Search results for 'Logic, Medieval History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Satis Chandra Vidyabhusana (1921/1971). A History of Indian Logic: Ancient, Mediaeval, and Modern Schools. Delhi,Motilal Banarsidass.
    The Conciliatory Character of Jaina Logic. In the previous pages there has been given an indication of the services rendered by the Jainas and N° Brihrna^1 H,e the Buddhists in the formation of the Mediaeval School of Indian Logic. Since the  ...
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  2.  33
    Raul Corazzon, History of Medieval Logic: A General Overview.
    "The role of logic in the Middle Ages. Regarding the role of logic within the framework of arts and sciences during the Middle Ages, we have to distinguish two related aspects, one institutional and the other scientific. As to the first aspect, we have to remember that the medieval educational system was based on the seven liberal arts, which were divided into the trivium, i.e., three arts of language, and the quadrivium, i.e., four mathematical arts. The so-called trivial arts (...)
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  3. Satis Chandra Vidyabhusana (1909/1977). History of the Mediaeval School of Indian Logic. Exclusively Distributed by Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.
     
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  4. Robert C. Trundle (1999). Medieval Modal Logic & Science: Augustine on Necessary Truth & Thomas on its Impossibility Without a First Cause. University Press of America.
    Medieval Modal Logic & Science uses modal reasoning in a new way to fortify the relationships between science, ethics, and politics. Robert C. Trundle accomplishes this by analyzing the role of modal logic in the work of St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas, then applying these themes to contemporary issues. He incorporates Augustine's ideas involving thought and consciousness, and Aquinas's reasoning to a First Cause. The author also deals with Augustine's ties to Aristotelian modalities of thought regarding science and (...)
     
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  5. Tetsurō Shimizu & Charles Burnett (eds.) (2009). The Word in Medieval Logic, Theology and Psychology: Acts of the Xiiith International Colloquium of the Société Internationale Pour l'Étude de la Philosophie Médiévale, Kyoto, 27 September-1 October 2005. [REVIEW] Brepols.
  6.  69
    Dov M. Gabbay, John Woods & Akihiro Kanamori (eds.) (2004). Handbook of the History of Logic. Elsevier.
    Greek, Indian and Arabic Logic marks the initial appearance of the multi-volume Handbook of the History of Logic. Additional volumes will be published when ready, rather than in strict chronological order. Soon to appear are The Rise of Modern Logic: From Leibniz to Frege. Also in preparation are Logic From Russell to Gödel, The Emergence of Classical Logic, Logic and the Modalities in the Twentieth Century, and The Many-Valued and Non-Monotonic Turn in Logic. Further volumes will follow, including Mediaeval (...)
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  7. Robert Pasnau & Christina Van Dyke (eds.) (2010). The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy comprises over fifty specially commissioned essays by experts on the philosophy of this period. Starting in the late eighth century, with the renewal of learning some centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, a sequence of chapters takes the reader through developments in many and varied fields, including logic and language, natural philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, and theology. Close attention is paid to the context of medieval philosophy, with discussions of the (...)
     
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  8. Deborah L. Black (1990). Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Medieval Arabic Philosophy. E.J. Brill.
  9. Heikki Kirjavainen (ed.) (1986). Faith, Will, and Grammar: Some Themes of Intentional Logic and Semantics in Medieval and Reformation Thought. Luther-Agricola Society.
     
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  10.  19
    Sara L. Uckelman (2012). Arthur Prior and Medieval Logic. Synthese 188 (3):349-366.
    Though Arthur Prior is now best known for his founding of modern temporal logic and hybrid logic, much of his early philosophical career was devoted to history of logic and historical logic. This interest laid the foundations for both of his ground-breaking innovations in the 1950s and 1960s. Because of the important rôle played by Prior's research in ancient and medieval logic in his development of temporal and hybrid logic, any student of Prior, temporal logic, or hybrid logic (...)
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  11.  3
    Nicholas Rescher (1964). Studies in the History of Arabic Logic. [Pittsburgh]University of Pittsburgh Press.
