Search results for 'Location' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Schwenkler (2014). Vision, Self‐Location, and the Phenomenology of the 'Point of View'. Noûs 48 (1):137-155.score: 18.0
    According to the Self-Location Thesis, one’s own location can be among the things that visual experience represents, even when one’s body is entirely out of view. By contrast, the Minimal View denies this, and says that visual experience represents things only as "to the right", etc., and never as "to the right of me". But the Minimal View is phenomenologically inadequate: it cannot explain the difference between a visual experience of self-motion and one of an oppositely moving world. (...)
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  2. Antony Eagle (2010). Location and Perdurance. In Dean Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics, volume 5. Oxford Univerity Press. 53-94.score: 18.0
    Recently, Cody Gilmore has deployed an ingenious case involving backwards time travel to highlight an apparent conflict between the theory that objects persist by perduring, and the thesis that wholly coincident objects are impossible. However, careful attention to the concepts of location and parthood that Gilmore’s cases involve shows that the perdurantist faces no genuine objection from these cases, and that the perdurantist has a number of plausible and dialectically appropriate ways to avoid the supposed conflict.
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  3. Raul Saucedo (2011). Parthood and Location. In Dean Zimmerman & Karen Bennett (eds.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics Vol. 6. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    I argue that from a very weak recombination principle and plausible assumptions about the nature of parthood and location it follows that it's possible that the mereological structure of the material world and that of spacetime fail to correspond to one another in very radical ways. I defend, moreover, that rejecting the possibility of such failures of correspondence leaves us with a choice of equally radical alternatives. I also discuss a few ways in which their possibility is relevant to (...)
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  4. David Bain (2007). The Location of Pains. Philosophical Papers 36 (2):171-205.score: 18.0
    Perceptualists say that having a pain in a body part consists in perceiving the part as instantiating some property. I argue that perceptualism makes better sense of the connections between pain location and the experiences undergone by people in pain than three alternative accounts that dispense with perception. Turning to fellow perceptualists, I also reject ways in which David Armstrong and Michael Tye understand and motivate perceptualism, and I propose an alternative interpretation, one that vitiates a pair of objections—due (...)
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  5. Bill Brewer (1992). Self-Location and Agency. Mind 101 (401):17-34.score: 18.0
    We perceive things in the external world as spatially located both with respect to each other and to ourselves, such that they are in principle accessible from where we seem to be. I hear the door bang behind me; I feel the pen on the desk over to my right; and I see you walking beneath the line of pictures, from left to right in front of me. By displaying these spatial relations between its objects and us, the perceivers, perception (...)
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  6. Frank Hindriks (2013). The Location Problem in Social Ontology. Synthese 190 (3):413-437.score: 18.0
    Mental, mathematical, and moral facts are difficult to accommodate within an overall worldview due to the peculiar kinds of properties inherent to them. In this paper I argue that a significant class of social entities also presents us with an ontological puzzle that has thus far not been addressed satisfactorily. This puzzle relates to the location of certain social entities. Where, for instance, are organizations located? Where their members are, or where their designated offices are? Organizations depend on their (...)
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  7. Marjorie Spear Price (2008). Particularism and the Spatial Location of Events. Philosophia 36 (1):129-140.score: 18.0
    According to the Particularist Theory of Events, events are real things that have a spatiotemporal location. I argue that some events do not have a spatial location in the sense required by the theory. These events are ordinary, nonmental events like Smith’s investigating the murder and Carol’s putting her coat on the chair. I discuss the significance of these counterexamples for the theory.
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  8. Isabelle Ecuyer-Dab & Michèle Robert (2007). The Female Advantage in Object Location Memory According to the Foraging Hypothesis: A Critical Analysis. [REVIEW] Human Nature 18 (4):365-385.score: 18.0
    According to the evolutionary hypothesis of Silverman and Eals (1992, Sex differences in spatial abilities: Evolutionary theory and data. In J. H. Barkow, L. Cosmides, & J. Tooby (Eds.), The adapted mind: Evolutionary psychology and the generation of culture (pp. 533–549). Oxford: Oxford University Press), women evolutionary hypothesis, women surpass men in object location memory as a result of a sexual division in foraging activities among early humans. After surveying the main anthropological information on ancestral sex-related foraging, we review (...)
