Search results for 'Lora Gross' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lindon Eaves & Lora Gross (1992). Exploring the Concept of Spirit as a Model for the God-World Relationship in the Age of Genetics. Zygon 27 (3):261-285.score: 240.0
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  2. Michael L. Gross (2010). Michael L. Gross Replies. Hastings Center Report 40 (5):5-5.score: 180.0
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  3. Steven Gross, Steven Gross.score: 180.0
    Should a theory of meaning state what sentences mean, and can a Davidsonian theory of meaning in particular do so? Max Ko¨lbel answers both questions affirmatively. I argue, however, that the phenomena of non-homophony, non-truth-conditional aspects of meaning, semantic mood, and context-sensitivity provide prima facie obstacles for extending Davidsonian truth-theories to yield meaning-stating theorems. Assessing some natural moves in reply requires a more fully developed conception of the task of such theories than Ko¨lbel provides. A more developed conception is also (...)
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  4. P. Maurizio, M. K. Gross & H. R. Scholer (1998). Errata-Maurizio P, Gross, MK, Scholer HR. 1998. In Line with Our Ancestors: Oct-4 and the Mammalian Germ. Bioessays 20 (12):1056.score: 180.0
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  5. Steven Gross & Jennifer Culbertson (2011). Revisited Linguistic Intuitions. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (3):639-656.score: 60.0
    Michael Devitt ([2006a], [2006b]) argues that, insofar as linguists possess better theories about language than non-linguists, their linguistic intuitions are more reliable. ( Culbertson and Gross [2009] ) presented empirical evidence contrary to this claim. Devitt ([2010]) replies that, in part because we overemphasize the distinction between acceptability and grammaticality, we misunderstand linguists’ claims, fall into inconsistency, and fail to see how our empirical results can be squared with his position. We reply in this note. Inter alia we argue (...)
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  6. Jennifer Culbertson & Steven Gross (2011). Revisited Linguistic Intuitions. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (3):639 - 656.score: 60.0
    Michael Devitt ([2006a], [2006b]) argues that, insofar as linguists possess better theories about language than non-linguists, their linguistic intuitions are more reliable. (Culbertson and Gross [2009]) presented empirical evidence contrary to this claim. Devitt ([2010]) replies that, in part because we overemphasize the distinction between acceptability and grammaticality, we misunderstand linguists' claims, fall into inconsistency, and fail to see how our empirical results can be squared with his position. We reply in this note. Inter alia we argue that Devitt's (...)
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  7. Daniel M. Gross (2006). The Secret History of Emotion: From Aristotle's Rhetoric to Modern Brain Science. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    Princess Diana’s death was a tragedy that provoked mourning across the globe; the death of a homeless person, more often than not, is met with apathy. How can we account for this uneven distribution of emotion? Can it simply be explained by the prevailing scientific understanding? Uncovering a rich tradition beginning with Aristotle, The Secret History of Emotion offers a counterpoint to the way we generally understand emotions today. Through a radical rereading of Aristotle, Seneca, Thomas Hobbes, Sarah Fielding, and (...)
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  8. Neil Gross (2008). Richard Rorty: The Making of an American Philosopher. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    On his death in 2007, Richard Rorty was heralded by the New York Times as “one of the world’s most influential contemporary thinkers.” Controversial on the left and the right for his critiques of objectivity and political radicalism, Rorty experienced a renown denied to all but a handful of living philosophers. In this masterly biography, Neil Gross explores the path of Rorty’s thought over the decades in order to trace the intellectual and professional journey that led him to that (...)
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  9. Alan G. Gross & Arthur E. Walzer (eds.) (2008). Rereading Aristotle's Rhetoric. Southern Illinois University Press.score: 60.0
    In this collection edited by Alan G. Gross and Arthur E. Walzer, scholars in communication, rhetoric and composition, and philosophy seek to “reread” Aristotle’s Rhetoric from a purely rhetorical perspective.
