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Lisa M. Rasmussen [24]Lisa Marie Rasmussen [1]
  1.  39
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2012). Patient Advocacy in Clinical Ethics Consultation. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (8):1 - 9.
    The question of whether clinical ethics consultants may engage in patient advocacy in the course of consultation has not been addressed, but it highlights for the field that consultants? allegiances, and the boundaries of appropriate professional practice, must be better understood. I consider arguments for and against patient advocacy in clinical ethics consultation, which demonstrate that patient advocacy is permissible, but not central to the practice of consultation. I then offer four recommendations for consultants who engage in patient advocacy, and (...)
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  2.  2
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2012). Advocacy Through a Prism: A Response to Commentaries on “Patient Advocacy in Clinical Ethics Consultation”. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (8):W1 - W3.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 8, Page W1-W3, August 2012.
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  3.  8
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2014). The Case of Vipul Bhrigu and the Federal Definition of Research Misconduct. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (2):411-421.
    The Office of Research Integrity found in 2011 that Vipul Bhrigu, a postdoctoral researcher who sabotaged a colleague’s research materials, was guilty of misconduct. However, I argue that this judgment is ill-considered and sets a problematic precedent for future cases. I first discuss the current federal definition of research misconduct and representative cases of research misconduct. Then, because this case recalls a debate from the 1990s over what the definition of “research misconduct” ought to be, I briefly recapitulate that history (...)
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  4.  69
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2003). Introduction. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (4):399 – 401.
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  5.  1
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2011). An Ethics Expertise for Clinical Ethics Consultation. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (4):649-661.
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  6.  6
    Ana S. Iltis & Lisa M. Rasmussen (2016). The “Ethics” Expertise in Clinical Ethics Consultation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (4):363-368.
    The nature, possibility, and implications of ethics expertise in general and of bioethics expertise in particular has been the focus of extensive debate for over thirty years. What is ethics expertise and what does it enable experts to do? Knowing what ethics expertise is can help answer another important question: What, if anything, makes a claim of expertise legitimate? In other words, how does someone earn the appellation “ethics expert?” There remains deep disagreement on whether ethics expertise is possible, and (...)
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  7.  17
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2011). An Ethics Expertise for Clinical Ethics Consultation. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39 (4):649-661.
    The legitimacy of clinical ethics consultation is often implied to rest on the legitimacy of moral expertise. In turn, moral expertise seems subject to many serious critiques, the success of which implies that clinical ethics consultation is illegitimate. I explore a number of these critiques, and forward “ethics expertise,” as distinct from “moral expertise,” as a way of avoiding these critiques. I argue that “ethics expertise” succeeds in avoiding most of the critiques, captures what clinical ethics consultants might justifiably do, (...)
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  8.  15
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2006). Engineering, Gerrymandering and Expertise in Public Bioethics. HEC Forum 18 (2):125-130.
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  9.  17
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2005). The Ethics and Aesthetics of for-Profit Bioethics Consultation. HEC Forum 17 (2):94-121.
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  10.  49
    Ana Smith Iltis & Lisa M. Rasmussen (2005). Patient Ethics and Responsibilities. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (2):131 – 137.
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  11.  55
    Lisa M. Rasmussen & Ana Smith Iltis (2002). Introduction. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (6):617 – 619.
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  12. Lisa M. Rasmussen (2008). Not All Research is Equal: Taking Social Science Research Into Account. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (11):17 – 18.
  13.  8
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2006). Sinister Innovations: Beware the Co-Optation of Clinical Ethics Consultation. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 40 (2-3):235-242.
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  14.  2
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2016). Clinical Ethics Consultants Are Not “Ethics” Experts—But They Do Have Expertise. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (4):384-400.
    The attempt to critique the profession of clinical ethics consultation by establishing the impossibility of ethics expertise has been a red herring. Decisions made in clinical ethics cases are almost never based purely on moral judgments. Instead, they are all-things-considered judgments that involve determining how to balance other values as well. A standard of justified decision-making in this context would enable us to identify experts who could achieve these standards more often than others, and thus provide a basis for expertise (...)
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  15.  7
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2000). Morality, Religion and Metaphysics: Diverse Visions in Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (4):367 – 377.
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  16.  18
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2010). Christopher Meyers, a Practical Guide to Clinical Ethics Consulting: Expertise, Ethos, and Power. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (1):99-102.
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  17.  4
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2002). H. Tristram Engelhardt, jr. In Kazumasa Hoshino, H. Tristram Engelhardt & Lisa M. Rasmussen (eds.), Bioethics and Moral Content: National Traditions of Health Care Morality: Papers Dedicated in Tribute to Kazumasa Hoshino. Kluwer Academic Publishers 3--1.
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  18.  6
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2009). Book Reviews Veatch, Robert M. Patient, Heal Thyself: How the New Medicine Puts the Patient in Charge . New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. Pp. 304. $29.95 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 119 (4):801-805.
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  19.  3
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2014). On Internal Accountability in Clinical Ethics Consultation. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (6):43-45.
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  20.  2
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2011). Clinical Ethics Consultation's Dilemma, and a Solution. Journal of Clinical Ethics 22 (4):380.
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  21.  1
    Lisa M. Rasmussen (2009). Problems with Minimal-Risk Research Oversight: A Threat to Academic Freedom? IRB: Ethics & Human Research 31 (3):11.
    A subcommittee of the American Association of University Professors has published a report, “Research on Human Subjects: Academic Freedom and the Institutional Review Board” , which argues that institutional review board oversight may pose a threat to academic freedom, and that a different oversight model based on departmental review would both maintain subject protection and eliminate the threat. But the report does not demonstrate that IRBs pose a threat to academic freedom, and using departmental oversight may not sufficiently protect human (...)
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  22.  3
    Lisa M. Rasmussen & Rosemarie Tong (2010). International Perspectives on the Baby Trade. Bioethics 24 (7):ii-iv.
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  23.  2
    Kazumasa Hoshino, H. Tristram Engelhardt & Lisa M. Rasmussen (eds.) (2002). Bioethics and Moral Content: National Traditions of Health Care Morality: Papers Dedicated in Tribute to Kazumasa Hoshino. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Is there only one bioethics? Is a global bioethics possible? Or, instead, does one encounter a plurality of bioethical approaches shaped by local cultural and national traditions? Some thirty years ago a field of applied ethics emerged under the rubric `bioethics'. Little thought was given at the time to the possibility that this field bore the imprint of a particular American set of moral commitments. This volume explores the plurality of moral perspectives shaping bioethics. It is inspired by Kazumasa Hoshino's (...)
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  24. Lisa M. Rasmussen (2015). Families and Individuals in Medical Decision Making. In Ruiping Fan (ed.), Family-Oriented Informed Consent. Springer International Publishing
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