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  9. Peter J. Lewis (2010). Credence and Self-Location. Synthese 175 (3):369-382.score: 15.0
    All parties to the Sleeping Beauty debate agree that it shows that some cherished principle of rationality has to go. Thirders think that it is Conditionalization and Reflection that must be given up or modified; halfers think that it is the Principal Principle. I offer an analysis of the Sleeping Beauty puzzle that allows us to retain all three principles. In brief, I argue that Sleeping Beauty’s credence in the uncentered proposition that the coin came up heads should be 1/2, (...)
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  10. Daniel M. Taylor (1965). The Location of Pain. Philosophical Quarterly 15 (January):53-62.score: 15.0
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  11. John Campbell (2006). What is the Role of Location in the Sense of a Visual Demonstrative? Reply to Matthen. Philosophical Studies 127 (2):239-254.score: 15.0
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  12. Brian O'Shaughnessy (1957). The Location of Sound. Mind 66 (October):471-490.score: 15.0
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  13. L. C. Holborow (1966). Taylor on Pain Location. Philosophical Quarterly 16 (April):151-158.score: 15.0
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  14. David Gordon (1984). Special Relativity and the Location of Mental Events. Analysis 44 (June):126-127.score: 15.0
  15. Michael Tye (2002). On the Location of a Pain. Analysis 62 (2):150-153.score: 15.0
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  16. Daniel M. Taylor (1966). The Location of Pain: A Reply to Mr Holborow. Philosophical Quarterly 16 (October):359-360.score: 15.0
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  17. Joseph Margolis (1966). Awareness of Sensations and of the Location of Sensations. Analysis 26 (October):29-32.score: 15.0
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  18. Godfrey N. A. Vesey (1961). The Location of Bodily Sensations. Mind 70 (January):25-35.score: 15.0
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  19. Yanna Vogiazou (2007). Design for Emergence: Collaborative Social Play with Online and Location-Based Media. Ios Press.score: 15.0
    In light of the fact that social dynamics and unexpected uses of technology can inspire innovation, this book proposes a research model of design for emergence, ...
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  20. Nathaniel M. Lawrence (1953). Single Location, Simple Location and Misplaced Concreteness. Review of Metaphysics 7 (December):225-247.score: 15.0
  21. Stefan Schulz, Philipp Daumke, Barry Smith & Udo Hahn (2005). How to Distinguish Parthood From Location in Bioontologies. In Proceedings of the AMIA Symposium. American Medical Informatics Association.score: 15.0
    The pivotal role of the relation part-of in the description of living organisms is widely acknowledged. Organisms are open systems, which means that in contradistinction to mechanical artifacts they are characterized by a continuous flow and exchange of matter. A closer analysis of the spatial relations in biological organisms reveals that the decision as to whether a given particular is part-of a second particular or whether it is only contained-in the second particular is often controversial. We here propose a rule-based (...)
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  22. Charles W. Eriksen (1953). Object Location in a Complex Perceptual Field. Journal of Experimental Psychology 45 (2):126.score: 15.0
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  23. Hugh C. Blodgett, Kenneth McCutchan & Ravenna Mathews (1949). Spatial Learning in the T-Maze: The Influence of Direction, Turn, and Food Location. Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (6):800.score: 15.0
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  24. Charles W. Eriksen (1952). Location of Objects in a Visual Display as a Function of the Number of Dimensions on Which the Objects Differ. Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (1):56.score: 15.0
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  25. Ronald L. Ernst, Charles P. Thompson & W. J. Brogden (1962). Effect of Pattern and Pleonasm Location in Serial Lists Upon Acquisition and Serial Position Errors. Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (2):151.score: 15.0
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  26. Ronald L. Ernest, Donald R. Hoffeld, Sidney Seidenstein & W. J. Brogden (1960). Relation of Serial Position Errors to Doublet and Split-Doublet Location in Verbal Maze Pattern. Journal of Experimental Psychology 59 (2):94.score: 15.0
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  27. D. M. Forsyth & A. Chapanis (1958). Counting Repeated Light Flashes as a Function of Their Number, Their Rate of Presentation, and Retinal Location Stimulated. Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (5):385.score: 15.0
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  28. Richard T. Heine, R. Terry Pivik & Charles P. Thompson (1966). Magnitude of the Doublet Effect as a Function of Location in a Verbal Maze. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (6):912.score: 15.0