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  10. Steven Gross & Georges Rey (forthcoming). Innateness. In Eric Margolis, Richard Samuels & Stephen Stich (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Cognitive Science. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    A survey of innateness in cognitive science, focusing on (1) what innateness might be, and (2) whether concepts might be innate.
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  11. Jennifer Culbertson & Steven Gross (2009). Are Linguists Better Subjects? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (4):721-736.score: 30.0
    Who are the best subjects for judgment tasks intended to test grammatical hypotheses? Michael Devitt ( [2006a] , [2006b] ) argues, on the basis of a hypothesis concerning the psychology of such judgments, that linguists themselves are. We present empirical evidence suggesting that the relevant divide is not between linguists and non-linguists, but between subjects with and without minimally sufficient task-specific knowledge. In particular, we show that subjects with at least some minimal exposure to or knowledge of such tasks tend (...)
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  12. Steven Gross, Knowledge of Meaning, Conscious and Unconscious. Meaning, Understanding and Knowledge (Vol 5: The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication).score: 30.0
    This paper motivates two bases for ascribing propositional semantic knowledge (or something knowledgelike): first, because it’s necessary to rationalize linguistic action; and, second, because it’s part of an empirical theory that would explain various aspects of linguistic behavior. The semantic knowledge ascribed on these two bases seems to differ in content, epistemic status, and cognitive role. This raises the question: how are they related, if at all? The bulk of the paper addresses this question. It distinguishes a variety of answers (...)
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  13. Steven Gross (2009). Review of Ray Jackendoff, Language, Consciousness, Culture. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 20095.score: 30.0
  14. Steven Gross (2009). Review of Stewart Shapiro, Vagueness in Context. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 118 (2):261-266.score: 30.0
    Stewart Shapiro’s book develops a contextualist approach to vagueness. It’s chock-full of ideas and arguments, laid out in wonderfully limpid prose. Anyone working on vagueness (or the other topics it touches on—see below) will want to read it. According to Shapiro, vague terms have borderline cases: there are objects to which the term neither determinately applies nor determinately does not apply. A term determinately applies in a context iff the term’s meaning and the non-linguistic facts determine that they do. The (...)
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  15. Steven Gross (2010). Origins of Human Communication - by Michael Tomasello. Mind and Language 25 (2):237-246.score: 30.0
  16. Steven Gross (2012). Davidson, First-Person Authority, and the Evidence for Semantics. In Gerhard Preyer (ed.), Donald Davidson on Truth, Meaning, and the Mental. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Donald Davidson aims to illuminate the concept of meaning by asking: What knowledge would suffice to put one in a position to understand the speech of another, and what evidence sufficiently distant from the concepts to be illuminated could in principle ground such knowledge? Davidson answers: knowledge of an appropriate truth-theory for the speaker’s language, grounded in what sentences the speaker holds true, or prefers true, in what circumstances. In support of this answer, he both outlines such a truth-theory for (...)
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  17. Steven Gross (2007). Reply to Jackendoff. The Linguistic Review 24 (4):423-429.score: 30.0
    In this note, I clarify the point of my paper “The Nature of Semantics: On Jackendoff’s Arguments” (NS) in light of Ray Jackendoff’s comments in his “Linguistics in Cognitive Science: The State of the Art.” Along the way, I amplify my remarks on unification.
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  18. Michael L. Gross (2006). Assassination and Targeted Killing: Law Enforcement, Execution or Self-Defence? Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (3):323–335.score: 30.0
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  19. Neil Gross (2005). The Detraditionalization of Intimacy Reconsidered. Sociological Theory 23 (3):286-311.score: 30.0
    This essay challenges those strains of contemporary social theory that regard romantic/sexual intimacy as a premier site of detraditionalization in the late modern era. Striking changes have occurred in intimacy and family life over the last half-century, but the notion of detraditionalization as currently formulated does not capture them very well. With the goal of achieving a more refined understanding, the article proposes a distinction between "regulative" and "meaning-constitutive" traditions. The former involve threats of exclusion from various moral communities; the (...)
