Search results for 'Lorne Tepperman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lorne Tepperman (1985). Informatics and Society: Will There Be an 'Information Revolution'? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 4 (5):395 - 399.score: 240.0
    The claim that an information revolution is underway is scrutinized in this paper. Particular attention is given to the notions that new information technology will radically increase human choice and rationality in decision-making. The literature on informatics and technology is selectively reviewed in order to determine whether (1) the present use of technology seems to predict an increased choice and rationality in the future; (2) earlier technologies have had this effect; and (3) past social predictions of this type have proven (...)
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  2. Lorna R. Marsden & Lorne J. Tepperman (1985). The Migrant Wife: The Worst of All Worlds. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 4 (3):205 - 213.score: 240.0
    This study reanalyses data on migrants to Alberta, collected by Statistics Canada in a 1980 Labour Force Survey. The findings indicate that migrant men are gainers and migrant women, particularly migrant wives are the losers from such movement, even during a period of relative economic prosperity in the Province. Women's occupational status tends to improve with time spent in the new labour force. However there is a failure to return to occupational statuses enjoyed before the move. This means, first, that (...)
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  3. Thomas Pradeu (2009). Obituary: Marie-Claude Lorne (1969–2008). Biology and Philosophy 24 (3):281-282.score: 15.0
  4. R. Langton (2001). Reply to Lorne Falkenstein. Kantian Review 5 (1):64-72.score: 15.0
    In Kantian Humility I argue that, for Kant, ignorance of things in themselves is ignorance of the intrinsic properties of substances, and that this is epistemic humility, rather than idealism: some aspects of reality, the intrinsic aspects, are beyond our epistemic grasp.The interpretation draws upon what Falkenstein takes to be ‘a novel and not implausible understanding of Kant's distinction between things in themselves and appearances’ which views it as a distinction between the intrinsic and the relational. He concedes that Kant (...)
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  5. Mark T. Conard (1996). Lorne Falkenstein, Kant's Intuitionism: A Commentary on the Transcendental Aesthetic Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 16 (5):333-335.score: 15.0
  6. Andrew Brook (1998). Lorne Falkenstein, Kant's Intuitionism: A Commentary on the Transcendental Aesthetic. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28 (2):247-268.score: 15.0
     
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  7. April Oettinger (2011). Lorne Campbell, Miguel Falomir, Jennifer Fletcher, and Luke Syson, Eds., Renaissance Faces: Van Eyck to Titian. London: National Gallery Company, 2008. Pp. 304; Color Frontispiece and Many Black-and-White and Color Figures. $70. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (1):172-173.score: 15.0
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  8. Lorne Falkenstein (1998). Hume's Answer to Kant. Noûs 32 (3):331-360.score: 3.0
  9. Lorne Falkenstein (1991). Kant, Mendelssohn, Lambert, and the Subjectivity of Time. Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (2):227-251.score: 3.0
  10. Lorne D. Booker & Nick Bontis (2010). Curbing Economic Crime with RFID Enabled Currency. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 5 (1):26-37.score: 3.0
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  11. Lorne Falkenstein (2009). Hume and Baxter on Identity Over Time. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 146 (3):425 - 433.score: 3.0
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  12. Lorne Falkenstein (2003). Hume's Project in ‘the Natural History of Religion’. Religious Studies 39 (1):1-21.score: 3.0
    There are good reasons to think that at least a part of Hume's project in the ‘The natural history of religion’ was to buttress a philosophical critique of the reasonableness of religious belief undertaken in other works, and to attack a fundamentalist account of the history of religion and the foundations of morality. But there are also problems with supposing that Hume intended to achieve either of these goals. I argue that two problems in particular – accounting for Hume's neglect (...)
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  13. Lorne Falkenstein (1989). Is Perceptual Space Monadic? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 49 (June):709-713.score: 3.0
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  14. Lorne Falkenstein (2012). Hume's Seneca Reference in Dialogues 12: An Assessment of Alternatives. Hume Studies 38 (1):101-104.score: 3.0
    In section 12 of the Dialogues, Hume claimed, without reference, that Seneca had written that to know God is to worship him. His source has proven hard to find. This note identifies some possibilities and argues in favour of one of them—one that has not been recognized by recent editors of the Dialogues.
