Search results for 'Literature, Modern Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mark D. Gedney & World Congress of Philosophy (2000). Modern Philosophy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  2. Stephen F. Brown & International Society for the Study of Medieval Philosophy (1998). Meeting of the Minds the Relations Between Medieval and Classical Modern European Philosophy : Acts of the International Colloquium Held at Boston College, June 14-16, 1996 Organized by the Société Internationale Pour l'Étude de la Philosophie Médiévale. [REVIEW]
     
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  3.  6
    Duncan F. Kennedy (2013). Antiquity and the Meanings of Time: A Philosophy of Ancient and Modern Literature. I.B. Tauris.
    Does Augustine put his finger on time? -- Time for history -- Determination -- Self-determination -- Time, knowledge and truth.
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  4. William Franke (ed.) (2007). On What Cannot Be Said: Apophatic Discourses in Philosophy, Religion, Literature, and the Arts: Volume 2: Modern and Contemporary Transformations. University of Notre Dame Press.
    “Any writer worth his salt knows that what cannot be spoken is ultimately the thing worth speaking about; yet most often this humbling awareness is unsaid or covered up. There are some who have made it their business, however, to court failure and acknowledge defeat, to explore the impasse of words before silence. William Franke has created an anthology of such explorations, undertaken in poetry and prose, that stretches from Plato to the present. Whether the subject of discourse is All (...)
     
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  5. J. G. Schurman (1889). The Literature of Modern Philosophy in England and America, 1886-1888. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 2:330.
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  6.  16
    P. V. Zima (2010). Modern/Postmodern: Society, Philosophy, Literature. Continuum.
    Presents an original theoretical system to explain and contrast modernism and postmodernism.
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  7.  2
    J. Shaw, Vijay Bharadwaha, S. Bhatt, W. Hudson & Ian Netton (1992). Review of Form and Validity in Indian Logic, by Vijay Bharadwaja ; The Word and The World: India's Contribution to the Study of Language, by Bimal Krishna Matilal ;The Basic Ways of Knowing, by Govardhan P. Bhatt ; The Quest for Man, Ed. J. Van Nispen and D. Tiemersma ; Muslim-Christian Encounters: Perceptions and Misperceptions, by William Montgomery Watt ; Socrates in Mediaeval Arabic Literature, by Ilai Alon, in Islamic Philosophy, Theology and Science, Texts and Studies, Vol. 10 ; Tsung-Mi and the Sinification of Buddhism, by Peter N. Gregory ; Modern Civilization: A Crisis of Fragmentation, by S. C. Malik ; and Nature in Asian Traditions of Thought: Essays in Environmental Philosophy, Ed. J. Baird Callicott and Roger T. Ames. [REVIEW] Asian Philosophy 2 (2):187-210.
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  8. Frank Palmeri (2006). Deconstructing the Animal-Human Binary: Recent Work in Animal Studies: Review of Elephant Slaves and Pampered Parrots: Exotic Animals in Eighteenth-Century Paris by Louise E. Robbins, Experimenting with Humans and Animals: From Galen to Animal Rights by Anita Guerrini, Figuring Animals: Essays on Animal Images in Art, Literature, Philosophy, and Popular Culture, Edited by Mary Sanders Pollock and Catherine Rainwater, Renaissance Beasts: Of Animals, Humans, and Other Wonderful Creatures, Edited by Erica Fudge, Romanticism and Animal Rights by David Perkins, Savages and Beasts: The Birth of the Modern Zoo by Nigel Rothfels, and Zoontologies: The Question of the Animal, Edited by Cary Wolfe. [REVIEW] Clio 36:407-420.
     
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  9.  6
    Peter Anstey & Jocelyn Harris (2012). Introduction: Women, Philosophy and Literature in the Early Modern Period. Intellectual History Review 22 (3):323-325.
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  10.  14
    Bruce Milem (2010). On What Cannot Be Said: Apophatic Discourses in Philosophy, Religion, Literature and the Arts. Volume One:Classic Formulations. Edited with Theoretical and Critical Essays by William Franke and On What Cannot Be Said: Apophatic Discourses in Philosophy, Religion, Literature and the Arts. Volume Two:Modern and Contemporary Transformations. Edited with Theoretical and Critical Essays by William Franke. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 51 (1):174-175.
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  11. Tania L. Gergel (2004). Plato as Literature (J.) Annas and (C.) Rowe Eds. New Perspectives on Plato, Modern and Ancient. Harvard UP, 2002. Pp. Xii + 270. £33.50. 0674010183. (A.) Michelini Ed. Plato as Author. The Rhetoric of Philosophy. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2003. Pp. Vii + 359. €40/$50. 9004128786. (S.) Blondell The Play of Character in Plato's Dialogues. Cambridge UP, 2002. Pp. Xi + 452. £55/$75. 0521793009. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:174-178.
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  12. Harry Slochower (1964). Literature and Philosophy Between Two World Wars the Problem of Alienation in a War Culture. Citadel Press.
     
