Search results for 'Lorna Burns' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lorna Burns (2010). Becoming-Bertha: Virtual Difference and Repetition in Postcolonial 'Writing Back', a Deleuzian Reading of Jean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea. Deleuze Studies 4 (1):16-41.score: 240.0
    Critical responses to Wide Sargasso Sea have seized upon Rhys's novel as an exemplary model of writing back. Looking beyond the actual repetitions which recall Brontë’s text, I explore Rhys's novel as an expression of virtual difference and becomings that exemplify Deleuze's three syntheses of time. Elaborating the processes of becoming that Deleuze's third synthesis depicts, Antoinette's fate emerges not as a violence against an original identity. Rather, what the reader witnesses is a series of becomings or masks, some of (...)
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  2. Lorna Burns (2012). Contemporary Caribbean Writing and Deleuze: Literature Between Postcolonialism and Post-Continental Philosophy. Continuum.score: 240.0
    Introduction: How newness enters the world -- Surrealism and the Caribbean: a curious line of resemblance -- Writing back to the colonial event: Derek Walcott and Wilson Harris -- Édouard Glissant's poetics of the chaosmos -- Postcolonial literature as health: Robert Antoni and Nalo Hopkinson.
     
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  3. Walter J. Freeman & J. Burns (1996). Societies of Brains: Walter Freeman in Conversation with Jean Burns. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (2):172-180.score: 180.0
    [opening paragraph]: Walter Freeman discusses with Jean Burns some of the issues relating to consciousness in his recent book. Burns: To understand consciousness we need know its relationship to the brain, and to do that we need to know how the brain processes information. A lot of people think of brain processing in terms of individual neurons, and you're saying that brain processing should be understood in terms of dynamical states of populations?
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  4. J. H. Burns (1999). Bibliography of the Writings of JH Burns 1950-1998. History of Political Thought 20:7-20.score: 180.0
     
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  5. C. Delisle Burns (1932). Book Review:Modern Civilization on Trial. C. Delisle Burns. [REVIEW] Ethics 42 (2):213-.score: 150.0
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  6. Jean E. Burns (2012). The Action of Consciousness and the Uncertainty Principle. Journal of Nonlocality 1 (1).score: 60.0
    The term action of consciousness is used to refer to an influence, such as psychokinesis or free will, that produces an effect on matter that is correlated to mental intention, but not completely determined by physical conditions. Such an action could not conserve energy. But in that case, one wonders why, when highly accurate measurements are done, occasions of non-conserved energy (generated perhaps by unconscious PK) are not detected. A possible explanation is that actions of consciousness take place within the (...)
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  7. [deleted]Stacy Lee Burns (2012). Harold Garfinkel: Memorial Remarks, Recollections and Reflections. [REVIEW] Human Studies 35 (2):159-161.score: 60.0
    Harold Garfinkel: Memorial Remarks, Recollections and Reflections Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s10746-012-9216-2 Authors Stacy Lee Burns, Loyola Marymount University, University Hall, One LMU Drive, Suite 4341, Los Angeles, CA 90045-2659, USA Journal Human Studies Online ISSN 1572-851X Print ISSN 0163-8548.
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  8. Chester R. Burns (ed.) (1977). Legacies in Ethics and Medicine. Science History Publications.score: 60.0
    Burns, C. R. Introduction.--Antiquity: Margalith, D. The ideal doctor as depicted in ancient Hebrew writings. Edelstein, L. The Hippocratic oath. Edelstein, L. The professional ethics of the Greek physician. Michler, M. Medical ethics in Hippocratic bone surgery. Maas, P. L., Oliver, J. H. An ancient poem on the duties of a physician.--The medieval era: Levey, M. Medical deontology in ninth century Islam. Bar-Sela, A., Hoff, H. E. Isaac Israeli's fifty admonitions of the physicians. Rosner, F. The physician's prayer attributed (...)
     
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  9. Prue Burns & Jan Schapper (2008). The Ethical Case for Affirmative Action. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):369 - 379.score: 30.0
    Affirmative action has been a particularly contentious policy issue that has polarised contributions to the debate. Over recent times in most western countries, support for affirmative action has, however, been largely snuffed out or beaten into retreat and replaced by the concept of ‹diversity management’. Thus, any contemporary study that examines the development of affirmative action would suggest that its opponents have won the battle. Nonetheless, this article argues that because the battle has been won on dubious ethical grounds it (...)
