Search results for 'Lockeanism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Scott Campbell (2001). Neo-Lockeanism and Circularity. Philosophia 28 (1-4):477-489.score: 15.0
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  2. David Mackie (1999). Animalism Versus Lockeanism: No Contest. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (196):369-376.score: 12.0
    In ‘Animalism versus Lockeanism: a Current Controversy’, The Philosophical Quarterly, 48 (1998), pp. 302–18, Harold Noonan examined the relation between animalist and neo‐Lockean theories of personal identity. As well as presenting arguments intended to support a modest compatibilism of animalism and neo‐Lockeanism, he advanced a new proposal about the relation between persons and human beings which was intended to evade the principal animalist objections to neo‐Lockean theories. I argue both that the arguments for compatibilism are without force, and (...)
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  3. Harold W. Noonan (1998). Animalism Versus Lockeanism: A Current Controversy. Philosophical Quarterly 48 (192):302-318.score: 9.0
  4. Harold W. Noonan (2001). Animalism Versus Lockeanism: Reply to Mackie. Philosophical Quarterly 51 (202):83-90.score: 9.0
  5. Patricia Sheridan (2007). Reflection, Nature, and Moral Law: The Extent of Catharine Cockburn's Lockeanism in Her. Hypatia 22 (3).score: 9.0
    : This essay examines Catharine Cockburn's moral philosophy as it is developed in her Defence of Mr. Locke's Essay on Human Understanding. In this work, Cockburn argues that Locke's epistemological principles provide a foundation for the knowledge of natural law. Sheridan suggests that Cockburn's objective in defending Locke's moral epistemology was conditioned by her own prior commitment to a significantly un-Lockean theory of morality. In exploring Cockburn's views on morality in terms of their divergence from Locke's, the author hopes to (...)
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  6. Patricia Sheridan (2007). Reflection, Nature, and Moral Law: The Extent of Catharine Cockburn's Lockeanism in Her Defence of Mr. Locke's Essay. Hypatia 22 (3):133 - 151.score: 9.0
    This essay examines Catharine Cockburn's moral philosophy as it is developed in her Defence of Mr. Locke's Essay on Human Understanding. In this work, Cockburn argues that Locke's epistemological principles provide a foundation for the knowledge of natural law. Sheridan suggests that Cockburn's objective in defending Locke's moral epistemology was conditioned by her own prior commitment to a significantly un-Lockean theory of morality. In exploring Cockbum's views on morality in terms of their divergence from Locke's, the author hopes to underscore (...)
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  7. Grant Gillett (forthcoming). Neuroethics, Neo-Lockeanism, and Embodied Subjectivity. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (1):43-46.score: 9.0
  8. Eric Mack (1983). Distributive Justice and the Tensions of Lockeanism. Social Philosophy and Policy 1 (01):132-.score: 9.0
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  9. John E. Roemer (1988). A Challenge to Neo-Lockeanism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 18 (4):697 - 710.score: 9.0
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  10. Steinvör Thöll Árnadóttir (2010). Functionalism and Thinking Animals. Philosophical Studies 147 (3):347 - 354.score: 6.0
    Lockean accounts of personal identity face a problem of too many thinkers arising from their denial that we are identical to our animals and the assumption that our animals can think. Sydney Shoemaker has responded to this problem by arguing that it is a consequence of functionalism that only things with psychological persistence conditions can have mental properties, and thus that animals cannot think. I discuss Shoemaker’s argument and demonstrate two ways in which it fails. Functionalism does not rid the (...)
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  11. Dave Ward (2011). Personal Identity, Agency and the Multiplicity Thesis. Minds and Machines 21 (4):497-515.score: 6.0
    I consider whether there is a plausible conception of personal identity that can accommodate the ‘Multiplicity Thesis’ (MT), the thesis that some ways of creating and deploying multiple distinct online personae can bring about the existence of multiple persons where before there was only one. I argue that an influential Kantian line of thought, according to which a person is a unified locus of rational agency, is well placed to accommodate the thesis. I set out such a line of thought (...)
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  12. Richard J. Arneson, Consent.score: 3.0
    The Lockean natural rights tradition—including its libertarian branch-- is a work in progress.1 Thirty years after the publication of Anarchy, State, and Utopia, Robert Nozick’s classic work of political theory is still regarded by academic philosophers as the authoritative statement of right-wing libertarian Lockeanism in the Ayn Rand mold.2 Despite the classic status of this great book, its tone is not at all magisterial, but improvisational, quirky, tentative, and exploratory. Its author has more questions than answers. On some central (...)
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  13. Chris Daly & David Liggins (2013). Animalism and Deferentialism. Dialectica 67 (4):605-609.score: 3.0
    Animalism is the theory that we are animals: in other words, that each of us is numerically identical to an animal. An alternative theory maintains that we are not animals but that each of us is constituted by an animal. Call this alternative theory neo-Lockean constitutionalism or Lockeanism for short. Stephan Blatti (2012) offers to advance the debate between animalism and Lockeanism by providing a new argument for animalism. In this note, we present our own objection to Blatti's (...)
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  14. Dmitri Levitin (2010). Reconsidering John Sergeant's Attacks on Locke's Essay. Intellectual History Review 20 (4):457-477.score: 3.0
    The Catholic polemicist John Sergeant published three major works of philosophy towards the end of his literary career, The Method to Science (1696), Solid Philosophy (1697) and Metaphysics (1700). They were highly critical of what Sergeant saw as the idea-grounded epistemology of the Cartesians and John Locke, whom he labelled 'ideists'. Previous scholars have interpreted Sergeant's texts as manifestations of his lifelong obsession with certainty, as initially developed in his Restoration polemics against Anglican divines. Using a previously neglected autobiographical letter, (...)
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  15. David Mackie (1999). Animalism Vs. Lockeanism 49:369-76.score: 3.0
     
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