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  15. Lorne Falkenstein (2005). Condillac's Paradox. Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (4):403-435.score: 3.0
    : I argue that Condillac was committed to four mutually inconsistent propositions: that the mind is unextended, that sensations are modifications of the mind, that colours are sensations, and that colours are extended. I argue that this inconsistency was not just the blunder of a second-rate philosopher, but the consequence of a deep-seated tension in the views of early modern philosophers on the nature of the mind, sensation, and secondary qualities and that more widely studied figures, notably Condillac's contemporaries, Hume (...)
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  16. Graham Bird (1999). Review: Falkenstein, Kant's Intuitionism: A Commentary on the Transcendental Aesthetic. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (1):147 – 153.score: 3.0
    Kant's Intuitionism: A Commentary on the Transcendental Aesthetic. Lorne Falkenstein. Toronto, University of Toronto Press, 1995. pp. xxiii + 465. £45?50. ISBN 0?8020?2973?6.
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  17. Lorne Falkenstein (1989). Kant's Argument for the Non-Spatiotemporality of Things in Themselves. Kant-Studien 80 (1-4):265-283.score: 3.0
  18. Lorne Falkenstein (1994). Intuition and Construction in Berkeley's Account of Visual Space. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (1):63-84.score: 3.0
  19. Lorne S. Cummings (2000). The Financial Performance of Ethical Investment Trusts: An Australian Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 25 (1):79 - 92.score: 3.0
    This study examines whether differences in financial performance exist for investment trusts which base their portfolio selection primarily on an ethical screen, compared to indexes which incorporate a broader spectrum of investments. Results indicate that on a risk-adjusted basis there is an insignificant difference in the financial performance of these trusts against three common market benchmarks. However as to the extent of the directional effect, there does exist slightly superior financial performance by ethical trusts against their respective industry average indexes, (...)
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  20. Lorne Falkenstein (1990). Kant's Account of Sensation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (1):63 - 88.score: 3.0
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  21. Lorne Falkenstein (1998). A Double Edged Sword? Kant's Refutation of Mendelssohn's Proof of the Immortality of the Soul and its Implications for His Theory of Matter. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (4):561-588.score: 3.0
  22. Lorne Falkenstein (1997). Hume on Manners of Disposition and the Ideas of Space and Time. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 79 (2):179-201.score: 3.0
  23. Lorne Falkenstein & Giovanni B. Grandi (2003). The Role of Material Impressions in Reid's Theory of Vision: A Critique of Gideon Yaffe's “Reid on the Perception of the Visible Figure”. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 1 (2):117-133.score: 3.0
    Reid maintained that the perceptions that we obtain from the senses of smell, taste, hearing, and touch are ‘suggested’ by corresponding sensations. However, he made an exception for the sense of vision. According to Reid, our perceptions of the real figure, position, and magnitude of bodies are suggested by their visible appearances, which are not sensations but objects of perception in their own right. These visible appearances have figure, position, and magnitude, as well as ‘colour,’ and the standard view among (...)
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  24. Lorne Falkenstein (1998). Localizing Sensations: A Reply to Anthony Quinton's Trouble with Kant. Philosophy 73 (3):479-489.score: 3.0
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  25. Lorne Falkenstein (1997). Kant's Empiricism. Review of Metaphysics 50 (3):547 - 589.score: 3.0
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  26. Lorne N. Switzer & Catherine Kelly (2006). Corporate Governance Mechanisms and the Performance of Small-Cap Firms in Canada. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 2 (s 3-4):294-328.score: 3.0
    Identifying corporate governance mechanisms to improve firm performance has been at the forefront of policy discussion and research in recent years. Existing research in this area focuses on large-capitalisation firms, and has not provided much insight on smaller firms. This paper tests for the optimality of deployment of governance mechanisms for Canadian small-cap firms by estimating a simultaneous equation system that links four control mechanisms to firm performance, using recent data. The results confirm simultaneity between several governance mechanisms and Canadian (...)
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  27. Lorne Falkenstein (1991). Kant's Account of Intuition. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):165 - 193.score: 3.0
  28. Lorne Falkenstein (1990). Berkeley's Argument for Other Minds. History of Philosophy Quarterly 7 (4):431 - 440.score: 3.0
  29. Lorne Falkenstein (1997). Naturalism, Normativity, and Scepticism in Hume's Account of Belief. Hume Studies 23 (1):29-72.score: 3.0
  30. Lorne Loxterkamp (1977). Imagination. By Mary Warnock. London: Faber and Faber, 1976. Pp. 213. $25.50. Dialogue 16 (03):547-548.score: 3.0
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  31. Lorne Falkenstein (2004). Nativism and the Nature of Thought in Reid's Account of Our Knowledge of the External World. In Terence Cuneo & René van Woudenberg (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Thomas Reid. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 156--179.score: 3.0
  32. Lorne Falkenstein, Étienne Bonnot de Condillac. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 3.0
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  33. Lorne Falkenstein (2000). Reid's Account of Localization. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (2):305-328.score: 3.0
    This paper contrasts three different positions taken by 18th century British scholars on how sensations, particularly sensations of colour and touch, come to be localized in space: Berkeley’s view that we learn to localize ideas of colour by associating certain purely qualitative features of those ideas with ideas of touch and motion, Hume’s view that visual and tangible impressions are originally disposed in space, and Reid’s view that we are innately disposed to refer appearances of colour to the end of (...)
