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Profile: Lisa Heldke (Gustavus Adolphus College)
  1. Lisa M. Heldke (2006). White on White/Black on Black (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 20 (4):325-327.
    George Yancy writes that he edited White on White/Black on Black in order “to get white and Black philosophers to name and theorize their own raciated identities within the same philosophical text. … My aim was to create a teachable text, that is, to create a text whereby readers will be able to compare and engage critically the similarities and differences found within and between the critical cadre of both white philosophers and Black philosophers” (7-8). White on White/Black on Black (...)
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  2. Lisa M. Heldke (2004). Deep Democracy: Community, Diversity, Transformation (Review). Hypatia 19 (2):177-180.
  3.  42
    Deane W. Curtin & Lisa M. Heldke (eds.) (1992). Cooking, Eating, Thinking: Transformative Philosophies of Food. Indiana University Press.
    Philosophy has often been criticized for privileging the abstract; this volume attempts to remedy that situation. Focusing on one of the most concrete of human concerns, food, the editors argue for the existence of a philosophy of food.
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  4. Lisa M. Heldke (2004). A du Boisian Proposal for Persistently White Colleges. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (3):224-238.
    What would it look like for a college, white in its history and predominantly white in its present reality, to create a program that responds to, and works in support of, the agenda Du Bois proposes for the “Negro university” of the 1930’s? How can a white college cease to be an obstacle to the liberation of African Americans? That is, how can a persistently white college become actively antiracist and pursue a goal of educating antiracist white students—students who could (...)
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  5. Lisa Heldke (1998). On Being a Responsible Traitor: A Primer. In Bat-Ami Bar On & Ann Ferguson (eds.), Daring to Be Good: Essays in Feminist Ethico-Politics. Routledge 41--54.
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  6.  15
    Lisa Heldke (2006). Farming Made Her Stupid. Hypatia 21 (3):151-165.
    This paper is an examination of stupid knowing—an attempt to catalogue this species of knowing, and to understand when, how and why the concept gets applied to marginalized groups of knowers. I see this project as prep chef work—work that supports and provides conceptual ingredients for others to use. In part, I intend my identification and categorization of stupid knowing to support the work of theorists of resistance who have identified ways that those marginalized as “stupid knowers” use the cloak (...)
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  7. Lisa Heldke (2003). Exotic Appetites: Ruminations of a Food Adventurer. Routledge.
    First published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  8.  25
    Lisa Heldke (1988). Recipes for Theory Making. Hypatia 3 (2):15 - 29.
    This is a paper about philosophical inquiry and cooking. In it, I suggest that thinking about cooking can illuminate our understanding of other forms of inquiry. Specifically, I think it provides us with one way to circumvent the dilemma of absolutism and relativism. The paper is divided into two sections. In the first, I sketch the background against which my project is situated. In the second, I develop an account of cooking as inquiry, by exploring five aspects of recipe creation (...)
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  9.  15
    Lisa M. Heldke & Stephen H. Kellert (1995). Objectivity as Responsibility. Metaphilosophy 26 (4):360-378.
    We present a case for defining objectivity as responsibility. We do not attempt to offer new arguments on epistemological issues such as relativism or the fact-value distinction. Instead, we construct a conception of objectivity utilizing analyses from Deweyan pragmatism, feminist theory, and science studies, organizing them around the concept of responsibility. This conception of objectivity can serve as a tool to guide the process of inquiry; by suggesting that participants reflect on the question "how can this inquiry be made more (...)
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  10.  18
    Lisa M. Heldke (2003). Carnal Appetites: FoodSexIdentities (Review). Hypatia 18 (3):240-242.
  11.  11
    Lisa Heldke (1987). John Dewey and Evelyn Fox Keller: A Shared Epistemological Tradition. Hypatia 2 (3):129 - 140.
    In this paper, I undertake an exploration of the similarities I find between the epistemological projects of John Dewey and Evelyn Fox Keller. These similarities, I suggest, warrant considering Dewey and Keller to share membership in an epistemological tradition, a tradition I label the "Coresponsible Option." In my examination, I focus on Dewey's and Keller's ontological assertion that we live in a world that is an inextricable mixture of certainty and chance, and on their resultant conception of inquiry as a (...)
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  12.  9
    Lisa Heldke (2015). Pragmatist Philosophical Reflections on GMOs. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (5):817-836.
