Search results for 'Logic, Medieval' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Eleonore Stump (1989). Dialectic and its Place in the Development of Medieval Logic. Cornell University Press.score: 156.0
    Introduction Since my work in medieval logic has concentrated on dialectic. I have tried to trace scholastic treatments of dialectic to discussions of it in ...
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  2. Alexander Broadie (1993). Introduction to Medieval Logic. Oxford University Press.score: 156.0
    Medieval logicians advanced far beyond the logic of Aristotle, and this book shows how far that advance took them in two central areas. Broadie focuses upon the work of some of the great figures of the fourteenth century, including Walter Burley, William Ockham, John Buridan, Albert of Saxony, and Paul of Venice, and deals with their theories of truth conditions and validity conditions. He reveals how much of what seems characteristically twentieth-century logic was familiar long ago. Broadie has extensively (...)
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  3. John Marenbon (ed.) (2007). The Many Roots of Medieval Logic: The Aristotelian and the Non-Aristotelian Traditions: Special Offprint of Vivarium 45, 2-3 (2007). [REVIEW] Brill.score: 156.0
    The specialized essays in this collection study whether non-Aristotelian traditions of ancient logic had a role for medieval logicians. Special attention is given to Stoic logic and semantics, and to Neoplatonism.
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  4. Sara L. Uckelman (2012). Arthur Prior and Medieval Logic. Synthese 188 (3):349-366.score: 144.0
    Though Arthur Prior is now best known for his founding of modern temporal logic and hybrid logic, much of his early philosophical career was devoted to history of logic and historical logic. This interest laid the foundations for both of his ground-breaking innovations in the 1950s and 1960s. Because of the important rôle played by Prior's research in ancient and medieval logic in his development of temporal and hybrid logic, any student of Prior, temporal logic, or hybrid logic should (...)
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  5. Ernest A. Moody (1975). Studies in Medieval Philosophy, Science, and Logic: Collected Papers, 1933-1969. University of California Press.score: 132.0
    William of Auvergne and His Treatise De Anima I. Introduction William of Auvergne, Bishop of Paris from until his death in, is of interest to us chiefly ...
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  6. E. J. Ashworth (1978). The Tradition of Medieval Logic and Speculative Grammar From Anselm to the End of the Seventeenth Century: A Bibliography From 1836 Onwards. Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.score: 132.0
  7. Philotheus Boehner (1952/1979). Medieval Logic: An Outline of its Development From 1250 to C.1400. Hyperion Press.score: 132.0
     
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  8. Desmond Paul Henry (1972). Medieval Logic and Metaphysics: A Modern Introduction. London,Hutchinson.score: 132.0
     
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  9. P. Osmund Lewry (ed.) (1983). The Rise of British Logic: Acts of the Sixth European Symposium on Medieval Logic and Semantics, Balliol College, Oxford, 19-24 June 1983. [REVIEW] Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.score: 132.0
  10. Alfonso Maierù & Luisa Valente (eds.) (2004). Medieval Theories on Assertive and Non-Assertive Language: Acts of the 14th European Symposium on Medieval Logic and Semantics, Rome, June 11-15, 2002. [REVIEW] L.S. Olschki.score: 132.0
  11. Jan Pinborg (1984). Medieval Semantics: Selected Studies on Medieval Logic and Grammar. Variorum Reprints.score: 132.0
  12. Jan Pinborg (ed.) (1976). The Logic of John Buridan: Acts of the 3rd European Symposium on Medieval Logic and Semantics, Copenhagen 16.-21. November 1975. [REVIEW] [Institut for Klassisk Filologi].score: 132.0
  13. Tetsurō Shimizu & Charles Burnett (eds.) (2009). The Word in Medieval Logic, Theology and Psychology: Acts of the Xiiith International Colloquium of the Société Internationale Pour l'Étude de la Philosophie Médiévale, Kyoto, 27 September-1 October 2005. [REVIEW] Brepols.score: 132.0
  14. Paloma Pérez-Ilzarbe (2011). Disputation and Logic in the Medieval Treatises De Modo Opponendi Et Respondendi. Vivarium 49 (1-3):127-149.score: 126.0
    In 1980 L. M. de Rijk edited some texts connected with medieval disputation ( Die mittelaterlichen Traktate De modo opponendi et respondendi ), towards which he showed a strikingly contemptuous attitude. The reason for his contempt was that the treatises did not fit the obligationes and sophismata tradition. In this article I focus on the original version, the Thesaurus Philosophorum , to highlight the distinction of this family of treatises with respect to the “modern“ tradition. First, I study the (...)
