40 found
Sort by:
  1. Lisa H. Newton (2010). Environmental Ethics and Business. In George G. Brenkert & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics. Oxford University Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Lisa H. Newton (2010). Gambling: Some Afterthoughts. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (1):29-31.
    This article responds to the preceding papers by Fletcher and Pasternack. Accepting Fletcher’s virtue-based approach as a useful starting point, it suggests the need for more careful philosophical work on the morality of gambling.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Lisa H. Newton (2006). Permission to Steal: Revealing the Roots of Corporate Scandal--An Address to My Fellow Citizens. Wiley-Blackwell.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Lisa H. Newton (2005). Business Ethics and the Natural Environment. Wiley-Blackwell.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Lisa H. Newton (2005). Greening Business, Root and Branch: The Forms and Limits of Economic Environmentalism. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 24 (1/2):9-34.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Michael Davis, Christopher Meyers, Lisa H. Newton & Elliot D. Cohen (2004). Report Cards. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3 & 4):161 – 165.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Louis W. Hodges, Lisa H. Newton, Jerry Dunklee, Eugene L. Roberts, Andrew Sikula & Chris Roberts (2004). Cases and Commentaries. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3 & 4):293 – 306.
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Lisa H. Newton (2004). Can Science Tell Us What Is Right? An Argument for the Affirmative, With Qualifications. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 2004:221-233.
    We argue that the goal of natural excellence, discoverable by scientific observation of the species, is appropriately called good, and the proper object of human development and education. That affirmation stands, but we are forced to acknowledge several conceptual difficulties (in the deliberate creation of “natural” excellences, for example, and in cases of plurality of excellences) and a final inability to reconcile human freedom—surely part of the natural excellence of human life—with the need to prevent humans from using that freedom (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Lisa H. Newton, Louis Hodges & Susan Keith (2004). Accountability in the Professions: Accountability in Journalism. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3 & 4):166 – 190.
    Accountability is viewed as a civilizing element in society, with professional accountability formalized in most cases as duties dating to the Greeks and Socrates; journalists must find their own way, without formal professional or government regulation or licensing. Three scholars look at the process in a line from the formal professional discipline to suggesting problems the journalism fraternity faces without regulation to suggesting serious internal ethics conferences as 1 solution to the problem.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Lisa H. Newton (ed.) (2003). Ethics in America: Source Reader. Prentice Hall.
  11. Lisa H. Newton (2003). Gambling. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (1):405-418.
    In all the criticisms that have shadowed the financial industry in recent years, the burden seems to be, that the reckless (as opposed to malicious) bankers too often took money of which they were the appointed stewards, and used it for speculation, especially in junk bonds. AsShaheen Borna and James Lowry argue in their "Gambling and Speculation" (the only article on gambling that I was able to raise on my computer) business speculation is probably wrong, since it is very like (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Lisa H. Newton (2002). A Fine Effort to Square a Circle. Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (4):539-545.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Lisa H. Newton (2002). A Passport for Doing Good. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):1-12.
    Does “business ethics,” as we have developed it in the United States, apply without change when business goes abroad? We argue that we cannot assume, in foreign nations (especially in the developing world), that the assumptions of U.S. business practice and business ethics hold without modification. An attempt to find a universally applicable ethic for global business results in the tentative formulation of “ten commandments” to guide the practice of business in the nations of the world.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Lisa H. Newton (2002). Organization Ethics in Health Care. Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (4):539-546.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Lisa H. Newton (2002). The Ethical Dilemmas of the Biotechnology Industry. In Norman E. Bowie (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Business Ethics. Blackwell. 6--313.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Lisa H. Newton (2002). The Turn to the Local: The Possibility of Returning Health Care to the Community. Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (4):505-526.
    Abstract: It is not too early to suggest that the attempts to place medical care in private hands (through group insurance arrangements) has not fulfilled its promise—or better, the promises that were made for it. Yet history has not been kind to plans to make government the single payer, and the laudable progress in medical technology has placed high-technology medical care beyond the reach of most private budgets. In this paper I suggest that the major problem of the U.S. health (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Lisa H. Newton (2001). A Question of Power. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 20 (3/4):49-78.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Lisa H. Newton (2001). Ethical Dimensions of the Hostile Takeover. In Alan R. Malachowski (ed.), Business Ethics: Critical Perspectives on Business and Management. Routledge. 2--143.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Lisa H. Newton (2001). Outcomes Assessment of an Ethics Program. Teaching Ethics 2 (1):29-67.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Lisa H. Newton (2000). A New Power Agenda. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 19 (2):5-39.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Lisa H. Newton (2000). A Scaffold For Muir. The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 2:219-230.