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  29. Harry W. Karn & Lee W. Gregg (1961). Acquisition of Perceptual Responses as a Function of Loading, Location, and Repetition. Journal of Experimental Psychology 62 (1):62.score: 15.0
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  30. Howard H. Kendler & Helen Chamberlain Mencher (1948). The Ability of Rats to Learn the Location of Food When Motivated by Thirst--An Experimental Reply to Leeper. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (1):82-88.score: 15.0
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  31. Michael Lockwood (1984). Reply to David Gordon's Special Relativity and the Location of Mental Events. Analysis 44 (June):127-128.score: 15.0
     
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  32. Gediminas Namikas, Charles P. Thompson & W. J. Brogden (1960). Effect of Triplet and Quadruplicate Location in Verbal Maze Patterns Upon Serial Position Errors. Journal of Experimental Psychology 59 (6):383.score: 15.0
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  33. Nick Neave, Colin Hamilton, Lee Hutton, Nicola Tildesley & Anne T. Pickering (2005). Some Evidence of a Female Advantage in Object Location Memory Using Ecologically Valid Stimuli. Human Nature 16 (2):146-163.score: 15.0
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  34. Douglas L. Nelson (1968). Paired-Associate Acquisition as a Function of Association Value, Degree, and Location of Similarity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (3p1):364.score: 15.0
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  35. J. Richard Simon, James V. Hinrichs & John L. Craft (1970). Auditory S-R Compatibility: Reaction Time as a Function of Ear-Hand Correspondence and Ear-Response-Location Correspondence. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (1):97.score: 15.0
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  36. J. Tiffin & F. L. Westhafer (1940). The Relation Between Reaction Time and Temporal Location of the Stimulus on the Tremor Cycle. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (3):318.score: 15.0
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  37. Benjamin Wallace & Scott P. Anstadt (1974). Target Location Aftereffects for Various Age Groups. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (1):175.score: 15.0
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  38. Nick Bostrom (2007). Sleeping Beauty and Self-Location: A Hybrid Model. Synthese 157 (1):59 - 78.score: 14.0
    The Sleeping Beauty problem is test stone for theories about self- locating belief, i.e. theories about how we should reason when data or theories contain indexical information. Opinion on this problem is split between two camps, those who defend the “1/2 view” and those who advocate the “1/3 view”. I argue that both these positions are mistaken. Instead, I propose a new “hybrid” model, which avoids the faults of the standard views while retaining their attractive properties. This model appears to (...)
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  39. Susanna Schellenberg (2007). Action and Self-Location in Perception. Mind 115 (463):603-632.score: 12.0
    I offer an explanation of how subjects are able to perceive the intrinsic spatial properties of objects, given that subjects always perceive from a particular location. The argument proceeds in two steps. First, I argue that a conception of space is necessary to perceive the intrinsic spatial properties of objects. This conception of space is spelled out by showing that perceiving intrinsic properties requires perceiving objects as the kind of things that are perceivable from other locations. Second, I show (...)
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  40. Josh Parsons (2008). Hudson on Location. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (2):427 - 435.score: 12.0
    Paper begins: Chapter 4 of Hud Hudson’s stimulating book The metaphysics of hyperspace contains an discussion of the notion of location in a container spacetime. Hudson uses this idea to define a number of what we might call modes of extension or ways of being extended. A pertended object is what most people think of as a typical extended object — it is made up of spatial parts, one part for each region the object pervades. An entended object is (...)
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  41. Robin Jeshion (2006). The Identity of Indiscernibles and the Co-Location Problem. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (2):163–176.score: 12.0
    The Identity of Indiscernibles is the principle that there cannot be two individual things in nature that are qualitatively identical. The principle is not exactly popular. Michael Della Rocca tries to resurrect it by arguing that we must accept this principle, for otherwise we cannot explain the impossibility of completely overlapping indiscernible objects of the same kind that share all their parts and exist in the same place at the same time. I try to show that his argument goes wrong: (...)
