Search results for 'Logical positivism Sources' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Moritz Schlick, Rudolf Carnap, Otto Neurath & Sahotra Sarkar (eds.) (1996). Logical Empiricism at its Peak: Schlick, Carnap, and Neurath. Garland Pub..score: 234.0
    A new direction in philosophy Between 1920 and 1940 logical empiricism reset the direction of philosophy of science and much of the rest of Anglo-American philosophy. It began as a relatively organized movement centered on the Vienna Circle, and like-minded philosophers elsewhere, especially in Berlin. As Europe drifted into the Nazi era, several important figures, especially Carnap and Neurath, also found common ground in their liberal politics and radical social agenda. Together, the logical empiricists set out to reform (...)
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  2. Michael Friedman (1999). Reconsidering Logical Positivism. Cambridge University Press.score: 224.0
    In this collection of essays one of the preeminent philosophers of science writing today offers a reinterpretation of the enduring significance of logical positivism, the revolutionary philosophical movement centered around the Vienna Circle in the 1920s and '30s. Michael Friedman argues that the logical positivists were radicals not by presenting a new version of empiricism (as is often thought to be the case) but rather by offering a new conception of a priori knowledge and its role in (...)
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  3. Stephen K. McLeod (2008). Knowledge of Necessity: Logical Positivism and Kripkean Essentialism. Philosophy 83 (324):179-191.score: 224.0
    By the lights of a central logical positivist thesis in modal epistemology, for every necessary truth that we know, we know it a priori and for every contingent truth that we know, we know it a posteriori. Kripke attacks on both flanks, arguing that we know necessary a posteriori truths and that we probably know contingent a priori truths. In a reflection of Kripke's confidence in his own arguments, the first of these Kripkean claims is far more widely accepted (...)
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  4. A. J. Ayer (ed.) (1978). Logical Positivism. Greenwood Press.score: 224.0
    Edited by a leading exponent of the school, this book offers--in the words of the movement's founders--logical positivism's revolutionary theories on meaning and metaphysics, the nature of logic and mathematics, the foundations of knowledge ...
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  5. Jaegwon Kim (2003). Logical Positivism and the Mind-Body Problem. In Paolo Parrini, Wes Salmon & Merrilee Salmon (eds.), Logical Empiricism: Historical & Contemporary Perspectives. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.score: 202.0
     
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  6. James Connelly (2009). R.G. Collingwood, Analytical Philosophy And Logical Positivism. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 4 (1):2.score: 198.0
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  7. Robert DiSalle (2002). Reconsidering Kant, Friedman, Logical Positivism, and the Exact Sciences. Philosophy of Science 69 (2):191-211.score: 196.3
    This essay considers the nature of conceptual frameworks in science, and suggests a reconsideration of the role played by philosophy in radical conceptual change. On Kuhn's view of conceptual conflict, the scientist's appeal to philosophical principles is an obvious symptom of incommensurability; philosophical preferences are merely “subjective factors” that play a part in the “necessarily circular” arguments that scientists offer for their own conceptual commitments. Recent work by Friedman has persuasively challenged this view, revealing the roles that philosophical concerns have (...)
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  8. Laurence D. Smith (1986). Behaviorism And Logical Positivism: A Reassessment Of The Alliance. Stanford: Stanford University Press.score: 196.0
    ONE Introduction The history of psychology in the twentieth century is a story of the divorce and remarriage of psychology and philosophy. ...
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  9. Frederick C. Copleston (2002/1979). Contemporary Philosophy: Studies of Logical Positivism and Existentialism. Continuum.score: 196.0
    Originally written in 1956 and revised in 1972, this book explores the work of many of the most important thinkers of the 20th century, including Ayer, ...
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  10. Gustav Bergmann (1978). The Metaphysics of Logical Positivism. Greenwood Press.score: 196.0
  11. Thomas E. Uebel (1992). Overcoming Logical Positivism From Within: The Emergence of Neurath's Naturalism in the Vienna Circle's Protocol Sentence Debate. Rodopi.score: 196.0
    Chapter INTRODUCTION: OTTO NEURATH, THE VIENNA CIRCLE AND THE PROTOCOL SENTENCE DEBATE Everybody familiar with contemporary analytical philosophy is likely ...