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  10. Elizabeth Burns & Michael Lacewing (2004). Essay Writing and Exam Preparation. In Elizabeth Burns & Stephen Law (eds.), Philosophy for as and A. Routledge.score: 30.0
  11. Jean E. Burns (2010). What Does the Mind Do That the Brain Does Not? In R. L. Amoroso (ed.), The Complementarity of Mind and Body: Fulfilling the Dream of Descartes, Einstein and Eccles. Nova Science.score: 30.0
    Two forms of independent action by consciousness have been proposed by various researchers – free will and holistic processing. (Holistic processing contributes to the formation of behavior through the holistic use of brain programs and encoding.) The well-known experiment of Libet et al. (1983) implies that if free will exists, its action must consist of making a selection among alternatives presented by the brain. As discussed herein, this result implies that any physical changes mind can produce in the brain are (...)
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  12. Jean E. Burns (1998). Entropy and Vacuum Radiation. Foundations of Physics 28 (7):1191-1207.score: 30.0
    It is shown that entropy increase in thermodynamic systems can plausibly be accounted for by the random action of vacuum radiation. A recent calculation by Rueda using stochastic electrodynamics (SED) shows that vacuum radiation causes a particle to undergo a rapid Brownian motion about its average dynamical trajectory. It is shown that the magnitude of spatial drift calculated by Rueda can also be predicted by assuming that the average magnitudes of random shifts in position and momentum of a particle correspond (...)
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  13. J. H. Burns (2005). Happiness and Utility: Jeremy Bentham's Equation. Utilitas 17 (1):46-61.score: 30.0
    Doubts about the origin of Bentham's formula, ‘the greatest happiness of the greatest number’, were resolved by Robert Shackleton thirty years ago. Uncertainty has persisted on at least two points. (1) Why did the phrase largely disappear from Bentham's writing for three or four decades after its appearance in 1776? (2) Is it correct to argue (with David Lyons in 1973) that Bentham's principle is to be differentially interpreted as having sometimes a ‘parochial’ and sometimes a ‘universalist’ bearing? These issues (...)
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  14. Jean E. Burns (2007). Vacuum Radiation, Entropy, and Molecular Chaos. Foundations of Physics 37 (12):1727-1737.score: 30.0
    Vacuum radiation causes a particle to make a random walk about its dynamical trajectory. In this random walk the root mean square change in spatial coordinate is proportional to t 1/2, and the fractional changes in momentum and energy are proportional to t −1/2, where t is time. Thus the exchange of energy and momentum between a particle and the vacuum tends to zero over time. At the end of a mean free path the fractional change in momentum of a (...)
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  15. Jean E. Burns (1991). Does Consciousness Perform a Function Independently of the Brain? Frontier Perspectives, Center for Frontier Sciences, Temple University 2 (1):19-34.score: 30.0
    Even if all of the content of conscious experience is encoded in the brain, there is a considerable difference between the view that consciousness does independent processing and the view that it does not. If all processing is done by the brain, then conscious experience is unnecessary and irrelevant to behavior. If consciousness performs a function, then its association with particular aspects of brain processing reflect its functional use in determining behavior. However, if consciousness does perform a function, it cannot (...)
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  16. J. H. Burns (1959). Utilitarianism and Democracy. Philosophical Quarterly 9 (35):168-171.score: 30.0
  17. Steven Burns & Alice MacLachlan (2004). Getting It: On Jokes and Art. AE: Journal of the Canadian Society of Aesthetics 10.score: 30.0
    “What is appreciation?” is a basic question in the philosophy of art, and the analogy between appreciating a work of art and getting a joke can help us answer it. We first propose a subjective account of aesthetic appreciation (I). Then we consider jokes (II). The difference between getting a joke and not, or what it is to get it right, can often be objectively articulated. Such explanations cannot substitute for the joke itself, and indeed may undermine the very power (...)
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  18. Jean E. Burns (1996). The Possibility of Empirical Test of Hypotheses About Consciousness. In S. R. Hameroff, A. W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Towards a Science of Consciousness. MIT Press. 739--742.score: 30.0
    The possibility of empirical test is discussed with respect to three issues: (1) What is the ontological relationship between consciousness and the brain/physical world? (2) What physical characteristics are associated with the mind/brain interface? (3) Can consciousness act on the brain independently of any brain process?