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  13. Harry Slochower (1945). Literature and Philosophy Between Two World Wars. New York, Citadel Press.
     
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  14. Jason Bahbak Mohaghegh (2010). New Literature and Philosophy of the Middle East: The Chaotic Imagination. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: Images of Chaos: An Introduction * Tactic I: Desertion (chaotic movement) * First Annihilation: Fall of Being, Burial of the Real * Tactic II: Contagion (chaotic transmission) * Second Annihilation: Betrayal, Fracture, and the Poetic Edge * Tactic III: Shadow-Becoming (chaotic appearance) * Chaos-Consciousness: Towards Blindness * Tactic IV: The Inhuman (chaotic incantation) * Epilogue: Corollaries of Emergence.
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  15.  39
    Simon Critchley (2004). Very Little-- Almost Nothing: Death, Philosophy, Literature. Routledge.
    Very Little ... Almost Nothing puts the question of the meaning of life back at the center of intellectual debate. Its central concern is how we can find a meaning to human finitude without recourse to anything that transcends that finitude. A profound but secular meditation on the theme of death, Critchley traces the idea of nihilism through Blanchot, Levinas, Jena Romanticism and Cavell, culminating in a reading of Beckett, in many ways the hero of the book. For this Second (...)
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  16. Richard Eldridge, Martha C. Nussbaum & Frank Palmer (1998). On Moral Personhood: Philosophy, Literature, Criticism, and Self-Understanding. Journal of Religious Ethics 26 (2):409-431.
    Frank Palmer, Richard Eldridge, and Martha Nussbaum explore the contributions that imaginative literature can make to ethics. From three different moral philosophical perspectives, they argue that reading literature can help persons to achieve greater moral understanding. This essay examines how each author conceives of moral understanding, particularly in its emotional dimension, and how each thinks that reading literature can promote moral understanding. The essay also considers some implications of this work for religious ethics.
     
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  17.  33
    Mark Edmundson (1995). Literature Against Philosophy, Plato to Derrida: A Defence of Poetry. Cambridge University Press.
    This timely book argues that the institutionalisation of literary theory, particularly within American and British academic circles, has led to a sterility of thought which ignores the special character of literary art. Mark Edmundson traces the origins of this tendency to the ancient quarrel between philosophy and poetry, in which Plato took the side of philosophy; and he shows how the work of modern theorists - Foucault, Derrida, de Man and Bloom - exhibits similar drives to subsume (...)
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  18.  14
    Nancy Yousef (2004). Isolated Cases: The Anxieties of Autonomy in Enlightenment Philosophy and Romantic Literature. Cornell University Press.
    While individuals presented in central texts of the period are indeed often alone or separated from others, Yousef regards this isolation as a problem the texts attempt to illuminate, rather than a condition they construct as normative or ...
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  19. Konstantin Kolenda (1982). Philosophy in Literature: Metaphysical Darkness and Ethical Light. Barnes & Noble Books.
     
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  20. Konstantin Kolenda (1982). Philosophy in Literature Metaphysical Darkness and Ethical Light /Konstantin Kolenda. --. --. Barnes & Noble, Books,1982.
     
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  21. Burton Frederick Porter (2006). The Head & the Heart: Philosophy in Literature. Humanity Books.
     
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  22. Jeremy Shaw (2001). "Single Vision and Newton's Sleep": The Enlightenment and Modern Literature: Notes on the Occlusion of Modern Consciousness, and Towards a Reparative Literary Strategy. Shaker.
  23. Colin Wilson (1989). Existentially Speaking: Essays on the Philosophy and Literature. Borgo Press.
     