    Much attention has been given to Arabic thought in the history of philosophy, however, Arabic contributions to logic have been greatly overlooked. In the ten essays of this book, Nicholas Rescher presents substantial material on the history, progression and major trends of Arabic logic from the eighth through the sixteenth century. Rescher finds that, like much of Western thought, Arabic logic had its basis in Greek philosophy, and specifically in Hellenistic Aristotelian logic.
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  12.  67
    E. J. Ashworth (1974). Language and Logic in the Post-Medieval Period. Reidel.
    HISTORICAL INTRODUCTION Although many of the details of the development of logic in the Middle Ages remain to be filled in, it is well known that between ...
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  13. Lambertus Marie de Rijk (1962). Logica Modernorum a Contribution to the History of Early Terminist Logic. Van Gorcum H. J. & H. M. G. Prakke.
     
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  14. Gabriël Nuchelmans (1996). Studies on the History of Logic and Semantics, 12th-17th Centuries. Variorum.
  15.  30
    Catarina Dutilh Novaes (2006). Formalizations Après la Lettre: Studies in Medieval Logic and Semantics. Dissertation, Leiden University
    This thesis is on the history and philosophy of logic and semantics. Logic can be described as the ‘science of reasoning’, as it deals primarily with correct patterns of reasoning. However, logic as a discipline has undergone dramatic changes in the last two centuries: while for ancient and medieval philosophers it belonged essentially to the realm of language studies, it has currently become a sub-branch of mathematics. This thesis attempts to establish a dialogue between the modern and the (...)
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  16.  15
    Philotheus Boehner (1952). Medieval Logic. [Manchester, Eng.]Manchester University Press.
    PART ONE ELEMENTS OF SCHOLASTIC LOGIC I THE LEGACY OF SCHOLASTIC LOGIC "\ T 7E MAY safely describe the initial scholastic contri- VV bution to logical ...
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  17. Robert F. Brown (ed.) (2009). Hegel: Lectures on the History of Philosophy: Volume III: Medieval and Modern Philosophy, Revised Edition. OUP Oxford.
    The Hegel Lectures Series -/- Series Editor: Peter C. Hodgson -/- Hegel's lectures have had as great a historical impact as the works he himself published. Important elements of his system are elaborated only in the lectures, especially those given in Berlin during the last decade of his life. The original editors conflated materials from different sources and dates, obscuring the development and logic of Hegel's thought. The Hegel Lectures series is based on a selection of extant and recently discovered (...)
     
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  18. Norman Kretzmann & Eleonore Stump (eds.) (1989). The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts: Volume 1, Logic and the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first of a three-volume anthology intended as a companion to The Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy. Volume 1 is concerned with the logic and the philosophy of language, and comprises fifteen important texts on questions of meaning and inference that formed the basis of Medieval philosophy. As far as is practicable, complete works or topically complete segments of larger works have been selected. The editors have provided a full introduction to the volume and (...)
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  19. Norman Kretzmann & Eleonore Stump (eds.) (2012). The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts: Volume 1, Logic and the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first of a three-volume anthology intended as a companion to The Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy. Volume 1 is concerned with the logic and the philosophy of language, and comprises fifteen important texts on questions of meaning and inference that formed the basis of Medieval philosophy. As far as is practicable, complete works or topically complete segments of larger works have been selected. The editors have provided a full introduction to the volume and (...)
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  20. Robert Pasnau & Christina van Dyke (eds.) (2014). The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy 2 Volume Boxed Set. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy comprises over fifty specially commissioned essays by experts on the philosophy of this period. Starting in the late eighth century, with the renewal of learning some centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, a sequence of chapters takes the reader through developments in many and varied fields, including logic and language, natural philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, and theology. Close attention is paid to the context of medieval philosophy, with discussions of the (...)
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  21. Robert Pasnau & Christina van Dyke (eds.) (2014). The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy comprises over fifty specially commissioned essays by experts on the philosophy of this period. Starting in the late eighth century, with the renewal of learning some centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, a sequence of chapters takes the reader through developments in many and varied fields, including logic and language, natural philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, and theology. Close attention is paid to the context of medieval philosophy, with discussions of the (...)