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  12. C. E. M. Joad (1950). A Critique of Logical Positivism. Chicago, University of Chicago Press.score: 196.0
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  13. Oswald Hanfling (1981). Logical Positivism. Columbia University Press.score: 196.0
     
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  14. Peter Achinstein & Stephen Francis Barker (eds.) (1969). The Legacy of Logical Positivism. Baltimore, Johns Hopkins Press.score: 196.0
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  15. Wolfhard F. Boeselager (1975). The Soviet Critique of Neopositivism: The History and Structure of the Critique of Logical Positivism and Related Doctrines by Soviet Philosophers in the Years 1947-1967. Reidel Pub. Co..score: 196.0
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  16. S. N. Ganguly (1967). Logical Positivism as a Theory of Meaning. New York, Allied Publishers.score: 196.0
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  17. Oswald Hanfling (ed.) (1981). Essential Readings in Logical Positivism. Blackwell.score: 196.0
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  18. R. T. Jangam (1970). Logical Positivism and Politics. Delhi,Sterling Publishers.score: 196.0
  19. C. A. Qadir (1965). Logical Positivism. Lahore, Pakistan Philosophical Congress.score: 196.0
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  20. Syed A. Rahim (1990). Logical Positivism and Metaphysics: A Defence of Metaphysics Against the Logical Positivists' Criticisms. Rahim Publishers.score: 196.0
     
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  21. K. Srinivas (2011). Logical Positivism Revisited. D.K. Printworld.score: 196.0
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  22. Sean Crawford (2014). On the Logical Positivists' Philosophy of Psychology: Laying a Legend to Rest. In Maria Carla Galavotti, Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao J. Gonzalez, Stephan Hartmann, Thomas Uebel & Marcel Weber (eds.), New Directions in Philosophy of Science. The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective Vol. 5. Springer. 711-726.score: 188.3
    The received view in the history of the philosophy of psychology is that the logical positivists—Carnap and Hempel in particular—endorsed the position commonly known as “logical” or “analytical” behaviourism, according to which the relations between psychological statements and the physical-behavioural statements intended to give their meaning are analytic and knowable a priori. This chapter argues that this is sheer legend: most, if not all, such relations were viewed by the logical positivists as synthetic and knowable only a (...)
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  23. Barry Smith (1988). Austrian Origins of Logical Positivism. In Barry Gower (ed.), Logical Positivism in Perspective. Croom Helm.score: 186.0
    Recent work on Austrian philosophy has revealed, hitherto, unsuspected links between Vienna circle positivism on the one hand, and the thought of Franz Brentano and his circle on the other. the paper explores these links, casting light also on the Polish analytic movement, on the development of gestalt psychology, and on the work of Schlick and Neurath.
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  24. Gustav Bergmann (1967). Logical Positivism, Language, and the Reconstruction of Metaphysics. In The Metaphysics of Logical Positivism. University of Wisconsin Press. 29-.score: 168.0
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  25. Richard F. Kitchener (2004). Logical Positivism, Naturalistic Epistemology, and the Foundations of Psychology. Behavior and Philosophy 32 (1):37 - 54.score: 168.0
    According to the standard account, logical positivism was the philosophical foundation of psychological neo-behaviorism. Smith (1986) has questioned this interpretation, suggesting that neo-behaviorism drew its philosophical inspiration from a different tradition, one more in keeping with naturalistic epistemology. Smith does not deny, however, the traditional interpretation of the philosophy of logical positivism, which sets it apart from naturalistic epistemology. In this article I suggest (following recent historical scholarship) that a more careful reading of the leading figure (...)
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  26. Thomas Uebel (2013). Logical Positivism”—“Logical Empiricism”: What's in a Name? Perspectives on Science 21 (1):58-99.score: 168.0
    Do the terms “logical positivism” and “logical empiricism” mark a philosophically real and significant distinction? There is, of course, no doubt that the first term designates the group of philosophers known as the Vienna Circle, headed by Moritz Schlick and including Rudolf Carnap, Herbert Feigl, Philipp Frank, Hans Hahn, Otto Neurath, Friedrich Waismann and others. What is debatable, however, is whether the name “logical positivism” correctly distinguishes their doctrines from related ones called “logical empiricism” (...)