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  24. Tracy Llanera (forthcoming). Of Private Selves and Public Morals: Philosophy and Literature in Modernity. In Philippa Kelly, Emily Finlay & Tom Clark (eds.), Worldmaking: Literature, Language, Culture. John Benjamins
    What is the moral, spiritual, and educative function of philosophy and literature in modern lives? Such a large question is rarely posed by philosophers or literary theorists these days, but one philosopher who has put it at the top of his agenda is Richard Rorty. His general answer is that both literature and philosophy serve distinct ends: the private end of personal fulfilment through the redescription of experiences and the possibility of self-creation, and the public end of (...)
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  25.  12
    Werner Hamacher (1996). Premises: Essays on Philosophy and Literature From Kant to Celan. Harvard University Press.
    It is quite clear to me that there is nothing presently available to rival this book." —Wlad Godzich, University of Geneva "Hamacher's Premises is the heir and successor to the most important theoretical and critical work done in American ...
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  26.  32
    Genevieve Lloyd (1993). Being in Time: Selves and Narrators in Philosophy and Literature. Routledge.
    Being in Time is a provocative and accessible essay on the fragmentation of the self as explored in philosophy and literature. This original study is unique in its focus on the literary aspects of philosophical writing and their interactions with philosophical content. It explores the emotional aspects of the human experience of time commonly neglected in philosophical investigation by looking at how narrative creates and treats the experience of the self as fragmented and the past as "lost." Genevieve Lloyd (...)
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  27. Alwin Nikolais (2005). The Nikolais/Louis Dance Technique: A Philosophy and Method of Modern Dance. Routledge.
    The Nikolais/Louis Dance Technique provides the definite resource for understanding and practicing the influential dance technique developed by two pioneers of modern dance, Alwin Nikolais and Murray Louis. The Nikolais/Louis technique is presented in a week-to-week classroom manual, providing an indispensable tool for teachers and students of this widely studied movement practice. Theoretical background for further reading is set off from the manual for those interested in deeper study. Their philosophy and methodology span a broad readership and offer (...)
     
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  28. George Santayana & Royal Society of Literature (1933). Some Turns of Thought in Modern Philosophy Five Essays. University Press.
    Originally published in 1933, this book contains five philosophical essays by the famous philosopher and essayist George Santayana. The topics cover both older philosophy, such as those of Locke, as well as philosophy's relationship to newer discoveries, such as the theory of relativity. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in twentieth-century philosophy and the writings of Santayana.
     
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  29. Claudia Brodsky Lacour (1996). Lines of Thought: Discourse, Architectonics, and the Origin of Modern Philosophy. Duke University Press Books.
    It is considerably easier to say that modern philosophy began with Descartes than it is to define the modernity and philosophy to which Descartes gave rise. In _Lines of Thought_, Claudia Brodsky Lacour describes the double origin of modern philosophy in Descartes’s _Discours de la méthode_ and _Géométrie_, works whose interrelation, she argues, reveals the specific nature of the modern in his thought. Her study examines the roles of discourse and writing in Cartesian method (...)
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  30. Claudia Brodsky Lacour (1996). Lines of Thought: Discourse, Architectonics, and the Origin of Modern Philosophy. Duke University Press Books.
    It is considerably easier to say that modern philosophy began with Descartes than it is to define the modernity and philosophy to which Descartes gave rise. In _Lines of Thought_, Claudia Brodsky Lacour describes the double origin of modern philosophy in Descartes’s _Discours de la méthode_ and _Géométrie_, works whose interrelation, she argues, reveals the specific nature of the modern in his thought. Her study examines the roles of discourse and writing in Cartesian method (...)
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  31. John Perry (2001). Dissolving the Inerrancy Debate: How Modern Philosophy Shaped the Evangelical View of Scripture. Quodlibet 3.
    The debate among American evangelicals over scriptural inerrancy has received less attention in recent literature than it did during its height in the 1970s and 1980s. Nonetheless the issue itself remains unresolved; indeed, many consider it beyond hope of resolution. Recent work by certain philosophers, however, suggests that there is a way out-not by resolving the debate but by dissolving it. In particular, a model developed by Nancey Murphy for understanding the history of the split between Protestant liberals and conservatives (...)
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  32. Paul Cefalu (2007). English Renaissance Literature and Contemporary Theory: Sublime Objects of Theology. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Cefalu offers the first sustained assessment of the ways in which recent contemporary philosophy and cultural theory -- including the work of Giorgio Agamben, Alain Badiou, Eric Santner, Slavoj Žižek, and Alenka Zupancic -- can illuminate Early Modern literature and culture. The book argues that when selected Early Modern devotional poets set out to represent subject-God relations, they often encounter some sublime aspect of God that, in Slovenian-Lacanian terms, seems "Other" to himself. This divine Other, while sometimes (...)
     