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  42. Ignacio Ávila (2012). Evans on Bodily Awareness and Perceptual Self‐Location. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):n/a-n/a.score: 12.0
    In Chapter 7 of The Varieties of ReferenceEvans implicitly outlines a view to the effect that bodily awareness plays no role in perceptual self-location or in the specification of our perceptual perspective of the world. In this paper I discuss this story and offer an alternative proposal. Then I explore some consequences of this account for our understanding of the elusiveness of the self in perceptual experience.
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  43. Gloria Ayob (2008). Space and Sense: The Role of Location in Understanding Demonstrative Concepts. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 108 (1pt3):347-354.score: 12.0
    My aim in this paper is to critically evaluate John Campbell's (2002) characterization of the sense of demonstrative terms and his account of why an object's location matters in our understanding of perceptually-based demonstrative terms. Campbell thinks that the senses of a demonstrative term are the different ways of consciously attending to an object. I will evaluate Campbell's account of sense by exploring and comparing two scenarios in which the actual location of a seen object is different from (...)
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  44. Kris McDaniel (2003). No Paradox of Multi-Location. Analysis 63 (4):309–311.score: 12.0
    In a recent paper, Stephen Barker and Phil Dowe (2003)1 argue that multilocation is impossible. An object enjoys multi-location just in case it is wholly present at more than one (distinct) space-time region (106). One popular view that is committed to multi-located objects is endurantism, the doctrine that objects persist through time by being wholly present at each time they are located.2 So if Barker and Dowe are right, endurantism is in big trouble.
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  45. James Williams (2009). If Not Here, Then Where? On the Location and Individuation of Events in Badiou and Deleuze. Deleuze Studies 3 (1):97-123.score: 12.0
    This paper sets out a series of critical contrasts between Alain Badiou and Gilles Deleuze's philosophies of the event. It does so in the context of some likely objections to their positions from a broadly analytic position. These objections concern problems of individuation and location in space-time. The paper also explains Deleuze and Badiou's views on the event through a literary application on a short story by John Cheever. In conclusion it is argued that both thinkers have good answers (...)
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  46. Ian Gold (2001). Spatial Location in Color Vision. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (1):59-62.score: 12.0
    Ross argues that the location problem for color-the problem of how it is represented as occupying a particular location in space-constitutes an objection to color subjectivism. There are two ways in which the location problem can be interpreted. First, it can be read as a why-question about the relation of visual experience to the environment represented: Why does visual experience represent a patch of color as located in this part of space rather than that? On this interpretation, (...)
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  47. Peter Simons (2006). The Logic of Location. Synthese 150 (3):443 - 458.score: 12.0
    I consider the idea of a propositional logic of location based on the following semantic framework, derived from ideas of Prior. We have a collection L of locations and a collection S of statements such that a statement may be evaluated for truth at each location. Typically one and the same statement may be true at one location and false at another. Given this semantic framework we may proceed in two ways: introducing names for locations, predicates for (...)
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  48. Achille Varzi (2006). Event Location and Vagueness. Philosophical Studies 128 (2):313 - 336.score: 12.0
    Most event-referring expressions are vague: it is utterly difficult, if not impossible, to specify the exact spatiotemporal location of an event from the words that we use to refer to it. We argue that in spite of certain prima facie obstacles, such vagueness can be given a purely semantic (broadly supervaluational) account.
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  49. Jonathan Cohen (2001). Subjectivism, Physicalism or None of the Above? Comments on Ross's The Location Problem for Color Subjectivism. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (1):94-104.score: 12.0
    In “The Location Problem for Color Subjectivism,” Peter Ross argues against what he calls subjectivism — the view that “colors are not describable in physical terms, ... [but are] mental processes or events of visual states” (2),1 and in favor of physicalism — a view according to which colors are “physical properties of physical objects, such as reflectance properties” (10). He rejects an argument that has been offered in support of subjectivism, and argues that, since no form of subjectivism (...)
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  50. Sam Cowling (2014). Instantiation as Location. Philosophical Studies 167 (3):667-682.score: 12.0
    Many familiar forms of property realism identify properties with sui generis ontological categories like universals or tropes and posit a fundamental instantiation relation that unifies objects with their properties. In this paper, I develop and defend locationism, which identifies properties with locations and holds that the occupation relation that unifies objects with their locations also unifies objects with their properties. Along with the theoretical parsimony that locationism enjoys, I argue that locationism resolves a puzzle for actualists regarding the ontological status (...)
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