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  19. Elizabeth Burns (2011). What Happens After Pascal's Wager: Living Faith and Rational Belief – Daniel Garber. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (242):218-220.score: 30.0
  20. Elizabeth Burns (1997). Iris Murdoch and the Nature of Good. Religious Studies 33 (3):303-313.score: 30.0
    Iris Murdoch's concept of Good is a central feature of her moral theory; in Murdoch's thought, attention to the Good is the primary means of improving our moral conduct. Her view has been criticised on the grounds that the Good is irrelevant to life in this world (Don Cupitt), that the notion of a transcendent, single object of attention is incoherent (Stewart Sutherland), and that we can only understand what goodness is if we see it as an attribute of a (...)
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  21. Lawrence Burns (2008). Identifying Concrete Ethical Demands in the Face of the Abstract Other: Emmanuel Levinas' Pragmatic Ethics. Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (3):315-335.score: 30.0
    Critics of Levinas reject the notion that the abstract face of the other can ground ethics and generate specific responsibilities. To the contrary, I argue that the face does ground a practical and pragmatic ethics. Drawing on Levinas' phenomenological analyses of the enjoying subject, I show that the face communicates an imperative to the subject that obligates her or him to repair the concrete context of action in which the subject encounters the other. My elucidation takes very seriously the notion (...)
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  22. Tom R. Burns (2006). The Sociology of Complex Systems: An Overview of Actor-System-Dynamics Theory. World Futures 62 (6):411 – 440.score: 30.0
    This article illustrates the important scientific role that a systems approach might play within the social sciences and humanities, above all through its contribution to a common language, shared conceptualizations, and theoretical integration in the face of the extreme (and growing) fragmentation among the social sciences (and between the social sciences and the natural sciences). The article outlines a systems theoretic approach, actor-system-dynamics (ASD), whose authors have strived to re-establish systems theorizing in the social sciences (after a period of marginalization (...)
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  23. Jean E. Burns (2002). Quantum Fluctuations and the Action of the Mind. Noetic Journal 3 (4):312-317.score: 30.0
    It is shown that if mental influence can change a position or momentum coordinate within the limits of the uncertainty principle, such change, when magnified by a single interaction, is sufficient to order the direction of traveling molecules. Mental influence could initiate an action potential in the brain through this process by using the impact of ordered molecules to open the gates of sodium channels in neuronal membranes. It is shown that about 80 ordered molecules, traveling at thermal velocity in (...)
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  24. Jean E. Burns (2006). The Arrow of Time and the Action of the Mind at the Molecular Level. In Daniel P. Sheehan (ed.), Frontiers of Time. American Inst. Of Physics.score: 30.0
    A new event is defined as an intervention in the time reversible dynamical trajectories of particles in a system. New events are then assumed to be quantum fluctuations in the spatial and momentum coordinates, and mental action is assumed to work by ordering such fluctuations. It is shown that when the cumulative values of such fluctuations in a mean free path of a molecule are magnified by molecular interaction at the end of that path, the momentum of a molecule can (...)
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  25. Jean E. Burns (1999). Volition and Physical Laws. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (10):27-47.score: 30.0
    The concept of free will is central to our lives, as we make day-to-day decisions, and to our culture, in our ethical and legal systems. The very concept implies that what we choose can produce a change in our physical environment, whether by pressing a switch to turn out electric lights or choosing a long-term plan of action which can affect many people. Yet volition is not a part of presently known physical laws and it is not even known whether (...)
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  26. Anthony P. Atkinson, I. S. Baker, Susan J. Blackmore, William Braud, Jean E. Burns, R. H. S. Carpenter, Christopher J. S. Clarke, Ralph D. Ellis, David Fontana, Christopher C. French, D. Radin, M. Schlitz, Stefan Schmidt & Max Velmans (2005). Open Peer Commentary on 'the Sense of Being Stared At' Parts 1 &. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (6):50-116.score: 30.0
  27. Anthony Burns (2011). Conceptual History and the Philosophy of the Later Wittgenstein: A Critique of Quentin Skinners Contextualist Method. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (1):54-83.score: 30.0
    Although first published in 1969, the methodological views advanced in Quentin Skinner's “Meaning and Understanding in the History of Ideas” remain relevant today. In his article Skinner suggests that it would be inappropriate to even attempt to write the history of any idea or concept. In support of this view, Skinner advances two arguments, one derived from the philosophy of the later Wittgenstein and the other from that of J. L. Austin. In this paper I focus on the first of (...)
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  28. Kelly A. Burns (2008). Warren's Ecofeminist Ethics and Merleau-Ponty's Body-Subject: Intersections. Ethics and the Environment 13 (2):pp. 101-118.score: 30.0
    While Karen Warren offers an ecofeminist ethic that is pluralistic, contextualist, and challenges Cartesian dualism, one area that remains underdeveloped in her theory is embodiment. I will examine Merleau-Ponty’s notion of embodied subjectivity and show that it would fit consistently with her theory. I will also explore some other areas in which the two theories supplement each other.