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  22. G. W. F. Hegel (2009). Hegel: Lectures on the History of Philosophy Volume Iii: Medieval and Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Hegel Lectures SeriesSeries Editor: Peter C. Hodgson Hegel's interpretation of the history of philosophy not only played a central role in the shaping of his own thought, but also has had a great influence on the development of historical thinking. In his own view the study of the history of philosophy is the study of philosophy itself. This explains why such a large proportion of his lectures, from 1805 to 1831, the year of his death, were about (...)
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  23.  50
    Ivan Boh (1993). Epistemic Logic in the Later Middle Ages. Routledge.
    Epistemic logic is one of the most exciting areas in medieval philosophy. Neglected almost entirely after the end of the Middle Ages, it has been rediscovered by philosophers of the twentieth century. Epistemic Logic in the Later Middle Ages provides the first comprehensive study of the subject. Ivan Boh explores the contrast between epistemic and alethic conceptions of consequence, the general epistemic rules of consequence, the search for conditions of knowing contingent propositions, the problems of substitutivity in intentional contexts, (...)
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  24. Henry Chadwick (1981). Boethius, the Consolations of Music, Logic, Theology, and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The Consolations of Philosophy by Boethius, whose English translators include King Alfred, Geoffrey Chaucer, and Queen Elizabeth I, ranks among the most remarkable books to be written by a prisoner awaiting the execution of a tyrannical death sentence. Its interpretation is bound up with his other writings on mathematics and music, on Aristotelian and propositional logic, and on central themes of Christian dogma. -/- Chadwick begins by tracing the career of Boethius, a Roman rising to high office under the Gothic (...)
     
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  25.  18
    John Marenbon (1981/2006). From the Circle of Alcuin to the School of Auxerre: Logic, Theology, and Philosophy in the Early Middle Ages. New Yorkcambridge University Press.
    This study is the first modern account of the development of philosophy during the Carolingian Renaissance. In the late eighth century, Dr Marenbon argues, theologians were led by their enthusiasm for logic to pose themselves truly philosophical questions. The central themes of ninth-century philosophy - essence, the Aristotelian Categories, the problem of Universals - were to preoccupy thinkers throughout the Middle Ages. The earliest period of medieval philosophy was thus a formative one. This work is based on a fresh (...)
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  26.  22
    Thomas Williams (1997). History and Philosophy of Logic 18 (1997): 55-59. Review of T.J. Holopainen, Dialectic & Theology in the Eleventh Century . Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1996. History and Philosophy of Logic 1997:55-59.
    A venerable story in the history of medieval philosophy has it that the eleventh century saw a debate between certain 'dialecticians', who exalted the role of reason and disdained theological authority, and 'anti-dialecticians', who carefully limited—or even rejected—the application of dialectical reasoning to Christian doctrine. A number of authors have called into question certain details of this story, but in..
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  27.  10
    Charles H. Manekin (1996). Some Aspects of the Assertoric Syllogism in Medieval Hebrew Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 17 (1-2):49-71.
    This paper introduces the reader to the medieval Hebrew tradition of logic by considering its treatment of Aristotelian syllogistic. Starting in the thirteenth century European Jews translated Arabic and Latin texts into Hebrew and produced commentaries and original compendia.Because they stood culturally and geographically at the cross-roads of two great traditions they were influenced by both.This is clearly seen in the development of syllogistic theory, where the Latin tradition ultimately replaces, though never entirely, its Arabic counterpart.Specific attention is devoted (...)
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  28.  19
    Giorgio Pini (2002). Categories and Logic in Duns Scotus: An Interpretation of Aristotle's Categories in the Late Thirteenth Century. Brill.
    This study of the interpretations of Aristotle's "Categories" in the thirteenth century provides an introduction to some main themes of medieval philosophical ...
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  29.  17
    Christoph Kann (2006). Medieval Logic as a Formal Science. A Survey. In Benedikt Löwe, Boris Piwinger & Thoralf Räsch (eds.), Foundations of the Formal Sciences Iv. The History of the Concept of the Formal Sciences. 103--123.
