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  1.  16
    Lloyd L. Weinreb (2000). The Right to Privacy. Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (2):25.
    The question that I address in this paper is whether there is a right to privacy. It is not the question whether in the United States there is a legal right to privacy or, more particularly, a constitutional right to privacy. There are any number of ordinary legal rights and specific constitutional rights that might be so described, and the U.S. Supreme Court has referred also to a generic “right to privacy” that is implicit in the U.S. Constitution. Nor is (...)
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  2.  2
    Lloyd L. Weinreb (1987). Natural Law and Justice. Harvard University Press.
  3.  6
    Lloyd L. Weinreb (1991). What Are Civil Rights? Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (2):1.
    For all the discussion and debate about civil rights, it is striking how little attention is given initially to the question of what civil rights are. There is no well-understood principle of inclusion or exclusion that defines the category. Nor is there an agreed list of civil rights, except perhaps a very short, avowedly nonexhaustive one, with rather imprecise entries. Yet, if the extension of the category of civil rights is uncertain, its significance is not. All agree that it is (...)
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  4. William N. Nelson & Lloyd L. Weinreb (1990). Natural Law and Justice. Philosophical Review 99 (1):144.
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  5. Lloyd L. Weinreb (2005). Legal Reason: The Use of Analogy in Legal Argument. Cambridge University Press.
    Legal Reason describes and explains the process of analogical reasoning, which is the distinctive feature of legal argument. It challenges the prevailing view, urged by Edward Levi, Cass Sunstein, Richard Posner and others, which regards analogical reasoning as logically flawed or as a defective form of deductive reasoning. It shows that analogical reasoning in the law is the same as the reasoning used by all of us routinely in everyday life and that it is a valid form of reasoning derived (...)
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  6. Lloyd L. Weinreb (2005). Legal Reason: The Use of Analogy in Legal Argument. Cambridge University Press.
    Legal Reason describes and explains the process of analogical reasoning, which is the distinctive feature of legal argument. It challenges the prevailing view, urged by Edward Levi, Cass Sunstein, Richard Posner and others, which regards analogical reasoning as logically flawed or as a defective form of deductive reasoning. It shows that analogical reasoning in the law is the same as the reasoning used by all of us routinely in everyday life and that it is a valid form of reasoning derived (...)
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  7. Lloyd L. Weinreb (1996). The Moral Point of View. In Robert P. George (ed.), The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics. Oxford University Press 195--212.
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