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  29. Elizabeth Burns & Stephen Law (eds.) (2004). Philosophy for as and A. Routledge.score: 30.0
    Philosophy for AS and A2 is the definitive textbook for students of Advanced Subsidiary or Advanced Level courses, structured directly around the specification of the AQA - the only exam board to offer these courses. Following a lively foreword by Nigel Warburton, author of Philosophy: The Basics , a team of experienced teachers devote a chapter each to the six themes covered by the syllabus: AS * Theory of Knowledge * Moral Philosophy * Philosophy of Religion A2 * Philosophy of (...)
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  30. Jean E. Burns (2003). What is Beyond the Edge of the Known World? Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (6-7):7-28.score: 30.0
    Experiments show that psi differs from known physical processes in a variety of ways, and these differences are described herein. Because of these, psi cannot be accounted for in terms of presently known physical laws. A number of theories, of which we review a sampling, suggest ways in which known physical laws might be expanded in order to account for psi. However, there is no agreement on which of these theories, if any, will ultimately provide a general explanation. A further (...)
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  31. C. Delisle Burns (1915). Occam's Razor. Mind 24 (96):592.score: 30.0
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  32. Robert M. Burns (2006). Collingwood, Bradley, and Historical Knowledge. History and Theory 45 (2):178–203.score: 30.0
    The central feature of the narrative structure of Collingwood’s The Idea of History is the pivotal role accorded to Bradley, evident in the table of contents and in the two discussions of him. Few readers have noticed that, confusingly, the book’s first discussion of Bradley is a revision of the Inaugural Lecture “The Historical Imagination,” which constitutes the book’s second discussion of Bradley . The differences between these two presentations of Bradley are significant. The 1935 account seeks to portray the (...)
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  33. Elizabeth Burns (2009). Must Theists Believe in a Personal God? Think 8 (23):77-86.score: 30.0
    The claim that God is a person or personal is, perhaps, one of the most fundamental claims which religious believers make about God. In Hinduism, Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva are represented in person-like form. In the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament God walks in the Garden of Eden , experiences emotions , and converses with human beings . In the New Testament, God communicates with his people, usually by means of angels or visions , and retains the ability to speak audibly, as (...)
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  34. R. M. Burns (1988). The Agent Intellect in Rahner and Aquinas. Heythrop Journal 29 (4):423–449.score: 30.0
  35. Frederic Gilbert, Lawrence Burns & Timothy Krahn (2011). The Inheritance, Power and Predicaments of the “Brain-Reading” Metaphor. Medicine Studies 2 (4):229-244.score: 30.0
    Purpose With the increasing sophistication of neuroimaging technologies in medicine, new language is being sought to make sense of the findings. The aim of this paper is to explore whether the brain-reading metaphor used to convey current medical or neurobiological findings imports unintended significations that do not necessarily reflect the genuine findings made by physicians and neuroscientists. Methods First, the paper surveys the ambiguities of the readability metaphor, drawing from the history of science and medicine, paying special attention to the (...)
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  36. Robert M. Burns (1998). Divine Infinity in Thomas Aquinas: I. Philosophico-Theological Background. Heythrop Journal 39 (1):57–69.score: 30.0
    A reassessment of Aquinas’s doctrine of divine infinity, particularly in the light of the previous history of the concept within Western philosophy and theology. From the critical perspective provided by this history the central place which has been claimed for it in Aquinas’s thinking is questioned, as are also its originality and coherence. The notion that the doctrine of divine infinity was introduced to Western thought by Judaeo‐Christianity is rejected; from Anaximander onwards it had been a central concept in Greek (...)
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  37. Teresa McCormack & Patrick Burns (2011). Temporal Information and Children's and Adults' Causal Inferences. Thinking and Reasoning 15 (2):167-196.score: 30.0
    Three experiments examined whether children and adults would use temporal information as a cue to the causal structure of a three-variable system, and also whether their judgements about the effects of interventions on the system would be affected by the temporal properties of the event sequence. Participants were shown a system in which two events B and C occurred either simultaneously (synchronous condition) or in a temporal sequence (sequential condition) following an initial event A. The causal judgements of adults and (...)