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  27. Alan W. Richardson & Thomas E. Uebel (2005). The Epistemic Agent in Logical Positivism. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 79:73 - 105.score: 168.0
    [Alan W. Richardson] This essay explores the uses that Michael Friedman and Bas van Fraassen have recently made of the work of Hans Reichenbach. It uses Friedman's work to complicate van Fraassen's invocation of Reichenbach's voluntarism in support of empiricism. It uses van Fraassen's work to motivate a concern with Friedman's neo-Kantian reading of Reichenbach. We are, finally, left with questions about the status and content of the account of the epistemic subject available to an epistemological voluntarist. /// (...)
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  28. James Van Evra (1994). Quine and Logical Positivism. Journal of Philosophical Research 19:263-271.score: 168.0
    The work of W.V.O. Quine is often held to folIow the logical positivism of the Vienna Circle in broad outline, but to diverge from it in crucial particulars. On the basis of recent reevaluations of the latter, I argue that the philosophical distance between Quine and the Vienna Circle is less than ordinarily thought, or, most importantly, than Quine himself admits.
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  29. M. A. Notturno (1997). Thomas Kuhn and the Legacy of Logical Positivism. History of the Human Sciences 10 (1):131-134.score: 168.0
    Thomas Kuhn died last June, and with him the last of the great 20th-century\nphilosophers of science passed into history. In order to understand this\nhistory, it is necessary to understand Kuhn’s relationship to what came before\nhim. Logical positivism is what came before Kuhn. And many people misunderstand\nthe relationship between the two. Michael Friedman’s account is\nrepresentative. Friedman writes that the ’official demise of’ logical positivism\n’took place sometime between the publication of W. V Quine’s ’Two Dogmas\nof Empiricism’ (1951), and (...)
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  30. Robert Elias Abu Shanab (forthcoming). Tolman: Operationalism and Logical Positivism. Pakistan Philosophical Journal.score: 168.0
    The aim of this paper is to exhibit the influence of both logical positivism and operationalism on neo-behaviorism. specifically, i shall attempt to show how logical positivists and p w bridgman influenced the neo-behaviorist, e c tolman. it is my contention that the methodological views championed by logical positivism and by bridgman deeply influenced tolman who was genuinely concerned with (a) finding an adequate base to anchor securely his purposive behaviorism, and (b) finding sound ways (...)
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  31. Michael LeMahieu (2013). Fictions of Fact and Value: The Erasure of Logical Positivism in American Literature, 1945-1975. Oup Usa.score: 168.0
    Fictions of Fact and Value looks at logical positivism's major influence on the development of postwar American fiction, charting a literary and philosophical genealogy that has been absent from criticism on the American novel since 1945.
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  32. Stephen F. Barker (1969). Logical Positivism and the Philosophy of Mathematics. In Peter Achinstein & Stephen Francis Barker (eds.), The Legacy of Logical Positivism. Baltimore, Johns Hopkins Press. 229--257.score: 168.0
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  33. Norwood Russell Hanson (1969). Logical Positivism and the Interpretation of Scientific Theories. In Peter Achinstein & Stephen Francis Barker (eds.), The Legacy of Logical Positivism. Baltimore, Johns Hopkins Press.score: 168.0
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  34. Carl Gustav Hempel (1969). Logical Positivism and the Social Sciences. In Peter Achinstein & Stephen Francis Barker (eds.), The Legacy of Logical Positivism. Baltimore, Johns Hopkins Press.score: 168.0
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  35. Michael Scriven (1969). Logical Positivism and the Behavioral Sciences. In Peter Achinstein & Stephen Francis Barker (eds.), The Legacy of Logical Positivism. Baltimore, Johns Hopkins Press. 195--209.score: 168.0
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  36. Charles W. Morris (1937/1979). Logical Positivism, Pragmatism, and Scientific Empiricism. Ams Press.score: 152.0
  37. Cornelius L. Maloney (1951). Logical Positivism and American Education. Washington, Catholic University of America Press.score: 152.0
     
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  38. Julius R. Weinberg (1935). Logical Positivism of the Viennese Circle. [Ithaca? N.Y.].score: 152.0
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  39. J. A. Passmore (1943). Logical Positivism, Part I. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 21.score: 148.0
    The author discusses how carnap, Schlick, And others attempted to derive logic from science and not philosophy. He explicates schlick's theory of verification, Carnap's protocol statements, And verifiability. In conclusion he shows how the positivists contend that the "rules of language will show what is verifiable." the implications this has for metaphysics will be discussed in part ii. (staff).
