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Profile: Lisa Warenski (City College of New York, City University of New York)
  1. Lisa Warenski (forthcoming). The Mystery of Mirror. In Jason Holt (ed.), The Philosophy of Leonard Cohen: Various Positions. Open Court. 101-112.
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  2. Lisa Warenski (2014). Defending Moral Mind-Independence: The Expressivist's Precarious Turn. Philosophia 42 (3):861-69.
    A central feature of ordinary moral thought is that moral judgment is mind-independent in the following sense: judging something to be morally wrong does not thereby make it morally wrong. To deny this would be to accept a form of subjectivism. Neil Sinclair (2008) makes a novel attempt to show how expressivism is simultaneously committed to (1) an understanding of moral judgments as expressions of attitudes and (2) the rejection of subjectivism. In this paper, I discuss Sinclair’s defense of anti-subjectivist (...)
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  3. Lisa Warenski (2014). Essays on A Priori Knowledge and Justification. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 64 (256):538-40.
  4. Lisa Warenski (2014). The Mystery of the Mirror. In Jason Holt (ed.), The Philosophy of Leonard Cohen: Various Positions. Open Court. 101-112.
    Leonard Cohen’s celebrated song “Suzanne” exhibits a certain conception of self-awareness and intersubjectivity that is embraced by phenomenologists and some psychologists. A key element of this conception is that we have pre-reflective self-awareness, including and especially bodily self-awareness. We are tacitly and pre-reflectively aware of ourselves in experience. A second, related element concerns reflective functioning. Reflective functioning is the ability to appreciate oneself and others as being “minded,” that is to say, as having beliefs, desires, and emotions with intentional content. (...)
     
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  5. Lisa Warenski (2014). When Is True Belief Knowledge? By Richard Foley. [REVIEW] Mind:doi: 10.1093/mind/fzu/03.
  6. Lisa Warenski (2012). Erratum To: Naturalism, Fallibilism, and the a Priori. Philosophical Studies 159 (2):321-321.
    Erratum to: Naturalism, fallibilism, and the a priori Content Type Journal Article Category Erratum Pages 1-1 DOI 10.1007/s11098-012-9889-4 Authors Lisa Warenski, USA Journal Philosophical Studies Online ISSN 1573-0883 Print ISSN 0031-8116.
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  7. Lisa Warenski (2012). "Relative Uncertainty in Term Loan Projection Models: What Lenders Could Tell Risk Managers&Quot;. Journal of Experimental and Artificial Intelligence 24 (4):501-511.
    This article examines the epistemology of risk assessment in the context of financial modelling for the purposes of making loan underwriting decisions. A financing request for a company in the paper and pulp industry is considered in some detail. The paper and pulp industry was chosen because (1) it is subject to some specific risks that have been identified and studied by bankers, investors and managers of paper and pulp companies and (2) certain features of the industry enable analysts to (...)
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  8. Lisa Warenski (2010). "Naturalistic Epistemologies and A Priori Justification&Quot;. In Marcin Milkowski & Konrad Kalmont-Taminski (eds.), Beyond Description: Naturalism and Normativity. College Publications.
    Broadly speaking, a naturalistic approach to epistemology seeks to explain human knowledge – and justification in particular – as a phenomenon in the natural world, in keeping with the tenets of naturalism. Naturalism is typically defined, in part, by a commitment to scientific method as the only legitimate means of attaining knowledge of the natural world. Naturalism is often thought to entail empiricism by virtue of this methodological commitment. However, scientific methods themselves may incorporate a priori elements, so empiricism does (...)
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  9. Lisa Warenski (2009). Naturalism, Fallibilism, and the a Priori. Philosophical Studies 142 (3):403 - 426.
    This paper argues that a priori justification is, in principle, compatible with naturalism—if the a priori is understood in a way that is free of the inessential properties that, historically, have been associated with the concept. I argue that empirical indefeasibility is essential to the primary notion of the a priori; however, the indefeasibility requirement should be interpreted in such a way that we can be fallibilist about apriori-justified claims. This fallibilist notion of the a priori accords with the naturalist’s (...)
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  10. Lisa Warenski (2004). Mutti's Making Up Your Mind by Robert Mutti. Informal Logic 23 (1).
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