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  15. Deborah L. Black (1990). Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Medieval Arabic Philosophy. E.J. Brill.score: 120.0
  16. Heikki Kirjavainen (ed.) (1986). Faith, Will, and Grammar: Some Themes of Intentional Logic and Semantics in Medieval and Reformation Thought. Luther-Agricola Society.score: 120.0
     
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  17. Robert C. Trundle (1999). Medieval Modal Logic & Science: Augustine on Necessary Truth & Thomas on its Impossibility Without a First Cause. University Press of America.score: 120.0
  18. Ernest A. Moody (1976). Truth and Consequence in Mediaeval Logic. Greenwood Press.score: 114.0
  19. Ivan Boh (1993). Epistemic Logic in the Later Middle Ages. Routledge.score: 102.0
    Epistemic logic is one of the most exciting areas in medieval philosophy. Neglected almost entirely after the end of the Middle Ages, it has been rediscovered by philosophers of the twentieth century. Epistemic Logic in the Later Middle Ages provides the first comprehensive study of the subject. Ivan Boh explores the contrast between epistemic and alethic conceptions of consequence, the general epistemic rules of consequence, the search for conditions of knowing contingent propositions, the problems of substitutivity in intentional contexts, (...)
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  20. Norman Kretzmann & Eleonore Stump (eds.) (1988). Logic and the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.score: 102.0
    This is the first of a three-volume anthology intended as a companion to The Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy. Volume 1 is concerned with the logic and the philosophy of language, and comprises fifteen important texts on questions of meaning and inference that formed the basis of Medieval philosophy. As far as is practicable, complete works or topically complete segments of larger works have been selected. The editors have provided a full introduction to the volume and detailed (...)
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  21. John Marenbon (1981/2006). From the Circle of Alcuin to the School of Auxerre: Logic, Theology, and Philosophy in the Early Middle Ages. New Yorkcambridge University Press.score: 102.0
    This study is the first modern account of the development of philosophy during the Carolingian Renaissance. In the late eighth century, Dr Marenbon argues, theologians were led by their enthusiasm for logic to pose themselves truly philosophical questions. The central themes of ninth-century philosophy - essence, the Aristotelian Categories, the problem of Universals - were to preoccupy thinkers throughout the Middle Ages. The earliest period of medieval philosophy was thus a formative one. This work is based on a fresh (...)
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  22. Margaret Cameron & John Marenbon (eds.) (2011). Methods and Methodologies: Aristotelian Logic East and West, 500-1500. Brill.score: 102.0
    This book examines the medieval tradition of Aristotelian logic from two perspectives.
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  23. Charles H. Manekin (1996). Some Aspects of the Assertoric Syllogism in Medieval Hebrew Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 17 (1-2):49-71.score: 102.0
    This paper introduces the reader to the medieval Hebrew tradition of logic by considering its treatment of Aristotelian syllogistic. Starting in the thirteenth century European Jews translated Arabic and Latin texts into Hebrew and produced commentaries and original compendia.Because they stood culturally and geographically at the cross-roads of two great traditions they were influenced by both.This is clearly seen in the development of syllogistic theory, where the Latin tradition ultimately replaces, though never entirely, its Arabic counterpart.Specific attention is devoted (...)
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  24. Heine Hansen, Jakob Leth Fink & Ana María Mora-Márquez (2012). Logic and Language in the Middle Ages. Brill.score: 102.0
    Collection of articles on medieval logic and semantics. Introduction by Sten Ebbesen and 24 contributions by scholars in the history of medieval theories of language. The papers in this volume treat several aspects of the history of theories of language from the 12th to the 14th century, aspects that have in a way or another been dealt with by Ebbesen himself.Festschrift in honor of Sten Ebessen in the occasion of his 65th birthday.
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  25. Raul Corazzon, History of Medieval Logic: A General Overview.score: 96.0
    "The role of logic in the Middle Ages. Regarding the role of logic within the framework of arts and sciences during the Middle Ages, we have to distinguish two related aspects, one institutional and the other scientific. As to the first aspect, we have to remember that the medieval educational system was based on the seven liberal arts, which were divided into the trivium, i.e., three arts of language, and the quadrivium, i.e., four mathematical arts. The so-called trivial arts (...)