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  40. Luis M. Laita (1980). Boolean Algebra and its Extra-Logical Sources: The Testimony of Mary Everest Boole. History and Philosophy of Logic 1 (1-2):37-60.score: 146.0
    Mary Everest, Boole's wife, claimed after the death of her husband that his logic had a psychological, pedagogical, and religious origin and aim rather than the mathematico-logical ones assigned to it by critics and scientists. It is the purpose of this paper to examine the validity of such a claim. The first section consists of an exposition of the claim without discussing its truthfulness; the discussion is left for the sections 2?4, in which some arguments provided by the examination (...)
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  41. John Arthur Passmore (1948). Logical Positivism (III). Australasian Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):1 – 19.score: 146.0
    The author investigates carnap's rejection of "problems of reality" (both metaphysics and epistemology). This includes a section on positivism and ethics. He concludes that correspondence theories are untenable. (staff).
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  42. Gregory D. Gilson (2012). Latin American and Logical Positivism. In Gregory Gilson & Irving Levinson (eds.), Latin American Positivism: New Historical and Philosophic Essays. Lexington Books. 13.score: 146.0
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  43. Alan Richardson (2007). 'That Sort of Everyday Image of Logical Positivism': Thomas Kuhn and the Decline of Logical Empiricist Philosophy of Science. In A. Richardson & T. Uebel (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Logical Empiricism. Cup.score: 146.0
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  44. Jonathan Harrison (1989). Logical Positivism and Ethics. Cogito 3 (3):179-186.score: 142.0
    ADDRESS ETHICS WITHOUT PROPOSITIONS. By WINSTON H. F. BARNES 1 SYMPOSIUM : ARE ALL PHILOSOPHICAL QUESTIONS, QUESTIONS OF LANGUAGE I. By STUART HAMPSHIRE 31 II. By AUSTIN DUNAN JONES 49 III. By S. KORNER 63 SYMPOSIUM : THE EMOTIVE THEORY OF ETHICS. f. By RICHARD ROBINSON 79 II. ByH. J. PATON 107 III. ByR.C. CROSS 127 SYMPOSIUM : WHAT CAN LOGIC DO FOR PHILOSOPHY I. By K. K. POPPER 141 II. By WILLIAM KNEALE 155 III. By PROFESSOR A. J. AYER (...)
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  45. Charles A. Baylis (1948). Review: J. A. Passmore, Logical Positivism; J. A. Passmore, Prediction and Scientific Law. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 13 (1):58-58.score: 142.0
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  46. George D. W. Berry (1952). Review: James K. Feibleman, The Metaphysics of Logical Positivism. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 17 (3):218-218.score: 142.0
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  47. Henry Mehlberg (1958). Review: Thomas Storer, An Analysis of Logical Positivism; Ferruccio Rossi-Landi, Discussion: An Analysis of Logical Positivism. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 23 (3):356-357.score: 142.0
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  48. W. V. Quine (1937). Review: Julius Rudolph Weinberg, An Examination of Logical Positivism. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 2 (2):89-90.score: 142.0
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  49. John Skorupski (2005). Later Empiricism and Logical Positivism. In Stewart Shapiro (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Mathematics and Logic. Oxford University Press. 29--4.score: 142.0
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  50. Max Black (1947). Review: Bertrand Russell, Logical Positivism. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 12 (1):24-24.score: 142.0
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