Search results for 'Lokayata' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  39
    Krishna Del Toso (2010). The Stanzas on the Cārvāka/Lokāyata in the Skhalitapramathanayuktihetusiddhi. Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (6):543-552.
    in Āryadevapāda’s Skhalitapramathanayuktihetusiddhi we find a problematic passage in which some Cārvāka theories are expounded. The problem here lies in the fact that, according to Āryadevapāda, the Cārvākas – who did not admit rebirth – would have upheld that happiness in this life can be gaind by worshipping gods and defeating demons. As the Cārvākas were materialists, the reference to gods and demons does not fit so much with their philosophical perspective. In this paper, by taking into account several passages (...)
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  2.  22
    Krishna Del Toso (2010). The Stanzas on the Cārvāka/Lokāyata in the Skhalitapramathanayuktihetusiddhi. Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (6):543-552.
    In Āryadevapāda’s Skhalitapramathanayuktihetusiddhi we find a problematic passage in which some Cārvāka theories are expounded. The problem here lies in the fact that, according to Āryadevapāda, the Cārvākas—who did not admit rebirth—would have upheld that happiness in this life can be gained by worshipping gods and defeating demons. As the Cārvākas were materialists, the reference to gods and demons does not fit so much with their philosophical perspective. In this paper, by taking into account several passages from Pāli and Sanskrit (...)
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  3.  9
    Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (2012). Svabhāvavāda and the Cārvāka/Lokāyata: A Historical Overview. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (6):593-614.
    svabhāva (own being) and yadṛchhā (chance, accident) are named as two different claimants among others as the first cause (jagatkāraṇa) in the ŚvUp. But in later works, such as Aśvaghoṣa’s poems, svabhāva is synonymous with yadṛchhā and entails a passive attitude to life. Later still, svabhāva is said to be inhering in the Lokāyata materialist system, although in which sense—cosmic order or accident—is not always clearly mentioned. Svabhāva is also a part of the Sāṃkhya doctrine and is mentioned in the (...)
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  4. Krishna Del Toso (2010). The Stanzas on the Cārvāka/Lokāyata in the Skhalitapramathanayuktihetusiddhi. Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (6):543-552.
    In Āryadevapāda’s Skhalitapramathanayuktihetusiddhi we find a problematic passage in which some Cārvāka theories are expounded. The problem here lies in the fact that, according to Āryadevapāda, the Cārvākas—who did not admit rebirth—would have upheld that happiness in this life can be gained by worshipping gods and defeating demons. As the Cārvākas were materialists, the reference to gods and demons does not fit so much with their philosophical perspective. In this paper, by taking into account several passages from Pāli and Sanskrit (...)
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  5. Rāmakr̥shṇa Bhaṭṭācārya (2009). Studies on the Cārvāka/Lokāyata. Società Editrice Fiorentina.
     
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  6. Krishna Del Toso (2010). Book Review: Ramkrishna Bhattacharya, Studies on the Carvaka/Lokayata, Società Editrice Fiorentina, Firenze 2009, € 28,00; Indian Edition: Manohar Publishers, New Delhi 2010, Rs. 750. [REVIEW] Psyche and Society 8 (2):81-84.
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  7. Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya (1959). Lokayata a Study in Ancient Indian Materialism. People's Pub. House.
     
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  8. Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya & Mrinalkanti Gangopadhyaya (eds.) (1990). Cārvāka/Lokāyata: An Anthology of Source Materials and Some Recent Studies. Indian Council of Philosophical Research in Association with R̥ddhi-India, Calcutta.
     
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  9. Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya (1968). Lōkayata. [New Delhi]People's Pub. House.
     
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  10. Subuddhi Charan Goswami (ed.) (2010). Lokāyata Philosophy: A Fresh Appraisal. Asiatic Society.
     
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  11. Shubhada A. Joshi (1995). Lokāyata, a Critical Study: Indian Spiritualism Reaffirmed. Sri Satguru Publications.
     
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  12. Bijayananda Kar (2013). The Philosophy of Lokāyata: A Review and Reconstruction. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
     
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  13. Hara Prasad Shastri (1982). Lokayata and Vratya. Available with Firma K.L. Mukhopadhyay.
     