    This essay examines the public debate about the agricultural biotechnologies known as genetically modified organisms, as that debate is being carried out in its most dichotomizing forms in the United States. It attempts to reveal the power of sharply dichotomous thinking, as well as its limits. The essay draws on the work of Michel Serres, who uses the concept of the parasite to reconstruct or reframe fundamental dichotomies in western philosophy; it attempts a similar reframing of the public debates about (...)
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  13.  35
    Lisa Heldke (2013). Restaurant Authenticity. The Philosophers' Magazine 61 (61):94-99.
    I think that restaurant authenticity and personal authenticity are deeply intertwined. More specifically, I think that the ways in which we define – and seek – authenticity in things, be they table setting styles, or cooking vessels or ingredients, directly shape, and are shaped by, the ways in which we understand – and cultivate – authenticity in ourselves. To the extent to which we define culinary authenticity as slavish adherence to the methods, ingredients and utensils of the source culture, we (...)
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  14.  8
    Lisa Heldke (2003). Book Review: Elspeth Probyn. Carnal Appetites: Foodsexidentities. London and New York: Routledge, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 18 (3):240-242.
    Carnal Appetites does not fully work out a single coherent thesis. Rather, it is a preliminary exploration of a set of issues about food, culture and identity. Here is how Probyn describes her project: “The aim of this book is simple but immodest. Through the optic of food and eating, I want to investigate how as individuals we inhabit the present: how we eat into cultures, eat into identities, indeed eat into ourselves. At the same time I am interested in (...)
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  15.  20
    Lisa M. Heldke (2002). Making Sense of Taste: Food and Philosophy (Review). Hypatia 17 (3):283-286.
    This is a book about taste--the thing your tongue (and nose) do. It’s also a book about Taste--the thing the art critic has. It’s a book about food, art, and the relations between food and art. Do those two categories overlap? Where and how? How we might best understand and appreciate food in light of the way we understand and appreciate art? It’s a book about how the divergent histories of taste and Taste have left us with an impoverished understanding (...)
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  16.  23
    Lisa Heldke (1997). In Praise of Unreliability. Hypatia 12 (3):174 - 182.
    Bisexuality challenges familiar assumptions about love, family, and sexual desire that are shared by both heterosexual and homosexual communities. In particular, it challenges the assumption that a person's desire can and should run in only one direction. Furthermore, bisexuality questions the legitimacy, rigidity, and presumed ontological priority of the categories "heterosexual" and "homosexual." Bisexuals are often assumed to be dishonest and unreliable. I suggest that dishonesty and unreliability can be resources for undermining normative sexualities.
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  17.  18
    Lisa Heldke (2012). An Alternative Ontology of Food. Radical Philosophy Review 15 (1):67-88.
    This essay explores some well-traveled territory—the area in which eating and suffering come together. I undertake two projects. First, I scrutinize some foods that are often portrayed as unambiguously either good or bad , in an effort to complicate the stories we tell about them. What violence has been heretofore invisible in them? What compassion has been occluded? This project informs a second: an answer to the question “how should we eat?” My answer takes up Kelly Oliver’s call for an (...)
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  18.  51
    Lisa M. Heldke (2006). Farming Made Her Stupid. Hypatia 21 (3):151-165.
    : This essay is an examination of stupid knowing, an attempt to catalog a particular species of knowing, and to understand when, how, and why the label "stupid" gets applied to marginalized groups of knowers. Heldke examines the ways the defining processes work and the conditions that make them possible, by considering one group of people who get defined as stupid: rural people. In part, the author intends her identification and categorization of stupid knowing to support the work of theorists (...)
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  19.  16
    Lisa Heldke (2010). Dear Kate Bornstein. Radical Philosophy Today 3:101-109.
    In this brief paper, I want to begin to explore the possibility that bi-trans dialogue can challenge those forms of oppression that are grounded in sex, gender, and sexuality. I am particularly interested in pursuing the possibility that bi-trans dialogue might result in additional critiques of the sex-gender-sexuality triad. Despite multiple challenges, and myriad historical transmogri-fications (including, it must be noted, the very late addition of gender), that triad maintains its foundationality and posits deep causal links among its three parts. (...)
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  20.  33
    Lisa Maree Heldke (2006). Farming Made Her Stupid. Hypatia 21 (3):151 - 165.
    This essay is an examination of stupid knowing, an attempt to catalog a particular species of knowing, and to understand when, how, and why the label "stupid" gets applied to marginalized groups of knowers. Heldke examines the ways the defining processes work and the conditions that make them possible, by considering one group of people who get defined as stupid: rural people. In part, the author intends her identification and categorization of stupid knowing to support the work of theorists of (...)