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  34. Lorne Falkenstein (2000). Hume's Finite Geometry: A Reply to Mark Pressman. Hume Studies 26 (1):183-185.score: 3.0
  35. Lorne Falkenstein (2004). Reid and Smith on Vision. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 2 (2):103-118.score: 3.0
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  36. Lorne Falkenstein (2004). Reading Hume on Human Understanding. Hume Studies 30 (1):183-187.score: 3.0
  37. Albert N. Katz & Lorne Giacommelli (1982). The Subjective Nature of Creativity Judgments. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 20 (1):17-20.score: 3.0
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  38. Lorne Falkenstein (2002). Hume and Reid on the Perception of Hardness. Hume Studies 28 (1):27-48.score: 3.0
    This paper considers an objection to the Humean view that perception involves introspective acquaintance with representative images. The objection, originally raised by Thomas Reid and recently endorsed by Nicholas Wolterstorff, states that no representative image can be hard, and concludes that acquaintance with such images cannot therefore account for our perception of hardness. I argue in response that a case has not been made for denying that representative images can be hard. Hardness, as understood by Hume and Reid, is the (...)
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  39. Lorne Campbell (1977). The Authorship of the Recueil D'Arras. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 40:301-313.score: 3.0
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  40. Lorne Falkenstein (1995). Hume and Reid on the Simplicity of the Soul. Hume Studies 21 (1):25-45.score: 3.0
    Reid is well known for rejecting the "philosophy of ideas"--a theory of mental representation that he claimed to find in its most vitriolic form in Hume. But there was another component of Hume's philosophy that exerted an equally powerful influence on Reid: Hume's attack on the notion of spiritual substance in _Treatise 1.4.5. I summarize this neglected aspect of Hume's philosophy and argue that much of Reid's epistemology can be explained as an attempt to buttress dualism against the effects of (...)
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  41. Lorne Falkenstein (1993). The Natural and the Normative. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (2):476-480.score: 3.0
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  42. Lorne Falkenstein (1991). Book Review:Particles and Ideas: Bishop Berkeley's Corpuscularian Philosophy Gabriel Moked. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 58 (1):133-.score: 3.0
  43. Lorne Falkenstein (2000). Hume's Finite Geometry. Hume Studies 26 (1):183-185.score: 3.0
  44. Lorne Falkenstein (2003). Hume's Reason. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (1):233-236.score: 3.0
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  45. Lorne Falkenstein (1990). Was Kant a Nativist? Journal of the History of Ideas 51 (4):573-597.score: 3.0
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  46. Lorne N. Switzer & Hui Lin (2009). Corporate Governance, Compliance and Valuation Effects of Sarbanes-Oxley on US and Foreign Firms. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 4 (4):400-426.score: 3.0
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  47. Lorne Falkenstein (2001). Debate: Langton on Things in Themselves: Critique of Kantian Humility. Kantian Review 5 (1):49-64.score: 3.0
    Rae Langton's main purpose in Kantian Humility is to uncover the reasons that led Kant to claim that we can have no knowledge of things in themselves. As part of this effort, she articulates and attempts to defend a novel and intriguing position on what things in themselves are for Kant, and what it means for him to deny knowledge of them. Though the presentation of these views is lucid and informed by selective citation from a range of Kant's works, (...)
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  48. Lorne Falkenstein & David Welton (2001). Humean Contiguity. History of Philosophy Quarterly 18 (3):279 - 296.score: 3.0
  49. Lorne Falkenstein (2004). Reading Hume on Human Understanding: Essays on the First Enquiry (Review). Hume Studies 30 (1):183-187.score: 3.0
  50. Lorne Falkenstein (1999). Space and the Self in Hume's Treatise. [REVIEW] Hume Studies 25 (1/2):241-249.score: 3.0
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