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  14.  42
    Krishna Del Toso (2013). Tutto in questa vita: considerazioni sull’etica e la morale dei Cārvāka/Lokāyata. In Krishna Del Toso & Pietro Piro (eds.), Perché guardare a Oriente? Prospettive, risorse e visioni di un mondo non più lontano. Tipheret Editore 117-133.
    In questo saggio sono espresse alcune riflessioni concernenti l’orizzonte etico-morale proprio della scuola di materialismo indiana nota con il nome di Cārvāka/Lokāyata. La discussione si sviluppa secondo i seguenti punti: 1. Gli assunti ontologico-psicologici; 2. Gli assunti epistemologici; 3. L’etica e la morale; 4. Conclusioni.
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  15. Pradeep P. Gokhale (2015). Lokayata/Carvaka: A Philosophical Inquiry. Oxford University Press India.
    Philosophy in Indian tradition as a purely secular and rational exercise can be located in the Lokayata/Carvaka school of Indian philosophy. Due to the lack of substantial literary sources, scholars did not try to explore Lokayata philosophically. The present work is the first attempt to explore the philosophical energies inherent in the scattered Carvaka literature through critical and analytical discussions firmly grounded in textual evidences.
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  16.  6
    Shubhada Joshi (1993). Lokayata and the Obligation to Pay Debts. Social Philosophy Today 9:319-328.
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  17. Krishna Del Toso (2011). The Wolf’s Footprints: Indian Materialism in Perspective. An Annotated Conversation with Ramkrishna Bhattacharya. AION 71:183-204.
    An interview with Ramkrishna Bhattacharya on Cārvāka/Lokāyata philosophy.
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  18.  42
    Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (2010). Commentators on the Cārvākasūtra: A Critical Survey. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (4):419-430.
    In spite of the fact that the mūla-text of the Cārvākasūtra is lost, we have some 30 fragments of the commentaries written by no fewer than four commentators, namely, Kambalāśvatara, Purandara, Aviddhakarṇa, and Udbhaṭa. The existence of other commentators too has been suggested, of whom only one name is mentioned: Bhāvivikta. Unfortunately no extract from his work is quoted anywhere. The position of the Cārvākas was nearer the Buddhists (who admitted both perception and inference) than any other philosophical system. But (...)
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  19.  4
    Eli Franco (1987). Perception, Knowledge, and Disbelief: A Study of Jayarāśi's Scepticism. F. Steiner Verlag Wiesbaden.
  20.  4
    Eli Franco (forthcoming). Final Notes on the Sadvitīyaprayoga. Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (2):1-11.
    The following response first points out the obvious methodological disadvantages of Oetke’s decline to use both primary and secondary sources for his interpretation of the sadvitīyaprayoga. Oetke believes that he is able to provide an “objectively adequate” presentation of the sp and describe “the objective properties” of its content without taking the historical context into account. By divorcing meaning from context, he distorts the presumed original meaning and intention of the sp, and superimposes on it an anachronistic concern with what (...)
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  21.  1
    Kewal Krishan Mittal (1974). Materialism in Indian Thought. [New Delhi]Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.
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  22. Dakshinaranjan Shastri (1930). A Short History of Indian Materialism, Sensationalism and Hedonism. Calcutta, the Book Company.
     
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  23. Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya (1977). Two Trends in Indian Philosophy. Prasaranga, University of Mysore.
     
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  24. Jayarāśibhaṭṭa (2010). Tattvopaplavasiṃhaḥ. Parimal Publications.
     
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  25. Jayarāśibhaṭṭa (2013). Tattvopaplavasiṁha of Jayarāśibhaṭṭa. Chinmaya International Foundation Shodha Sansthan.
     
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  26. K. B. Krishna (1994). Studies in Hindu Materialism. Milinda Publications.
     
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  27. Dilipkumar Mohanta (2009). Studies in Jayarāsi Bhaṭṭa's Critique of Knowing From Words: Tattvopaplavasiṁha: Śabdaprāmāṇyasya Nirāsaḥ. The Asiatic Society.
     
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  28. Ke Padmārāvu (1997). Charvaka Darshan: Ancient Indian Dalit Philosophy. The Author.
     
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  29. Dakshinaranjan Shastri (1967). Charvaka Philosophy. Calcutta, Purogami Prakashani.
     
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  30.  15
    Paul Ghils (2015). Editorial, Cosmopolis. Spirituality, Religion and Politics. Cosmopolis. A Journal of Cosmopolitics 7 (3-4).
    Cosmopolis A Review of Cosmopolitics -/- 2015/3-4 -/- Editorial Dominique de Courcelles & Paul Ghils -/- This issue addresses the general concept of “spirituality” as it appears in various cultural contexts and timeframes, through contrasting ideological views. Without necessarily going back to artistic and religious remains of primitive men, which unquestionably show pursuits beyond the biophysical dimension and illustrate practices seeking to unveil the hidden significance of life and death, the following papers deal with a number of interpretations covering a (...)
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  31.  14
    Desh Raj Sirswal (2016). Philosophy of Sufism and Islam. Lokayata: Journal of Positive Philosophy (01):34-38.
    Many different meanings are attributed to the term Sufi. From the philosophical standpoint the sufi sect leans towards the mystic tradition, while taken etymologically the word implies anything which is extracted from wool. Sufi was the term applied to those individuals who went through life wearing a woolen gown, spending their life in mediation and prayer. Other scholars are of the opinion that the terms sufi is derived from the root “Suffa” which is applicable to the platform built by Mohammad (...)
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  32.  6
    Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (2010). What the Cārvākas Originally Meant. Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (6):529-542.
    This essay proposes to review the problems of reconstructing and interpreting ancient texts, particularly philosophical commentaries, in the context of the Cārvāka/Lokāyata system of India. Following an overview of the Indian philosophical text tradition and the ontological and epistemological positions of the Cārvākas, three cases are discussed: (1) when there is no invariance in the text and the commentary, (2) when commentators differ among themselves in their interpretations, and (3) when contradictory interpretations are offered. The paper further discusses why certain (...)
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  33. J. Muir (1990). Verses Illustrating the Cārvāka Tenets. In Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya & Mrinalkanti Gangopadhyaya (eds.), Cārvāka/Lokāyata: An Anthology of Source Materials and Some Recent Studies. Indian Council of Philosophical Research in Association with R̥ddhi-India, Calcutta 351--68.
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