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  21.  13
    Lisa Heldke & Jens Thomsen (2014). Two Concepts of Authenticity. Social Philosophy Today 30:79-94.
    This paper explores two apparently-unrelated forms of authenticity. One, “restaurant authenticity,” is a subcategory of the larger category of authentic objects, focused specifically on food and especially on ethnic cuisines. “Personal authenticity” refers to a set of traits or qualities in oneself. Contrary to appearances, I argue that the two forms of authenticity intertwine in ways that merit thoughtful attentiveness. I suggest that approaching the question of the authenticity of a cuisine with an attitude of flexibility and responsiveness can, in (...)
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  22.  12
    Lisa Heldke (2007). The Radical Potential of Listening: A Preliminary Exploration. Radical Philosophy Today 5:25-46.
    In On Liberty, John Stuart Mill argues that free speech possesses value because listening is valuable: it can advance one’s own thinking and action. However, listening becomes difficult when one finds the views of a speaker to be wrong, repellant, or even simply naïve. Everyday wisdom would have it that such cases present the greatest opportunities for growth. Is there substance to this claim? In particular, is there radical political value to be found in listening to others at the very (...)
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  23.  4
    Lisa Heldke (2004). Book Review: Judith Green. Deep Democracy: Community, Diversity, Transformation. Lanham, Md: Rowman and Littlefield, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 19 (2):177-180.
    Deep Democracy draws upon the insights of American thinkers whose work has received less attention than the "holy trinity" of Peierce, James and Dewey, in order to investigate current philosophical problems and questions. The work does carry out a sustained interaction with the work of Dewey, in the course of exploring the nature of, obstacles to, and prospects for strengthening the fabric of democracy in the contemporary world. But Green also puts Dewey in conversation with Jane Addams, Alain Locke, Martin (...)
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  24.  20
    Lisa Heldke (2006). “Dear Kate Bornstein”. Radical Philosophy Today 3:101-109.
    In an imagined letter to the author of My Gender Workbook, the author of this article recounts classroom discussions about gender identity that led to profound questions regarding the relation between sex, gender, and sexuality. The author argues that more conversation between bisexual and transgender perspectives would continue to unsettle conceptual frameworks for sexuality in helpful ways. The author finds special consequences in this conversation for the concept of gender, especially when it is considered as a reference point for self-exploration (...)
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  25.  3
    Lisa M. Heldke (1990). A Response to Donald Koch's “Recipes, Cooking and Conflict”. Hypatia 5 (1):165-170.
  26.  16
    Lisa Heldke (2007). The Radical Potential of Listening. Radical Philosophy Today 2007:25-46.
    In On Liberty, John Stuart Mill argues that free speech possesses value because listening is valuable: it can advance one’s own thinking and action. However, listening becomes difficult when one finds the views of a speaker to be wrong, repellant, or even simply naïve. Everyday wisdom would have it that such cases present the greatest opportunities for growth. Is there substance to this claim? In particular, is there radical political value to be found in listening to others at the very (...)
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  27.  18
    Lisa Heldke (2003). Book Review: Elspeth Probyn. Carnal Appetites: Foodsexidentities. London and New York: Routledge, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):240-242.
  28.  12
    Lisa Heldke (2001). Do You Really Know How to Cook? Philosophy Now 31:12-15.
    In the Gorgias, Plato contrasts pastry cooking unfavorably with medicine, in order to illustrate the difference he believes exists between a mere knack and a genuine art. I attempt to show that Plato’s treatment of cooking distorts or misconceives that activity, and does so in order to shore up his arguments about the distinction between arts and knacks, and about the separation and hierarchy between minds and bodies. Plato’s treatment of cookery seems to be informed not by the activity of (...)
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  29.  11
    Lisa M. Heldke (1990). A Response to Donald Koch's "Recipes, Cooking and Conflict". Hypatia 5 (1):165 - 170.
    This paper addresses Koch's concern about whether a coresponsible theorist can engage in inquiry with a theorist who is "beyond the pale." On what grounds, he asks, can a coresponsible inquirer argue against one who uses a racist, sexist, or classist model for inquiry? I argue that, in such situations, the coresponsible inquirer brings to inquiry both a theoretical framework, or "attitude," and a set of practical concerns which manifest that attitude.