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  20. Steven Gross (2004). Putnam, Context, and Ontology. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (4):507 - 553.score: 30.0
    When a debate seems intractable, with little agreement as to how one might proceed towards a resolution, it is understandable that philosophers should consider whether something might be amiss with the debate itself. Famously in the last century, philosophers of various stripes explored in various ways the possibility that at least certain philosophical debates are in some manner deficient in sense. Such moves are no longer so much in vogue. For one thing, the particular ways they have been made have (...)
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  21. Steven Gross, The Nature of Semantics: On Jackendoff's Arguments.score: 30.0
    Jackendoff defends a mentalist approach to semantics that investigates con- ceptual structures in the mind/brain and their interfaces with other structures, including specifically linguistic structures responsible for syntactic and phono- logical competence. He contrasts this approach with one that seeks to charac- terize the intentional relations between expressions and objects in the world. The latter, he argues, cannot be reconciled with mentalism. He objects in par- ticular that intentionality cannot be naturalized and that the relevant notion of object is suspect. (...)
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  22. Steven Gross, Review of Brandom's Articulating Reasons. [REVIEW]score: 30.0
    There is nothing in [the six chapters that make up the body of Articulating Reasons] that will come as a surprise to anyone who has mastered [Making It Explicit]. … I had in mind audiences that had perhaps not so much as dipped into the big book but were curious about its themes and philosophical consequences. (35–36).
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  23. Barry R. Gross (1994). What Could A Feminist Science Be? The Monist 77 (4):434-444.score: 30.0
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  24. Steven A. Gross (2005). Linguistic Understanding and Belief. Mind 114 (453):61-66.score: 30.0
    Comment on Dean Pettit, who replies in same issue.
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  25. Jeffrey Maynes & Steven Gross (2013). Linguistic Intuitions. Philosophy Compass 8 (8):714-730.score: 30.0
    Linguists often advert to what are sometimes called linguistic intuitions. These intuitions and the uses to which they are put give rise to a variety of philosophically interesting questions: What are linguistic intuitions – for example, what kind of attitude or mental state is involved? Why do they have evidential force and how might this force be underwritten by their causal etiology? What light might their causal etiology shed on questions of cognitive architecture – for example, as a case study (...)
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  26. Rita M. Gross (2010). Review of Charles Goodman, Consequences of Compassion: An Interpretation and Defense of Buddhist Ethics. [REVIEW] Sophia 49 (2):311-313.score: 30.0
  27. Steven Gross (2005). Context-Sensitive Truth-Theoretic Accounts of Semantic Competence. Mind and Language 20 (1):68–102.score: 30.0
    According to cognitivist truth-theoretic accounts of semantic competence, aspects of our linguistic behavior can be explained by ascribing to speakers cognition of truth theories. It's generally assumed on this approach that, however much context sensitivity speakers' languages contain, the cognized truththeories themselves can be adequately characterized context insensitively—that is, without using in the metalanguage expressions whose semantic value can vary across occasions of utterance. In this paper, I explore some of the motivations for and problems and consequences of dropping this (...)
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  28. Steven Gross (2006). Can Empirical Theories of Semantic Competence Really Help Limn the Structure of Reality? Noûs 40 (1):43–81.score: 30.0
    There is a long tradition of drawing metaphysical conclusions from investigations into language. This paper concerns one contemporary variation on this theme: the alleged ontological significance of cognitivist truth-theoretic accounts of semantic competence. According to such accounts, human speakers’ linguistic behavior is in part empirically explained by their cognizing a truth-theory. Such a theory consists of a finite number of axioms assigning semantic values to lexical items, a finite number of axioms assigning semantic values to complex expressions on the basis (...)
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  29. Alan G. Gross (1990). Reinventing Certainty: The Significance of Ian Hacking's Realism. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:421 - 431.score: 30.0
    This paper examines Ian Hacking's arguments in favor of entity realism. It shows that his examples from science do not support his realism. Furthermore, his proposed criterion of experimental use is neither sufficient nor necessary for conferring a privileged status on his preferred unobservables. Nonetheless his insight is genuine; it may be most profitably seen as part of a more general effort to create a space for a new form of scientific and philosophical certainty, one that does not require foundations.
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  30. Steffen W. Gross (2002). The Neglected Programme of Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (4):403-414.score: 30.0
    Aesthetics is today widely seen as the philosophy of art and/or beauty, limited to artworks and their perception. In this paper, I will argue that today's aesthetics and the original programme developed by the German Enlightenment thinker Alexander Gottlieb Baumgarten in the first half of the eighteenth century have only the name in common. Baumgarten did not primarily develop his aesthetics as a philosophy of art. The making and understanding of artworks had served in his original programme only as an (...)
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  31. Ian Evans, Don Fallis, Peter Gross, Terry Horgan, Jenann Ismael, John Pollock, Paul D. Thorn, Jacob N. Caton, Adam Arico, Daniel Sanderman, Orlin Vakerelov, Nathan Ballantyne, Matthew S. Bedke, Brian Fiala & Martin Fricke (2007). An Objectivist Argument for Thirdism. Analysis 68.score: 30.0
    Bayesians take “definite” or “single-case” probabilities to be basic. Definite probabilities attach to closed formulas or propositions. We write them here using small caps: PROB(P) and PROB(P/Q). Most objective probability theories begin instead with “indefinite” or “general” probabilities (sometimes called “statistical probabilities”). Indefinite probabilities attach to open formulas or propositions. We write indefinite probabilities using lower case “prob” and free variables: prob(Bx/Ax). The indefinite probability of an A being a B is not about any particular A, but rather about the (...)
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  32. Steven Gross, Review Origins of Human Communication.score: 30.0
    The claims are grounded in a wealth of fascinating data, particularly on primate and young child communication and social cognition, much produced by Tomasello’s own lab. But there is certainly no dearth of stimulating speculation. Tomasello’s story is rich and complex. In what follows, I focus on aspects of the three hypotheses listed above, offering some commentary as I go.
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  33. Matthias Gross (2010). The Public Proceduralization of Contingency: Bruno Latour and the Formation of Collective Experiments. Social Epistemology 24 (1):63 – 74.score: 30.0
    Social scientists have traditionally attempted to avoid extending strategies for acquiring experimental knowledge to the sphere of the social. Bruno Latour, however, has introduced a notion of the collective experiment, an experiment conducted by and with us all. In this short paper I seek to explore, by way of elucidating the talk of collective experiments, that Latour's notion has long since existed in the theory and practice of ecological design and restoration. Practitioners in ecological restoration projects find themselves in a (...)
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  34. Steven Gross (2001). Book Review. Concepts: Where Cognitive Science Went Wrong Jerry Fodor. [REVIEW] Mind 110 (438):469-475.score: 30.0
  35. Steven A. Gross (2006). Can One Sincerely Say What One Doesn't Believe? Mind and Language 21 (1):11-20.score: 30.0
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  36. Paul Gross (2007). Nuance and Honor : Religion Versus Science. In Cornelis De Waal (ed.), Susan Haack: A Lady of Distinctions: The Philosopher Responds to Critics. Prometheus Books. 191.score: 30.0
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  37. Steven Gross (2001). Essays on Linguistic Context-Sensitivity and its Philosophical Significance. Routledge.score: 30.0
    Drawing upon research in philosophical logic, linguistics and cognitive science, this study explores how our ability to use and understand language depends upon our capacity to keep track of complex features of the contexts in which we converse.
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  38. Steven Gross (2005). The Biconditional Doctrine: Contra Kölbel on a “Dogma” of Davidsonian Semantics. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 62 (2):189 - 210.score: 30.0
    Should a theory of meaning state what sentences mean, and can a Davidsonian theory of meaning in particular do so? Max Kölbel answers both questions affirmatively. I argue, however, that the phenomena of non-homophony, non-truth-conditional aspects of meaning, semantic mood, and context-sensitivity provide prima facie obstacles for extending Davidsonian truth-theories to yield meaning-stating theorems. Assessing some natural moves in reply requires a more fully developed conception of the task of such theories than Kölbel provides. A more developed conception is also (...)
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  39. Steven Gross (2001). Review of What's Within? Nativism Reconsidered. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 110 (1):91-94.score: 30.0
    Fiona Cowie’s _What’s Within_ consists of three parts. In the first, she examines the early modern rationalist- empiricist debate over nativism, isolating what she considers the two substantive “strands” (67)1 that truly separated them: whether there exist domain-specific learning mechanisms, and whether concept acquisition is amenable to naturalistic explanation. She then turns, in the book’s succeeding parts, to where things stand today with these issues. The second part argues that Jerry Fodor’s view of concepts is continuous with traditional nativism in (...)
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  40. Marcelo Dascal & Alan G. Gross (1999). The Marriage of Pragmatics and Rhetoric. Philosophy and Rhetoric 32 (2):107-130.score: 30.0
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  41. Michael L. Gross (2002). Abortion and Neonaticide: Ethics, Practice and Policy in Four Nations. Bioethics 16 (3):202–230.score: 30.0
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  42. Alan G. Gross (1988). Adaptation in Evolutionary Epistemology: Clarifying Hull's Model. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 3 (2):185-186.score: 30.0
  43. Peg Brand, Myles Brand, G. E. M. Anscombe, Donald Davidson, John M. Dolan, Peter T. Geach, Thomas Nagel, Barry R. Gross, Nebojsa Kujundzic, Jon K. Mills, Stephen Lester Thompson, Richard J. McGowan, Jennifer Uleman, John D. Musselman, James S. Stramel, Parker English & Torin Alter (1995). Letters to the Editor. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 69 (2):119 - 131.score: 30.0
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  44. Hyman Gross & Ross Harrison, Causation Outside the Law.score: 30.0
    In their important book, Causation in the Law, H. L. A. Hart and Tony Honore argue that causation in the law is based on causation outside the law, that the causal principles the courts rely on to determine legal responsibility are based on distinctions exercised in ordinary causal judgments. A distinction that particularly concerns them is one that divides factors that are necessary or sine qua non for an effect into those that count as causes for purposes of legal responsibility (...)
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  45. Michael L. Gross (2010). Teaching Military Medical Ethics: Another Look at Dual Loyalty and Triage. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (04):458-464.score: 30.0
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  46. Steven Gross (2007). Trivalent Semantics and the Vaguely Vague. Synthese 156 (1):97-117.score: 30.0
    Michael Tye responds to the problem of higher-order vagueness for his trivalent semantics by maintaining that truth-value predicates are “vaguely vague”: it’s indeterminate, on his view, whether they have borderline cases and therefore indeterminate whether every sentence is true, false, or indefinite. Rosanna Keefe objects (1) that Tye’s argument for this claim tacitly assumes that every sentence is true, false, or indefinite, and (2) that the conclusion is any case not viable. I argue – contra (1) – that Tye’s argument (...)
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  47. Michael L. Gross (2004). Doctors in the Decent Society: Torture, Ill-Treatment and Civic Duty. Bioethics 18 (2):181–203.score: 30.0
  48. Neil Gross (1997). Durkheim's Pragmatism Lectures: A Contextual Interpretation. Sociological Theory 15 (2):126-149.score: 30.0
    This article attempts to understand Emile Durkheim's 1913-14 lectures on pragmatism and sociology by situating them in the socio-intellectual context of the time. An analysis of books and journal articles from the period reveals that the ideas of the Anglo-American pragmatic philosophers Charles Peirce, William James, John Dewey, and F.C.S. Schiller were very popular in pre-World War I France. The French term le pragmatisme, however, was used to refer not only to the thought of these philosophers, but also to the (...)
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  49. Alan G. Gross (1994). Is a Science of Language Possible? The Derrida-Searle Debate. Social Epistemology 8 (4):345 – 359.score: 30.0
  50. David Gross (1985). Bergson, Proust, and the Revaluation of Memory. International Philosophical Quarterly 25 (4):369-380.score: 30.0
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