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Profile: Lisa Tessman (State University of New York at Binghamton)
  1. Lisa Tessman (2013). “Virtue Ethics and Moral Failure: Lessons From Neuroscientific Moral Psychology”. In Michael Austin (ed.), Virtues in Action: New Essays in Applied Virtue Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
  2. Lisa Tessman (2011). The Moral Skeptic. By Anita Superson. Hypatia 26 (4):883-887.
  3. Lisa Tessman (2010). Idealizing Morality. Hypatia 25 (4):797 - 824.
    Implicit in feminist and other critiques of ideal theorizing is a particular view of what normative theory should be like. Although I agree with the rejection of ideal theorizing that oppression theorists (and other theorists of justice) have advocated, the proposed alternative of nonideal theorizing is also problematic. Nonideal theorizing permits one to address oppression by first describing (nonideal) oppressive conditions, and then prescribing the best action that is possible or feasible given the conditions. Borrowing an insight from the "moral (...)
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  4. Lisa Tessman (2010). “Against the Whiteness of Ethics: Dilemmatizing as a Critical Approach”. In George Yancy (ed.), The Center Must Not Hold.
    Charles Mills has critiqued of the whiteness of the discipline of Philosophy by showing how ideal theorizing dominates Anglo-American philosophy and functions there as ideology, while it is non-ideal theorizing that can better attend to the realities of racialized lives. This paper investigates how idealization within the subfield of ethics leads mainstream ethical theorizing to fail to reflect moral life under racial and other forms of domination and oppression. The paper proposes recognizing the dilemmaticity that moral life tends to exhibit (...)
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  5. Lisa Tessman (2009). Expecting Bad Luck. Hypatia 24 (1):9-28.
    This paper draws on Claudia Card’s discussions of moral luck to consider the complicated moral life of people—described as pessimists—who accept the heavy knowledge of the predictability of the bad moral luck of oppression. The potential threat to ethics posed by this knowledge can be overcome by the pessimist whose resistance to oppression, even in the absence of hope, expresses a sense of still having a ‘‘claim’’ on flourishing despite its unattainability under oppression.
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  6. Lisa Tessman (ed.) (2009). Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non-Ideal. Springer.
    Characterizing feminist ethics and social and political philosophy as marked by a tendency to be non-idealizing serves to thematize the volume, while still ...
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  7. Lisa Tessman (2009). Feminist Eudaimonism: Eudaimonism as Non-Ideal Theory. In , Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non-Ideal. Springer. 47--58.
    This paper considers whether eudaimonism is necessarily an idealizing approach to ethics. I argue, contrary to what is implied by Christine Swanton, that it is not, and I suggest that a non-ideal eudaimonistic virtue ethics can be useful for feminist and critical race theorists. For eudaimonist theorists in the Aristotelian tradition, the claim that one should aim to live virtuously assumes that there will typically be good enough background conditions so that an exercise of the virtues, in conjunction with these (...)
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  8. Lisa Tessman (2008). Reply to Critics. Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 205-216.
    Tessman responds to her three critics’ comments on Burdened Virtues, focusing on their concerns with her stipulation of an “inclusivity requirement,” according to which one cannot be said to flourish without contributing to the flourishing of an inclusive collectivity. Tessman identifies a naturalized approach to ethics—which she distinguishes from the naturalism she implicitly endorsed in Burdened Virtues—that illuminates how a conception of flourishing that meets the inclusivity requirement could carry moral authority.
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  9. Linda Martín Alcoff, Bat-Ami Bar On, Laura Cannon, Ann Ferguson, Marilyn Frye, Alison M. Jaggar, Alison Kafer, Jean Keller, Sarah Clark Miller, Michele Moody-Adams, Lisa Tessman & Shelley Wilcox (2005). Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  10. Lisa Tessman (2005). Burdened Virtues: Virtue Ethics for Liberatory Struggles. Oxford University Press.
    Lisa Tessman's Burdened Virtues is a deeply original and provocative work that engages questions central to feminist theory and practice, from the perspective of Aristotelian ethics. Focused primarily on selves who endure and resist oppression, she addresses the ways in which devastating conditions confronted by these selves both limit and burden their moral goodness, and affect their possibilities of flourishing. She describes two different forms of "moral trouble" prevalent under oppression. The first is that the oppressed self may be morally (...)
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  11. Lisa Tessman (2005). The Burdened Virtues of Political Resistance. In Barbara S. Andrew, Jean Clare Keller & Lisa H. Schwartzman (eds.), Feminist Interventions in Ethics and Politics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
     
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  12. Lisa Tessman (2002). On (Not) Living the Good Life. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (Supplement):3-32.
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  13. Lisa Tessman (2002). On (Not) Living the Good Life: Reflections on Oppression, Virtue, and Flourishing. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (sup1):2-32.
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  14. Lisa Tessman (2001). Critical Virtue Ethics: Understanding Oppression as Morally Damaging. In Peggy DesAutels & Joanne Waugh (eds.), Feminists Doing Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield.
    A critically revised Aristotelian-based virtue ethics has something potentially useful to offer to those engaged in analyzing oppression and creating liberatory projects. A critical virtue ethics can help clarify one of the ways in which oppression interferes with flourishing; specifically, it helps clarify an aspect of oppression that can be called "moral damage.".
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  15. Lisa Tessman & Bat-Ami Bar On (eds.) (2001). Jewish Locations: Traversing Racialized Landscapes. Rowman & Littlefield.
    This volume brings together essays that reflect on ontological and moral dilemmas regarding Jewish identity and race. The reflections offered here take place in the context of post-Holocaust transformations and pay special attention to the double processes of the deracialization of Jews qua Jews and the recasting of Jews both in reracialized and in other terms. As a result, the essays bring together and create intersections between Jewish studies and critical theories of race and help stretch the limits of as (...)
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  16. Lisa Tessman (2000). Moral Luck in the Politics of Personal Transformation. Social Theory and Practice 26 (3):375-395.
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  17. Alison Bailey, Bat Ami Bar-On, Linda Lopez-McAlister, Lisa Tessman, Judy Scales-Trent & Naomi Zack (1999). Whiteness: Feminist Philosophical Reflections. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  18. Lisa Tessman (1999). The Racial Politics of Mixed Race. Journal of Social Philosophy 30 (2):276–294.
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  19. Lisa Tessman (1998). Dangerous Loyalties and Liberatory Politics. Hypatia 13 (4):18 - 39.
    While communities engaged in liberatory struggles have valued group loyalty and condemned betrayal, loyalty itself may be problematic, because remaining loyal to a community may require that one refrain from deconstructing the group identity on which the community is based. This essay investigates what loyalty is and whether loyalty is a virtue, and considers why, if loyalty is indeed a virtue, it may be one that is difficult to maintain in a context of oppression.
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  20. Lisa Tessman (1995). Who Are My People? International Studies in Philosophy 27 (1):105-117.
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