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  33.  19
    Gil Anidjar (2002). "Our Place in Al-Andalus": Kabbalah, Philosophy, Literature in Arab Jewish Letters. Stanford University Press.
    The year 1492 is only the last in a series of “ends” that inform the representation of medieval Spain in modern Jewish historical and literary discourses. These ends simultaneously mirror the traumas of history and shed light on the discursive process by which hermetic boundaries are set between periods, communities, and texts. This book addresses the representation of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries as the end of al-Andalus (Islamic Spain). Here, the end works to locate and separate Muslim from (...)
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  34. Vishwanath Pandey (ed.) (1976). The Orient: The World of Jainism: Jaina History, Art, Literature, Philosophy and Religion. Pandey.
    Pandey, V. Introduction.--Kalelkar, K. S. Jainism, a familyhood of all religions.--David, M. D. From Risabha to Mahavira.--Chalil, J. E. Glimpses of Southern Jainism.--Gopani, A. S. Life and culture in Jaina narrative literature, 8th, 9th and 10th century A.D.--Gopani, A. S. Position of women in Jaina literature.--Ranka, R. Evolution of Jaina thought.--Pandey, V. Jaina philosophy and religion.--Shah, C. C. Jainism and modern life.--Sankalia, H. D. The great renunciation.--Shah, U. P. Jaina contribution to Indian art.--Gorakshkar, S. Early metal images of (...)
     
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  35.  31
    Barry Stocker (2007). The Novel and Hegel's Philosophy of Literature. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 12:43-48.
    Hegel's philosophy of literature, in the Aesthetics and other texts, gives no extended discussion of the novel. Hegel's predecessor Friedrich Schlegel had produced a philosophy of literature with a central position for the novel. Schlegel's discussion of the novel is based on a view of Irony which allows the novel to be the fusion of poetry and philosophy. Hegel retained a place for art, including poetry, below that of philosophy. The Ironic conception of the novel has (...)
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  36. Jennifer Anna Gosetti-Ferencei (2010). The Ecstatic Quotidian: Phenomenological Sightings in Modern Art and Literature. Penn State University Press.
    Fascination with quotidian experience in modern art, literature, and philosophy promotes ecstatic forms of reflection on the very structure of the everyday world. Gosetti-Ferencei examines the ways in which modern art and literature enable a study of how we experience quotidian life. She shows that modernism, while exhibiting many strands of development, can be understood by investigating how its attentions to perception and expectation, to the common quality of things, or to childhood play gives way to experiences (...)
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  37. D. Z. Phillips (1991). From Fantasy to Faith the Philosophy of Religion and Twentieth-Century Literature. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  38.  11
    Paul O'mahoney (2011). Opposing Political Philosophy and Literature: Strauss's Critique of Heidegger and the Fate of the'Quarrel Between Philosophy and Poetry'. Theoria 58 (126):73-96.
    Strauss's critique of Heidegger's philosophy aims at a recovery of political philosophy, which he saw as threatened by Heidegger's radical historicism; for Strauss, philosophy as a whole could not survive without political philosophy, and his return to the classical tradition of political philosophy, while inspired by the work of Heidegger, was directed against what he saw as the nihilism that was its consequence. Here I wish to examine a dimension of Strauss's critique which, though hinted (...)
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  39.  6
    Marian Hillar (2013). What Does Modern Science Say About the Origin of Cooperation? Science Confirms Philosophy. Dialogue and Universalism 23 (3):23-34.
    During the last decades evolutionary science has made significance progress in the elucidation of the process of human evolution and especially of human behavioral characteristics. These themes were traditionally subjects of inquiry in philosophy and theology. Already Darwin suggested an evolutionary and biological basis for moral sense or conscience, and answered Kant’s question about the origin of the moral rules postulated by philosophers. This article reviews the current status of such investigations by natural scientists, biologists and psychologists, and compares (...)
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  40. David Brenner (ed.) (2013). Night Passages: Philosophy, Literature, and Film. Cup.
    In the beginning was the night. All light, shapes, language, and subjective consciousness, as well as the world and art depicting them, emerged from this formless chaos. In fantasy, we seek to return to this original darkness. Particularly in literature, visual representations, and film, the night resiliently resurfaces from the margins of the knowable, acting as a stage and state of mind in which exceptional perceptions, discoveries, and decisions play out. Elisabeth Bronfen investigates the nocturnal spaces in which extraordinary events (...)
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  41. Peter Fenves (ed.) (1999). Premises: Essays on Philosophy and Literature From Kant to Celan. Stanford University Press.
    "Poetry does not impose, it exposes itself," wrote Paul Celan. Werner Hamacher's investigations into crucial texts of philosophical and literary modernity show that Celan's apothegm is also valid for the structure of understanding and for language in general. In _Premises_ Hamacher demonstrates that the promise of a subject position is not only unavoidable—and thus operates as a structural imperative—but is also unattainable and therefore by necessity open to possibilities other than that defined as "position," to redefinitions and unexpected transformations of (...)
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  42. William Franke (ed.) (2007). On What Cannot Be Said: Apophatic Discourses in Philosophy, Religion, Literature, and the Arts: Volume 1: Classic Formulations. University of Notre Dame Press.
    “Any writer worth his salt knows that what cannot be spoken is ultimately the thing worth speaking about; yet most often this humbling awareness is unsaid or covered up. There are some who have made it their business, however, to court failure and acknowledge defeat, to explore the impasse of words before silence. William Franke has created an anthology of such explorations, undertaken in poetry and prose, that stretches from Plato to the present. Whether the subject of discourse is All (...)
     