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  38. J. Patout Burns (1988). Augustine on the Origin and Progress of Evil. Journal of Religious Ethics 16 (1):9 - 27.score: 30.0
    Augustine distinguished apparent evil, conflict and corruption among bodies from true evil, the self-initiated corruption of created spirits. Angels and humans fail to maintain the perfection of knowledge and love given by God and then turn to themselves as the focus of attention and appreciation. The original failures of both demons and humans were neither provoked nor persuaded by any outside bodily or spiritual force: each was an autonomous and self-initiated sin of pride. This fundamental evil underlies and gives (...)
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  39. Lawrence Burns (2007). Gunther Von Hagens' Body Worlds: Selling Beautiful Education. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (4):12 – 23.score: 30.0
    In the BODY WORLDS exhibitions currently touring the United States, Gunther von Hagens displays human cadavers preserved through plastination. Whole bodies are playfully posed and exposed to educate the public. However, the educational aims are ambiguous, and some aspects of the exhibit violate human dignity. In particular, the signature cards attached to the whole-body plastinates that bear the title, the signature of Gunther von Hagens, and the date of creation mark the plastinates as artwork and von Hagens as the artist (...)
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  40. Lawrence Burns, Monique Lanoix, Ryan M. Melnychuk & Bernie Pauly (2008). Race, Science and a Novel: An Interdisciplinary Dialogue. Developing World Bioethics 8 (3):226-234.score: 30.0
    We discuss how a novel can illuminate the moral dimensions of science and healthcare. The critical distance afforded by the novel pro.
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  41. J. H. Burns (ed.) (1988). The Cambridge History of Medieval Political Thought C. 350-C. 1450. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    This volume offers a comprehensive and authoritative account of the history of a complex and varied body of ideas over a period of more than one thousand years. A work of both synthesis and assessment, The Cambridge History of Medieval Political Thought presents the results of several decades of critical scholarship in the field, and reflects in its breadth of enquiry precisely that diversity of focus that characterized the medieval sense of the "political," preoccupied with universality at some levels, and (...)
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  42. Lawrence Burns (2001). Derrida and the Promise of Community. Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (6):43-53.score: 30.0
    This paper offers a critique of Derrida's deconstruction of the promise on the grounds that it does not adequately account for the ethical constitution of the promise in the pragmatic context of face-to-face dialogue. Instead, Derrida focuses on the way in which the promise opens the horizon of interpretation or readability for an indefinite community of readers. Derrida's view is explicated at length, drawing on Limited Inc, Le monolinguisme de l'autre: ou, la prosthèse d'origine, and 'Avances', the Preface to Serge (...)
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  43. Elizabeth Burns (2008). Brian Davies the Reality of God and the Problem of Evil. (London: Continuum, 2006). Pp. 264. £16.99 (Pbk). ISBN 0 8264 9241 X. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 44 (1):118-123.score: 30.0
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  44. Linda Burns (1986). Vagueness and Coherence. Synthese 68 (3):487 - 513.score: 30.0
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  45. Tanabe Hajime & Timothy Burns (2013). Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Deductive Reasoning. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 5 (2):124-149.score: 30.0
    This article introduces the first English translation of one of Tanabe’s early essays on metaphysics. It questions the relation of the universal to the particular in context of logic, phenomenology, Neo-Kantian epistemology, and classical metaphysics. Tanabe provides his reflections on the nature of the concept of universality and its constitutive relation to phenomenal particulars through critical analyses of the issue as it is discussed across various schools of philosophy including: British Empiricism, the Marburg School, the Austrian School, the Kyoto School, (...)
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  46. Susan L. Burns (2003). Before the Nation: Kokugaku and the Imagining of Community in Early Modern Japan. Duke University Press.score: 30.0
    Late Tokugawa society and the crisis of community -- Before the Kojikiden : the divine age narrative in Tokugawa Japan -- Motoori Norinaga : discovering Japan -- Ueda Akinari : history and community -- Fujitani Mitsue : the poetics off community -- Tachibana Moribe : cosmology and community -- National literature, intellectual history, and the new Kokugaku -- Conclusion : imagined Japan(s).
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  47. Elizabeth Burns (2007). The Moral Vision of Iris Murdoch. By Heather Widdows. Heythrop Journal 48 (5):846–847.score: 30.0
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  48. C. Delisle Burns (1916). William of Ockham on Continuity. Mind 25 (100):506-512.score: 30.0
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  49. C. Delisle Burns (1926). Book Review:A Grammar of Politics. H. J. Laski. [REVIEW] Ethics 36 (3):312-.score: 30.0
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  50. Paul C. Burns (1999). Augustine's Use of Sallust in the City of God. Augustinian Studies 30 (2):105-114.score: 30.0
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