    The paper discusses in how far medieval logic can appropriately be characterized as a formal science. In this respect, the special mediecal approach to logic as a scientia sermocinalis is examined as well as its main doctrines, namely the theories of supposition and of consequences, and the famous characterization of logic as an ars artium or scientia scientiarum. It is pointed out that medieval logic is not devoted to the setting up of formal systems or any metalogical analysis (...)
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  30.  7
    Nicholas Rescher (1964). The Development of Arabic Logic. [Pittsburgh]University of Pittsburgh Press.
    Arabic contributions to medicine, mathematics, astronomy, and other fields have been extensively studied, yet Arabic logic has never been systematically investigated. In this book, Nicholas Rescher sheds new light on the major philosophical contribution of Arab logicians. He provides a historical account of the evolution of Arabic logic, from its inception in the early ninth century through the sixteenth century, when these tenets gained wide acceptance. The book also includes a bio-bibliography of 170 Arabic logicians, and a discussion of the (...)
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  31.  9
    Nino Cocchiarella (2001). A Logical Reconstruction of Medieval Terminist Logic in Conceptual Realism. Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 4:35-72.
    The framework of conceptual realism provides a logically ideal language within which to reconstruct the medieval terminist logic of the 14th century. The terminist notion of a concept, which shifted from Ockham's early view of a concept as an intentional object to his later view of a concept as a mental act , is reconstructed in this framework in terms of the idea of concepts as unsaturated cognitive structures. Intentional objects are not rejected but are reconstructed as the objectified (...)
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  32.  21
    Mary Sirridge (2009). Formalizing Medieval Logic: Suppositio, Consequentiae and Obligationes (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 469-470.
    The overarching aim of this excellent book is to demonstrate the common ground between medieval logic and logical theories of the twentieth century by analyzing some important medieval approaches to three important topics in medieval logic and then showing that in each case, once we determine what is really going on in the medieval theory, it can be formalized in such a way as to show how it resembles one or more developments in twentieth-century logical theory. (...)
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  33.  51
    Desmond Paul Henry (1991). Medieval Mereology. B.R. Grüner.
    0. Introduction: Mereology, Metaphysics, and Speculative Grammar 0.1 Mereology, Ancient and Contemporary 0.11 Mereology is, strictly speaking, the theory of ...
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  34.  8
    Paul Thom (2014). Review of Terence Parsons, Articulating Medieval Logic. [REVIEW] History and Philosophy of Logic 36 (2):178-181.
  35.  9
    Andreas Blank (2014). Later Medieval Metaphysics. Ontology, Language & Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 35 (2):211-213.
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  36. Sten Ebbesen (1982). Ancient Scholastic Logic as the Source of Medieval Scholastic Logic. In Norman Kretzmann, Anthony Kenny & Jan Pinborg (eds.), Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge 101--27.
     
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  37.  1
    Paul Thom (2014). Review of Terence Parsons, Articulating Medieval Logic. [REVIEW] History and Philosophy of Logic 36 (2):178-181.
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  38.  3
    Katherine H. Tachau (2006). Logic's God and the Natural Order in Late Medieval Oxford: The Teaching of Robert Holcot. Annals of Science 53 (3):235-267.
    Recent students of late medieval intellectual history have treated Oxford theologians' Sentences lectures from the 1320s to 1330s as revealing the interface of the theological, logical, and scientific thinking characteristic of a historically momentous ‘New English Theology’. Its conceptual achievement, historians generally concur, was the casting off of the speculative metaphysics of such thirteenth-century authors as Robert Grosseteste and Roger Bacon; its methodological novelty made it akin to twentieth-century analytic philosophy and seminal for the early Scientific Revolution. Yet (...)
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  39.  3
    Mikko Yrjönsuuri (2003). Finnish Studies in the History of Ancient and Mediaeval Philosophy. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 80 (1):357-369.
    Finland is internationally known as one of the leading centers of twentieth century analytic philosophy. This volume offers for the first time an overall survey of the Finnish analytic school. The rise of this trend is illustrated by original articles of Edward Westermarck, Eino Kaila, Georg Henrik von Wright, and Jaakko Hintikka. Contributions of Finnish philosophers are then systematically discussed in the fields of logic, philosophy of language, philosophy of science, history of philosophy, ethics and social philosophy. Metaphilosophical reflections (...)