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  43. Genevieve Lloyd (2003). Being in Time: Selves and Narrators in Philosophy and Literature. Routledge.
    Genevieve Lloyd's book is a provocative and accessible essay on the fragmentation of the self as explored in philosophy and literature. The past is irrevocable, consciousness changes as time passes: given this, can there ever be such a thing as the unity of the self? _Being in Time_ explores the emotional aspects of the human experience of time, commonly neglected in philosophical investigation, by looking at how narrative creates and treats the experience of the self as fragmented and the (...)
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  44. Marcia Sa Cavalcante Schuback & Tora Lane (eds.) (2014). Dis-Orientations: Philosophy, Literature and the Lost Grounds of Modernity. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This is an edited collection of original essays that combine philosophy, phenomenology, and literature to reflect on modern ideas about orientation and disorientation, grounds and groundlessness.
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  45. Marcia Sa Cavalcante Schuback & Tora Lane (eds.) (2014). Dis-Orientations: Philosophy, Literature and the Lost Grounds of Modernity. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This is an edited collection of original essays that combine philosophy, phenomenology, and literature to reflect on modern ideas about orientation and disorientation, grounds and groundlessness.
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  46.  7
    Regina M. Schwartz (ed.) (2004). Transcendence: Philosophy, Literature, and Theology Approach the Beyond. Routledge.
    In Transcendence , thinkers from John Milbank, Graham Ward, and Kevin Hart, to Thomas Carlson, Slavoj Zizek, and Jean-Luc Marion have come together to create the definitive analysis of this key concept in modern theological and philosophical thought.
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  47.  10
    Mario C. Mapote (2013). Introduction to Philosophy as Foundation to Modern Education. Iamure International Journal of Literature, Philosophy and Religion 3 (1).
    Philosophy seems to be an obsolete human interest today not because it is really obsolete but because its development comes into the full and thus becomes hidden into the scene in the name of development itself. The trend of this so-called modern time is technological and practical. This is so because philosophy in the history of mankind reaches its second level i.e. the level of praxis, the practical level. Even the trend in education as well as in (...)
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  48. Régis Michaud (1934). Modern Thought and Literature in France. Funk & Wagnalls Company.
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  49.  7
    John J. Stuhr (1994). Back to the Rough Ground:_ Phronesis _and_ Techne _in Modern Philosophy and in Aristotle (Review). Philosophy and Literature 18 (2):360-361.
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  50.  26
    Kevin J. Harrelson (2013). The Ethics of History in Royce's The Spirit of Modern Philosophy. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (2):134-152.
    This essay examines the method and context that underlie Josiah Royce's The Spirit of Modern Philosophy (SMP). I locate this work among Royce's German influences, and I argue that SMP represents a considerable departure from his early Neo-Kantianism. In the concluding sections, I outline the ethical approach to historiography that Royce practices in SMP. Focusing on his polemic against Hans Vaihinger, I then draw from Royce some suggestions concerning how we should study and write the history of (...). (shrink)
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