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  30.  11
    Corrinne Bedecarre, Marilyn Friedman, Lisa M. Heldke, Robert C. Koons, Daniel Bonevac, Carol A. Mickett, Richard J. McGowan, Lynn Hankinson Nelson, Steven Yates & Leonard D. Katz (1993). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 67 (1):23 - 36.
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  31.  10
    Lisa Heldke (1991). Do You Mind If I Speak Freely? Social Theory and Practice 17 (3):349-368.
    In this paper, I develop a way to conceive of free speech that begins by redefining speech. My definition affirms the fact that speaking is an activity that goes on among people in a community. Speaking, I will suggest, is an activity that involves not only the present speaker, but also others who act as listeners and potential speakers. I contend that liberal conceptions of free speech have often proven ill equipped to address certain free speech issues, precisely because they (...)
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  32.  9
    Lisa Maree Heldke (2001). Sexing the Body: Gender Politics and the Construction of Sexuality (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 44 (3):457-459.
  33.  12
    Lisa Heldke (2006). Review of Simona Giordano, Understanding Eating Disorders: Conceptual and Ethical Issues in the Treatment of Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (8).
    Understanding Eating Disorders endeavors to answer the question “How should we behave when dealing with a person with eating disorders?” (254). In the pursuit of this question, Giordano undertakes two primary tasks. First, she constructs an analysis of eating disorders that attempts to show why they should be understood “from a moral perspective. Eating disorders signify a person’s belonging and adherence to a determined moral context” (8). Second, she conducts an exploration of autonomy, and asks whether it is justified to (...)
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  34.  9
    Lisa Heldke (2004). Book Review: Judith Green. Deep Democracy: Community, Diversity, Transformation. Lanham, Md: Rowman and Littlefield, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (2):177-180.
  35.  4
    Lisa Heldke (1998). Unnatural Selection. Ethics and the Environment 3 (1):41 - 54.
    The notion that "nature" comes equipped with its own set of categories, enabling us to divide up everything that exists without overlap or leftovers, has considerable explanatory and prescriptive power. I examine two apparently unrelated arenas in which this notion is at work; namely, in the alleged discovery and subsequent physical "improvement" of the headwaters of the Mississippi River, and in the surgical alteration of intersex infants. In both cases, reconstruction is undertaken as a means of eliminating an ambiguity regarded (...)
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  36.  6
    Lisa Maree Heldke (2004). A Du Boisian Proposal for Persistently White Colleges. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (3):224 - 238.
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  37.  2
    Lisa Maree Heldke (2001). Sexing the Body: Gender Politics and the Construction of Sexuality (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 44 (3):457-459.
  38. Lisa‘John Dewey Heldke & Evelyn Fox Keller (1989). A Shared Epistemological Tradition'. Hypatia 2 (3):129-40.
     
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  39.  4
    Lisa Heldke (2015). Exotic Appetites: Ruminations of a Food Adventurer. Routledge.
  40. Lisa Heldke, Kerri Mommer & Cynthia Pineo (eds.) (2005). The Atkins Diet and Philosophy. Open Court.
    This volume collects sixteen essays by contributors who chew on the diet from a number of philosophical angles and a variety of personal perspectives. Here, you can sample essays written by practitioners of the Atkins diet or one of its low-carb cousins; by people who are not on the diet; and by people who choose to keep mum about their own current relationships to carbohydrates. (We made an editorial decision to respect their right to remain silent on the matter of (...)
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  41. Robert J. Rafalko, Peter Vallentyne, David A. Hoekema, Kathy Squadrito, Lisa Heldke & D. Ouren (1990). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 63 (7):49-65.
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  42.  34
    George Yancy, Barbara Applebaum, Susan E. Babbitt, Alison Bailey, Berit Brogaard, Lisa Heldke, Sarah Hoagland, Cynthia Kaufman, Crista Lebens, Cris Mayo, Alexis Shotwell, Shannon Sullivan, Lisa Tessman & Audrey Thompson (2011). The Center Must Not Hold: White Women Philosophers on the Whiteness of Philosophy. Lexington Books.
    In this collection, white women philosophers engage boldly in critical acts of exploring ways of naming and disrupting whiteness in terms of how it has defined the conceptual field of philosophy. Focuses on the whiteness of the epistemic and value-laden norms within philosophy itself, the text dares to identify the proverbial elephant in the room known as white supremacy and how that supremacy functions as the measure of reason, knowledge, and philosophical intelligibility.
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