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  40. Andreas Blank (2013). Later Medieval Metaphysics. Ontology, Language & Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 35 (2):1-3.
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  41.  55
    Tim Crane (2012). Philosophy, Logic, Science, History. Metaphilosophy 43 (1-2):20-37.
    Analytic philosophy is sometimes said to have particularly close connections to logic and to science, and no particularly interesting or close relation to its own history. It is argued here that although the connections to logic and science have been important in the development of analytic philosophy, these connections do not come close to characterizing the nature of analytic philosophy, either as a body of doctrines or as a philosophical method. We will do better to understand analytic philosophy—and its (...)
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  42.  24
    Paolo Rossi (2000). Logic and the Art of Memory: The Quest for a Universal Language. University of Chicago Press.
    The mnemonic arts and the idea of a universal language that would capture the essence of all things were originally associated with cryptology, mysticism, and other occult practices. And it is commonly held that these enigmatic efforts were abandoned with the development of formal logic in the seventeenth century and the beginning of the modern era. In his distinguished book, Logic and the Art of Memory Italian philosopher and historian Paolo Rossi argues that this view is belied by an examination (...)
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  43. Allen Dupont Breck, Wolfgang Yourgrau, Hermann Bondi & Physical Reality History International Colloquium on Logic (1970). Physics, Logic, and History Based on the First International Colloquium Held at the University of Denver, May 16-20, 1966. [REVIEW] Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  44.  5
    Heine Hansen, Jakob Leth Fink & Ana María Mora-Márquez (2012). Logic and Language in the Middle Ages. Brill.
    Collection of articles on medieval logic and semantics. Introduction by Sten Ebbesen and 24 contributions by scholars in the history of medieval theories of language. The papers in this volume treat several aspects of the history of theories of language from the 12th to the 14th century, aspects that have in a way or another been dealt with by Ebbesen himself.Festschrift in honor of Sten Ebessen in the occasion of his 65th birthday.
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  45.  16
    Anthony Kenny (2005/2007). Medieval Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Sir Anthony Kenny here continues his fascinating account of the history of philosophy, focusing on the thousand-year-long medieval period. This is the second volume of a four-book set in which Kenny will unfold a magisterial new history of Western philosophy, the first major single-author history of philosophy to appear in decades. In this volume, Kenny takes us on a fascinating tour through more than a millennium of thought from 400 AD onwards, charting the story of philosophy (...)
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  46.  19
    Norman Kretzmann & Eleonore Stump (eds.) (1988). Logic and the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first of a three-volume anthology intended as a companion to The Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy. Volume 1 is concerned with the logic and the philosophy of language, and comprises fifteen important texts on questions of meaning and inference that formed the basis of Medieval philosophy. As far as is practicable, complete works or topically complete segments of larger works have been selected. The editors have provided a full introduction to the volume and (...)
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  47.  5
    Simo Knuutila (1993). Modalities in Medieval Philosophy. Routledge.
  48.  51
    Eleonore Stump (1989). Dialectic and its Place in the Development of Medieval Logic. Cornell University Press.
    Introduction Since my work in medieval logic has concentrated on dialectic. I have tried to trace scholastic treatments of dialectic to discussions of it in ...
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  49.  45
    Alexander Broadie (1993). Introduction to Medieval Logic. Oxford University Press.
    Medieval logicians advanced far beyond the logic of Aristotle, and this book shows how far that advance took them in two central areas. Broadie focuses upon the work of some of the great figures of the fourteenth century, including Walter Burley, William Ockham, John Buridan, Albert of Saxony, and Paul of Venice, and deals with their theories of truth conditions and validity conditions. He reveals how much of what seems characteristically twentieth-century logic was familiar long ago. Broadie has extensively (...)
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  50.  6
    John Marenbon (ed.) (2007). The Many Roots of Medieval Logic: The Aristotelian and the Non-Aristotelian Traditions: Special Offprint of Vivarium 45, 2-3 (2007). [REVIEW] Brill.
    The specialized essays in this collection study whether non-Aristotelian traditions of ancient logic had a role for medieval logicians. Special attention is given to Stoic logic and semantics, and to Neoplatonism.
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