    Everyone knows that somehow we must protect the natural environment as part of the ethical imperatives of doing business, especially in the era of globalization of business. But where, actually, do we find the structure of ethical imperatives that will support that “must”? The drawbacks of several candidates, some of them discussed in papers elsewhere in this volume, are considered, then supplemented with the Japanese concept of kyosei as supplying a missing link between ethics and the land. In the end, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Lisa H. Newton (2000). Millennial Reservations. Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (1):291-303.
    The decade in which the Business Ethics Quarterly has flourished has been a good one for business and business ethics, in which new guiding theories (like stakeholder theory), new interpretations of older ethical concepts (trust, virtue, and the social contract, for instance), and whole new paradigms of doing business (the Triple Bottom Line) have entered the literature. But practice has not kept up with theory, and the theoretical gains seem to be offset by terrible losses in the temperance of greed, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Lisa H. Newton (1999). Truthis the Daughter of Time: The Real Story of the Nestle Case. Business and Society Review 104 (4):367-395.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Lisa H. Newton (1994). Section A: Affirmative Action and Comparable Worth. In Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Living with Contradictions: Controversies in Feminist Social Ethics. Westview Press. 62.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Lisa H. Newton (1994). Should Incompetent Patients (and Their Families) Be Provided Professional Advocates for an HEC Concurrent Case Review? No. HEC Forum 6 (3):173-175.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Lisa H. Newton (1993). Ethics in America: Encouragement for the Troops. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 27 (3-4):521-526.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Lisa H. Newton (1989). Ethical Imperialism and Informed Consent. Irb 12 (3):10-11.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Lisa H. Newton (1989). The Chainsaws of Greed. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 8 (3):29-61.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Lisa H. Newton (1988). Charting Shark-Infested Waters: Ethical Dimensions of the Hostile Takeover. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 7 (1-2):81 - 87.
    Except for a small clutch of academic shark-defenders, everyone seems to know that hostile takeovers are wrong, destructive of people and industries, and damaging to the long-term competitiveness of corporate America. But analysis of the takeover process, absent insider trading, fails to identify any injury that is not replicated elsewhere in the business system. Current suggestions for remedying the situation seem inadequate, ill-fitted to the problem, or hostile to the entire capitalist system. Could it be that it is that system (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Lisa H. Newton (1986). The Internal Morality of the Corporation. Journal of Business Ethics 5 (3):249 - 258.
    Is good morality the natural outcome of profitable business practices? The thesis explored here is one version of the recent literature on corporate culture, typified by the bestselling In Search of Excellence — that the corporation that creates a strong culture, one that best serves the customer, the product, and the employee, must also be profitable. The thesis turns out to have an historical parallel in Plato's Republic (subtitled, I suppose, In Search of Justice). Parallel virtues can be worked out (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. David Gary Smith & Lisa H. Newton (1984). Physician and Patient: Respect for Mutuality. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 5 (1).
    Philosophers and physicians alike tend to discuss the physician-patient relationship in terms of physician privilege and patient autonomy, stressing the duty of the physician to respect the autonomy and the variously elaborated rights of the patient. The authors of this article argue that such emphasis on rights was initially productive, in a first generation of debate on medical ethical issues, but that it is now time for a second generation effort that will stress the importance of the unique experiential aspects (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Lisa H. Newton (1983). Ethics. Teaching Philosophy 6 (1):63-63.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Lisa H. Newton (1982). Collective Responsibility in Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 7 (1):11-22.
    Traditional medical ethics, developed to apply to the contingencies of individual fee-for-service medical practice, do not always seem to speak to the problems of the new forms and locations of health care: the medical team, the hospital, the organized health-care profession, and the society as a whole as guarantor of all health care and education. It is the purpose of this issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy to articulate guidelines for describing and attributing responsibility for health care in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Lisa H. Newton (1981). Comments on Law, Medicine & Health Care. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 9 (6):49-49.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Lisa H. Newton (1981). Liberty and Laetrile: Implications of Right of Access. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 15 (1):55-67.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Lisa H. Newton (1981). Lawgiving for Professional Life. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 1 (1):41-53.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Lisa H. Newton (1977). Abortion in the Law: An Essay on Absurdity. Ethics 87 (3):244-250.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Lisa H. Newton (1975). Philosophy and Civil Law. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 49:208-217.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Lisa H. Newton (1975). The Supreme Court and Judicial Legislation. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 49:208-217.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Lisa H. Newton (1973). Reverse Discrimination as Unjustified. Ethics 83 (4):308-312.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation