Search results for 'Lord Cromer' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  4
    Lord Cromer (1910). VI. History and Politics. The Classical Review 24 (04):114-116.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Wilberforce Lord (1985). The Academics and Lord Denning. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 5 (3).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  6
    J. Gow (1906). Burghclere's and Cromer's Classical Translations The Georgics of Virgil. Translated Into English Verse by Lord Burghclere. London: Murray, 1904. Sq. 8vo. Pp. 195. 10s. 6d. Paraphrases and Translations From the Greek. By the Earl of Cromer. London: Macmillan, 1905. 8vo. Pp. 215. 5s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 20 (01):62-63.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Alan H. Cromer (1993). Uncommon Sense: The Heretical Nature of Science. Oxford University Press.
    Most people believe that science arose as a natural end-product of our innate intelligence and curiosity, as an inevitable stage in human intellectual development. But physicist and educator Alan Cromer disputes this belief. Cromer argues that science is not the natural unfolding of human potential, but the invention of a particular culture, Greece, in a particular historical period. Indeed, far from being natural, scientific thinking goes so far against the grain of conventional human thought that if it hadn't (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  5.  12
    Alan H. Cromer (1997). Connected Knowledge: Science, Philosophy, and Education. Oxford University Press.
    When physicist Alan Sokal recently submitted an article to the postmodernist journal Social Text, the periodical's editors were happy to publish it--for here was a respected scientist offering support for the journal's view that science is a subjective, socially constructed discipline. But as Sokal himself soon revealed in Lingua Franca magazine, the essay was a spectacular hoax--filled with scientific gibberish anyone with a basic knowledge of physics should have caught--and the academic world suddenly awoke to the vast gap that has (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  6.  4
    Rev Daniel A. Lord (1928). We Practice What You Preach. Modern Schoolman 4 (8):123-124.
    The December 1927 issue of the SCHOOLMAN contained Father Lord's forceful statements contending that philosophers could do nothing more conducive to their scholastic success than give forth again the philosophy they had assimilated by writing it out. The present vivid story is proof that Father Lord himself had "practiced what he preaches," for he wrote it during his own philosophate career. It is through the kind permission of the Editor of America, that this article appears in our magazine.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Carnes Lord (ed.) (1985). The Politics. University of Chicago Press.
    This new translation of one of the fundamental texts of Western political thought combines strict fidelity to Aristotle's Greek with a contemporary English prose style. Lord's intention throughout is to retain Aristotle's distinctive style. The accompanying notes provide literary and historical references, call attention to textual problems, and supply other essential information and interpretation. A glossary supplies working definitions of key terms in Aristotle's philosophical-political vocabulary as well as a guide to linguistic relationships that are not always reflected in (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8. Barry Lord & Gail Dexter Lord (2010). Artists, Patrons, and the Public: Why Culture Changes. Altamira Press.
    Barry Lord and Gail Dexter Lord focus their two lifetimes of international experience working in the cultural sector on the challenging questions of why and how culture changes. The answer is a dynamic and fascinating discourse that sets aesthetic culture in its material, physical, social, and political context, illuminating the primary role of the artist and the essential role of patronage in supporting the artist, from our ancient origins to the knowledge economy culture of today.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Carnes Lord (ed.) (2013). Aristotle's "Politics": Second Edition. University of Chicago Press.
    One of the fundamental works of Western political thought, Aristotle’s masterwork is the first systematic treatise on the science of politics. For almost three decades, Carnes Lord’s justly acclaimed translation has served as the standard English edition. Widely regarded as the most faithful to both the original Greek and Aristotle’s distinctive style, it is also written in clear, contemporary English. This new edition of the _Politics _retains and adds to Lord’s already extensive notes, clarifying the flow of Aristotle’s (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Errol Lord (2013). From Independence to Conciliationism: An Obituary. Australasian Journal of Philosophy (2):1-13.
    Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Volume 92, Issue 2, Page 365-377, June 2014.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  11. Errol Lord (2014). The Coherent and the Rational. Analytic Philosophy 54 (4):151-175.
  12. Errol Lord (forthcoming). Epistemic Reasons, Evidence, and Defeaters. In Daniel Star (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Reasons and Normativity. Oxford University Press
    The post-Gettier literature contained many views that tried to solve the Gettier problem by appealing to the notion of defeat. Unfortunately, all of these views are false. The failure of these views greatly contributed to a general distrust of reasons in epistemology. However, reasons are making a comeback in epistemology, both in general and in the context of the Gettier problem. There are two main aims of this paper. First, I will argue against a natural defeat based resolution of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Errol Lord (2015). Acting for the Right Reasons, Abilities, and Obligation. In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics, vol. 10. Oxford University Press
    Objectivists about obligation hold that obligations are determined by all of the normatively relevant facts. Perspectivalists, on the other hand, hold that only facts within one's perspective can determine what we are obligated to do. In this paper I argue for a perspectivalist view. On my view, what you are obligated to do is determined by the normative reasons you possess. My argument for my view is anchored in the thought that our obligations have to be action-guiding in a certain (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14. Errol Lord (2013). The Real Symmetry Problem(s) for Wide-Scope Accounts of Rationality. Philosophical Studies (3):1-22.
    You are irrational when you are akratic. On this point most agree. Despite this agreement, there is a tremendous amount of disagreement about what the correct explanation of this data is. Narrow-scopers think that the correct explanation is that you are violating a narrow-scope conditional requirement. You lack an intention to x that you are required to have given the fact that you believe you ought to x. Wide-scopers disagree. They think that a conditional you are required to make true (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  15. Errol Lord (2008). Dancy on Acting for the Right Reason. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy (3):1-7.
    It is a truism that agents can do the right action for the right reason. To put the point in terms more familiar to ethicists, it is a truism that one’s motivating reason can be one’s normative reason. In this short note, I will argue that Jonathan Dancy’s preferred view about how this is possible faces a dilemma. Dancy has the choice between accounting for two plausible constraints while at the same time holding an outlandish philosophy of mind by his (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  16. Catherine Lord (1991). A Note on Ruth Lorand's ‘Free and Dependent Beauty: A Puzzling Issue’. British Journal of Aesthetics 31 (2):167-168.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17. Errol Lord (2010). Having Reasons and the Factoring Account. Philosophical Studies 149 (3):283 - 296.
    It’s natural to say that when it’s rational for me to φ, I have reasons to φ. That is, there are reasons for φ-ing, and moreover, I have some of them. Mark Schroeder calls this view The Factoring Account of the having reasons relation. He thinks The Factoring Account is false. In this paper, I defend The Factoring Account. Not only do I provide intuitive support for the view, but I also defend it against Schroeder’s criticisms. Moreover, I show that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  18.  79
    Errol Lord (2011). Violating Requirements, Exiting From Requirements, and the Scope of Rationality. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (243):392-399.
    It is generally agreed that many types of attitudinal incoherence are irrational, but there is controversy about why they are. Some think incoherence is irrational because it violates certain wide-scope conditional requirements, others (‘narrow-scopers’) that it violates narrow-scope conditional requirements. In his paper ‘The Scope of Rational Requirements’, John Brunero has offered a putative counter-example to narrow-scope views. But a narrow-scoper should reject a crucial assumption which Brunero makes, namely, the claim that we always violate conditional narrow-scope requirements when we (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  19. Catherine Lord (1987). Indexicality, Not Circularity: Dickie's New Definition of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 45 (3):229-232.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20.  25
    Errol Lord (2015). Review: Nomy Arpaly and Timothy Schroeder, In Praise of Desire. [REVIEW] Ethics 125 (2):562-567,.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. G. L. Huxley & A. B. Lord (1962). The Singer of Tales. Journal of Hellenic Studies 82:149.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   39 citations  
  22.  35
    Timothy C. Lord (1992). The Ideology of the Aesthetic (Review). Philosophy and Literature 16 (2):374-376.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  25
    Andrew Huddleston & E. Lord, Clear Eyes, Full Hearts, Can't Lose: Friday Night Lights and the Value of Inspiration.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  6
    Catherine Lord (forthcoming). Why Do We Take Serious Art Seriously? Journal of Aesthetic Education.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25.  51
    Catherine Lord (1985). A Gricean Approach to Aesthetic Instrumentalism. British Journal of Aesthetics 25 (1):66-70.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  50
    Catherine Lord (1980). Convention and Dickie's Institutional Theory of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 20 (4):322-328.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27.  49
    Carnes Lord (1981). The Character and Composition of Aristotle's Politics. Political Theory 9 (4):459-478.
  28.  10
    Mary Louise Lord (2002). Benvenuto da Imola's Literary Approach to Virgil's Eclogues. Mediaeval Studies 64 (1):287-362.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Beth Lord (2011). Kant and Spinozism: Transcendental Idealism and Immanence From Jacobi to Deleuze. Palgrave Macmillan.
  30.  16
    Mary Louise Lord (1992). Virgil's Eclogues, Nicholas Trevet, and the Harmony of the Spheres. Mediaeval Studies 54 (1):186-273.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  38
    Carnes Lord (1982). Education and Culture in the Political Thought of Aristotle. Cornell University Press.
  32. Beth Lord (2010). Spinoza's Ethics. Indiana University Press.
    Baruch Spinoza was born in Amsterdam during a period of unprecedented scientific, artistic, and intellectual discovery. Upon its release, Spinoza’s Ethics was banned; today it is the quintessential example of philosophical method. Although acknowledged as difficult, the book is widely taught in philosophy, literature, history, and politics. This introduction is designed to be read side by side with Spinoza's work. As a guide to the style, vocabulary, and arguments of the Ethics, it offers a range of interpretive possibilities to prepare (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33.  16
    Beth Lord (2014). Spinoza and German Idealism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (1):178-181.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  25
    Lisa DeMarni Cromer, Jennifer J. Freyd, Angela K. Binder, Anne P. DePrince & Kathryn Becker-Blease (2006). What's the Risk in Asking? Participant Reaction to Trauma History Questions Compared with Reaction to Other Personal Questions. Ethics and Behavior 16 (4):347 – 362.
