diedrich (2007). Doing Queer Love: Feminism, AIDS, and History. Theoria 54 (112):25-50.
    In this essay, I utilize the concept of the echo, as formulated in the historical and methodological work of Michel Foucault and Joan W. Scott, to help theorize the historical relationship between health feminism and AIDS activism. I trace the echoes between health feminism and AIDS activism in order to present a more complex history of both movements, and to try to think through the ways that the coming together of these two struggles in a particular place and time—New York (...)
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  5. Lisa Diedrich (2005). AIDS and Its Treatments: Two Doctors' Narratives of Healing, Desire, and Belonging. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 26 (4):237-257.
    In this essay, I analyze two memoirs—Rafael Campo's The Poetry of Healing: A Doctor's Education in Empathy, Identity, and Desire and Abraham Verghese's My Own Country: A Doctor's Story of a Town and Its People in the Age of AIDS—which describe the effects of treating HIV/AIDS on each doctor's identity, on his desire for community and belonging, and on his identification and/or disidentification with the medical profession in the United States. My readings of Campo and Verghese revolve around three key (...)
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  6. Lisa Diedrich (1998). Invaliden Park, Berlin.''. Topos 22:69-74.
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  7. Lisa Diedrich (1998). La Défense: teures Pflaster mit Konzept. Topos 1998:72-79.
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