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  26. Catarina Dutilh Novaes (2006). Formalizations Après la Lettre : Studies in Medieval Logic and Semantics. Dissertation, Leiden Universityscore: 96.0
    This thesis is on the history and philosophy of logic and semantics. Logic can be described as the ‘science of reasoning’, as it deals primarily with correct patterns of reasoning. However, logic as a discipline has undergone dramatic changes in the last two centuries: while for ancient and medieval philosophers it belonged essentially to the realm of language studies, it has currently become a sub-branch of mathematics. This thesis attempts to establish a dialogue between the modern and the (...) traditions in logic, by means of ‘translations’ of the medieval logical theories into the modern framework of symbolic logic, i.e. formalizations. One of its conclusions is that, when properly understood within their own framework, the interest of medieval logical theories for modern investigations go beyond mere historical interest, but that a thorough conceptual analysis of such theories must be undertaken in order to avoid conceptual misprojections. While such translations of medieval into modern logic have been attempted before, the approach presented here is innovative in that attention is paid to the similarities as well as to the dissimilarities between the two traditions, and to what can be learned from the medieval masters for modern investigations in logic and semantics. (shrink)
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  27. Terence Parsons (2014). Articulating Medieval Logic. Oup Oxford.score: 96.0
    Terence Parsons presents a new study of the development and continuing value of medieval logic, which expanded Aristotle's basic principles of logic in important ways. Parsons argues that the resulting system is as rich as contemporary first-order symbolic logic.
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  28. Nielsj�Rgen Green-Pedersen (1987). The Topics in Medieval Logic. Argumentation 1 (4):407-417.score: 96.0
    The topics is a theory of argumentation based upon topoi or in Latin loci. The medieval logicians used works by Aristotle and Boethius as their sources for this doctrine, but they developed it in a rather original way. The topics became a higher-level analysis of arguments which are non-valid from a purely formal point of view, but where it is none the less legitimate to infer the conclusion from the premiss(es). In this connection the topics give rise to a (...)
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  29. E. J. Ashworth (1974). Language and Logic in the Post-Medieval Period. Reidel.score: 90.0
    HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION Although many of the details of the development of logic in the Middle Ages remain to be filled in, it is well known that between ...
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  30. Philotheus Boehner (1952). Medieval Logic. [Manchester, Eng.]Manchester University Press.score: 90.0
    PART ONE ELEMENTS OF SCHOLASTIC LOGIC I THE LEGACY OF SCHOLASTIC LOGIC "\ T 7E MAY safely describe the initial scholastic contri- VV bution to logical ...
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  31. Karl Dürr (1951/1980). The Propositional Logic of Boethius. Greenwood Press.score: 90.0
    The text of the treatise “The Propositional Logic of Boethius” was finished in 1939. Prof. Jan Lukasiewicz wished at that time to issue it in the second volume of “Collectanea Logica”; as a result of political events, he was not able to carry out his plan. In 1938, I published an article in “Erkenntnis” entitled “AUS- sagenlogik im Mittelalter”; this article included the contents of a paper which I read to the International Congress for the Unity of Science in Cambridge, (...)
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  32. Mark D. Johnston (1987). The Spiritual Logic of Ramon Llull. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    This book presents a comprehensive critical survey of all the logical doctrines of the well-known but little understood Catalan philosopher and theologian, Ramon Llull (1232-1316). The highly idiosyncratic character of Llull's writings has long frustrated the efforts of general medieval historians to define his contribution to later scholastic culture, and has resisted attempts by specialists to explain exactly how his methods and procedures worked. This new study--the first book-length treatment in English of Llull's philosophy to appear in over fifty (...)
     
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  33. Shahid Rahman, Tero Tulenheimo & Emmanuel Genot (eds.) (2008). Unity, Truth and the Liar: The Modern Relevance of Medieval Solutions to the Liar Paradox. Springer.score: 84.0
    This volume includes a target paper, taking up the challenge to revive, within a modern (formal) framework, a medieval solution to the Liar Paradox which did ...