    Does asking about trauma history create participant distress? If so, how does it compare with reactions to other personal questions? Do participants consider trauma questions important compared to other personal questions? Using 2 undergraduate samples (Ns = 240 and 277), the authors compared participants' reactions to trauma questions with their reactions to other possibly invasive questions through a self-report survey. Trauma questions caused relatively minimal distress and were perceived as having greater importance and greater cost-benefit ratings compared to other kinds (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35.  28
    Beth Lord (2011). 'Disempowered by Nature': Spinoza on The Political Capabilities of Women. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (6):1085 - 1106.
    This paper examines Spinoza's remarks on women in the Political Treatise in the context of his views in the Ethics about human community and similitude. Although these remarks appear to exclude women from democratic participation on the basis of essential incapacities, I aim to show that Spinoza intended these remarks not as true statements, but as prompts for critical consideration of the place of women in the progressive democratic polity. In common with other scholars, I argue that women, in Spinoza's (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  1
    John Mullarkey & Beth Lord (eds.) (2009). The Continuum Companion to Continental Philosophy. Continuum.
    The Continuum Companion to Continental Philosophy offers the definitive guide to contemporary continental thought.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37.  13
    Beth Lord, What Can We Do with Spinoza?
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  18
    Timothy C. Lord (2011). Anti-Realism in R. G. Collingwood's Theory of Art as Imagination. Idealistic Studies 41 (1-2):45-54.
    Aaron Ridley has concluded that “Collingwood’s global Idealism is really only a distraction from the much more important and interesting ideas that constitute his aesthetics.” My paper takes issue with this conclusion. Collingwood’s idealism is an integral part of his aesthetics, and it simply cannot be shucked off, leaving his aesthetics untouched and intact. A careful reading of Collingwood’s oeuvre in aesthetics reveals that it is his long-standing antipathy to realism that grounds both his critique of pseudo-art and his own (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  26
    Beth Lord (2011). Spinoza and the Specters of Modernity: The Hidden Enlightenment of Diversity From Spinoza to Freud. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):339-342.
    (2011). Spinoza and the Specters of Modernity: The Hidden Enlightenment of Diversity from Spinoza to Freud. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 19, No. 2, pp. 339-342.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  23
    Tim Lord (2012). Collingwood and the Sea Anemone. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 17 (1):117-134.
    R.G. Collingwood's An Essay on Metaphysics is a full-fledged response toA.J.Ayer's Language, Truth and Logic. Ayer's book forced Collingwood to revisit his critique of realism, to respond to the 'scientific dogmatism' of logical positivism, and to modify his own idealist metaphysical views in new and unprecedented ways. This article argues that Collingwood's critique of Ayer provides the impetus for the later metaphysical theory of An Essay on Metaphysics. Part I delineates Collingwood's critique of realism as a 'sea anemone view of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  4
    John K. Lord (1889). Livius XXI xxiii. Mit verweisungen auf cäsars bellum gallieum, für die bedürfnisse der schule grammatisch untersucht Von dr Franz fügner. Berlin 1888. Pp. 160. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 3 (05):213-214.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  4
    Louis E. Lord (1927). Note on Tacitus' Summary of the Reign of Augustus. The Classical Review 41 (04):121-122.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Timothy C. Lord (2006). RG Collingwood, An Essay on Philosophical Method Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 26 (4):246-248.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  9
    Catherine Lord (1967). Unity with Impunity. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 26 (1):103-106.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  13
    Beth Lord, Against the Fanaticism of Forces : Kant's Critique of Herder's Spinozism.
  46.  8
    Richard D. Lord (1990). Shakespeare and the Dramaturgy of Power (Review). Philosophy and Literature 14 (1):225-225.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  21
    Janet E. Lord, David Suozzi & Allyn L. Taylor (2010). Lessons From the Experience of U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: Addressing the Democratic Deficit in Global Health Governance. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (3):564-579.
    This article reviews the contributions of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities to the progressive development of both international human rights law and global health law and governance. It provides a summary of the global situation of persons with disabilities and outlines the progressive development of international disability standards, noting the salience of the shift from a medical model of disability to a rights-based social model reflected in the CRPD. Thereafter, the article considers the Convention's structure (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  4
    J. Raymond Lord (2006). An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine [1845]. Newman Studies Journal 3 (2):104-106.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  16
    Beth Lord (2012). Spinoza on Human Freedom: Reason, Autonomy, and the Good Life. By Matthew J. Kisner. (Cambridge UP, 2011. Pp. Xi + 261. Price £50.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 62 (246):206-208.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  3
    Richard D. Lord (1957). Frost and Cyclicism. Renascence 10 (1):31-31.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000