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Lisa Gannett [21]Lisa Anne Gannett [1]
  1.  4
    Lisa Gannett (2013). Theodosius Dobzhansky and the Genetic Race Concept. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 44 (3):250-261.
    The use of ‘race’ as a proxy for population structure in the genetic mapping of complex traits has provoked controversy about its legitimacy as a category for biomedical research, given its social and political connotations. The controversy has reignited debates among scientists and philosophers of science about whether there is a legitimate biological concept of race. This paper examines the genetic race concept as it developed historically in the work of Theodosius Dobzhansky from the 1930s to 1950s. Dobzhansky’s definitions of (...)
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  2.  16
    Lisa Gannett (2010). Questions Asked and Unasked: How by Worrying Less About the 'Really Real' Philosophers of Science Might Better Contribute to Debates About Genetics and Race. Synthese 177 (3):363 - 385.
    Increased attention paid to inter-group genetic variability following completion of the Human Genome Project has provoked debate about race as a category of classification in biomedicine and as a biological phenomenon at the level of the genome. Philosophers of science favor a metaphysical approach relying on natural kind theorizing, the underlying assumptions of which structure the questions asked. Limitations arise the more metaphysically invested and less attuned to scientific practice these questions are. Other questions—arguably, those that matter most socially and (...)
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  3.  38
    Lisa Gannett (1999). What's in a Cause?: The Pragmatic Dimensions of Genetic Explanations. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 14 (3):349-373.
    The paper argues for a pragmatic account of genetic explanation. This is to say that when a disease or other trait is termed genetic, the reasons for singling out genes as causes over other, also necessary, genetic and nongenetic conditions are not wholly theoretical but include pragmatic dimensions. Whether the explanation is the presence of a trait in an individual or differences in a trait among individuals, genetic explanations are context-dependent in three ways: they are relative to a causal background (...)
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  4.  42
    Lisa Gannett (2003). Making Populations: Bounding Genes in Space and in Time. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):989-1001.
    At least below the level of species, biological populations are not mind‐independent objects that scientists discover. Rather, biological populations are pragmatically constructed as objects of investigation according to the aims, interests, and values that inform particular research contexts. The relations among organisms that are constitutive of population‐level phenomena (e.g., mating propensity, genealogy, and competition) occur as matters of degree and so give rise to statistically defined open‐ended biological systems. These systems are rendered discrete units to satisfy practical needs and theoretical (...)
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  5.  88
    Lisa Gannett (2001). Racism and Human Genome Diversity Research: The Ethical Limits of "Population Thinking". Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2001 (3):S479-.
    This paper questions the prevailing historical understanding that scientific racism "retreated" in the 1950s when anthropology adopted the concepts and methods of population genetics and race was recognized to be a social construct and replaced by the concept of population. More accurately, a "populational" concept of race was substituted for a "typological one"-this is demonstrated by looking at the work of Theodosius Dobzhansky circa 1950. The potential for contemporary research in human population genetics to contribute to racism needs to be (...)
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  6. Lisa Gannett (2004). The Biological Reification of Race. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (2):323-345.
    A consensus view appears to prevail among academics from diverse disciplines that biological races do not exist, at least in humans, and that race-concepts and race-objects are socially constructed. The consensus view has been challenged recently by Robin O. Andreasen's cladistic account of biological race. This paper argues that from a scientific viewpoint there are methodological, empirical, and conceptual problems with Andreasen's position, and that from a philosophical perspective Andreasen's adherence to rigid dichotomies between science and society, facts and values, (...)
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  7.  33
    Lisa Gannett (2001). Population Thinking. Philosophy of Science 68 (i3):1.
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  8.  20
    James Griesemer, Matthew H. Haber, Grant Yamashita & Lisa Gannett (2005). Critical Notice: Cycles of Contingency – Developmental Systems and Evolution. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):517-544.
    The themes, problems and challenges of developmental systems theory as described in Cycles of Contingency are discussed. We argue in favor of a robust approach to philosophical and scientific problems of extended heredity and the integration of behavior, development, inheritance, and evolution. Problems with Sterelny's proposal to evaluate inheritance systems using his `Hoyle criteria' are discussed and critically evaluated. Additional support for a developmental systems perspective is sought in evolutionary studies of performance and behavior modulation of fitness.
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  9.  21
    Lisa Gannett (2005). Group Categories in Pharmacogenetics Research. Philosophy of Science 72 (5):1232-1247.
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  10.  4
    Lisa Gannett (2003). Making Populations: Bounding Genes in Space and in Time. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):989-1001.
    The paper argues that, at least below the species level, biological populations are not mind-independent objects that are discovered by scientists. Rather, biological populations are pragmatically constituted as objects of investigation according to the aims, interests, and values that inform specific research contexts. Biological populations are defined on the basis of relations among organisms such as breeding, genealogy, and competition. Although these relations are objective, the kind and the degree of relations that are privileged depend on the context of investigation. (...)
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  11.  6
    Lisa Gannett (2014). Biogeographical Ancestry and Race. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 47:173-184.
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  12.  14
    Lisa Gannett (1997). Tractable Genes, Entrenched Social Structures. Biology and Philosophy 12 (3):403-419.
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  13.  41
    Lisa Gannett, The Human Genome Project. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  14.  31
    Lisa Gannett (2008). Review of Harold Kincaid, John Dupré, Alison Wylie (Eds.), Value-Free Science? Ideals and Illusions. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (2).
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  15.  31
    Lisa Gannett (2007). The Case of the Female Orgasm: Bias in the Science of Evolution. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (4):619-638.
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  16.  3
    Lisa Gannett (2013). Projectibility and Group Concepts in Population Genetics and Genomics. Biological Theory 7 (2):130-143.
    Although the category “race” fails as a postulated natural kind, racial, ethnic, national, linguistic, religious, and other group designations might nonetheless be considered projectible insofar as they support inductive inferences in biomedicine. This article investigates what it might mean for group concepts in population genetics and genomics to be projectible and whether the projectibility of such predicates licenses the representation of their corresponding classes as natural kinds according to currently prevailing projectibility-based accounts of natural kinds. The article draws on a (...)
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  17.  3
    Lisa Gannett (2008). The Case of the Female Orgasm. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (4):619-638.
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  18.  0
    Lisa Gannett (2007). Critical Notice. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (4):619-638.
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  19. Lisa Gannett (2014). Echoes From the Cave: Philosophical Conversations Since Plato. OUP Canada.
    Echoes from the Cave: Philosophical Conversations since Plato is an anthology of classic and contemporary readings in philosophy compiled to introduce students to the main problems discussed by philosophers past and present.
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  20. Lisa Gannett (2008). Genes and Society. In Michael Ruse (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Biology. Oxford University Press 451.
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  21.  0
    Lisa Gannett (2007). Race to the Finish: Identity and Governance in an Age of Genomics. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 40 (3):462-464.
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