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  34. Giorgio Pini (2002). Categories and Logic in Duns Scotus: An Interpretation of Aristotle's Categories in the Late Thirteenth Century. Brill.score: 84.0
    This study of the interpretations of Aristotle's "Categories" in the thirteenth century provides an introduction to some main themes of medieval philosophical ...
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  35. Anthony Bonner (2007). The Art and Logic of Ramon Llull: A User's Guide. Brill.score: 84.0
    The quaternary phase -- Changes in the art during the quaternary phase, and the transition to the ternary phase -- The ternary phase -- The post-art phase : logic -- Overview.
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  36. Paul Thom (2007). Logic and Ontology in the Syllogistic of Robert Kilwardby. Brill.score: 84.0
    The first full-length study of Robert Kilwardby's commentary on Aristotle's Prior Analytics, based on a study of the medieval manuscripts.
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  37. Richard Kilvington (1990). The Sophismata of Richard Kilvington: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary. Cambridge University Press.score: 84.0
    Richard Kilvington was an obscure fourteenth-century philosopher whose Sophismata deal with a series of logic-linguistic conundrums of a sort which featured extensively in philosophical discussions of this period. This is the first ever translation or edition of his work. As well as an introduction to Kilvington's work, the editors provide a detailed commentary. This edition will prove of considerable interest to historians of medieval philosophy who will realise from the evidence presented here that Kilvington deserves to be studied just (...)
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  38. John Marenbon (2000). Aristotelian Logic, Platonism, and the Context of Early Medieval Philosophy in the West. Ashgate/Variorum.score: 84.0
  39. Henry Chadwick (1981). Boethius, the Consolations of Music, Logic, Theology, and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 84.0
    The Consolations of Philosophy by Boethius, whose English translators include King Alfred, Geoffrey Chaucer, and Queen Elizabeth I, ranks among the most remarkable books to be written by a prisoner awaiting the execution of a tyrannical death sentence. Its interpretation is bound up with his other writings on mathematics and music, on Aristotelian and propositional logic, and on central themes of Christian dogma. -/- Chadwick begins by tracing the career of Boethius, a Roman rising to high office under the Gothic (...)
     
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  40. Curtis Wilson (1956). William Heytesbury: Medieval Logic and the Rise of Mathematical Physics. University of Wisconsin Press.score: 84.0
     
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  41. Desmond Paul Henry (1991). Medieval Mereology. B.R. Grüner.score: 78.0
    0. Introduction: Mereology, Metaphysics, and Speculative Grammar 0.1 Mereology, Ancient and Contemporary 0.11 Mereology is, strictly speaking, the theory of ...
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  42. Gyula Klima, Existence and Reference in Medieval Logic.score: 78.0
    “The expression ‘free logic’ is an abbreviation for the phrase ‘free of existence assumptions with respect to its terms, general and singular’.”1 Classical quantification theory is not a free logic in this sense, as its standard formulations commonly assume that every singular term in every model is assigned a referent, an element of the universe of discourse. Indeed, since singular terms include not only singular constants, but also variables2, standard quantification theory may be regarded as involving even the assumption of (...)
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  43. P. T. Geach (1980). Reference and Generality: An Examination of Some Medieval and Modern Theories. Cornell University Press.score: 78.0
  44. Andreas Blank (2014). Later Medieval Metaphysics. Ontology, Language & Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 35 (2):211-213.score: 78.0
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  45. Jorge J. E. Gracia (1975). Propositions as Premises of Syllogisms in Medieval Logic. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 16 (4):545-547.score: 78.0
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  46. Tuomo Aho & Mikko Yrjönsuuri (2009). Late Medieval Logic. In Leila Haaparanta (ed.), The Development of Modern Logic. Oxford University Press. 11.score: 78.0
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  47. Robert William Schmidt (1966). The Domain of Logic According to Saint Thomas Aquinas. The Haguemartinus Nijhoff.score: 78.0
  48. Nicholas Rescher (1964). Studies in the History of Arabic Logic. [Pittsburgh]University of Pittsburgh Press.score: 78.0
  49. Emily Michael (1979). Some Considerations in Medieval Tense Logic. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 20 (4):794-800.score: 78.0
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  50. Norman Kretzmann (1990). Review: Alexander Broadie, Introduction to Medieval Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 55 (3):1320-1322.score: 78.0
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