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Lorraine Code [66]Lorraine B. Code [3]
  1. Lorraine B. Code (forthcoming). Responsibility and the Epistemic Community: Woman's Place. Social Research.
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  2. Lorraine Code (2014). Virtue, Reason and Wisdom. In Stan van Hooft & Nafsika Athanassoulis (eds.), The Handbook of Virtue Ethics. Acumen Publishing Ltd..
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  3. Lorraine Code (2013). Culpable Ignorance? Hypatia 29 (2).
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  4. Lorraine Code (2011). An Ecology of Epistemic Authority. Episteme 8 (1):24-37.
    I offer an examination of trust relations in scientific inquiry as they seem to contrast with a lack of trust in an example of knowledge imposed from above by an unaccountable institutional power structure. On this basis I argue for a re-reading of John Hardwig's account of the place of trust in knowledge, and suggest that it translates less well than social epistemologists and others have assumed into a model for democratic epistemic practice.
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  5. Lorraine Code (2011). A New Epistemology of Rape? Philosophical Papers 38 (3):327-345.
    In this essay I take issue with entrenched conceptions of individual autonomy for how they block understandings of the implications of rape in patriarchal cultures both 'at home' and in situations of armed conflict. I focus on human vulnerability as it manifests in sedimented assumptions about violence against women as endemic to male-female relations, thwarting possibilities of knowing the specific harms particular acts of rape enact well enough to render intelligible their far-reaching social-political-moral implications. Taking my point of departure from (...)
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  6. Lorraine Code (2011). Self, Subjectivity, and the Instituted Social Imaginary. In Shaun Gallagher (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Self. Oup Oxford.
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  7. Lorraine Code (2010). Testimony, Advocacy, Ignorance: Thinking Ecologically About Social Knowledge. In Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Social Epistemology. Oup Oxford.
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  8. Lorraine Code (2008). Advocacy, Negotiation, and the Politics of Unknowing. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (S1):32-51.
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  9. Lorraine Code (2008). Review of Miranda Fricker, Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (3).
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  10. Lorraine Code (2008). Thinking About. Hypatia 23 (1).
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  11. Lorraine Code (2008). Thinking About "Ecological Thinking". Hypatia 23 (1):187 - 203.
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  12. Lorraine Code, Struan Jacobs, Deepanwita Dasgupta, Charles R. Twardy & Rafaela Hillerbrand (2008). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):97 – 114.
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  13. Lorraine Code (2007). Feminist Epistemologies and Women's Lives. In Linda Alcoff & Eva Feder Kittay (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
     
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  14. Lorraine Code (2006). Ecological Thinking: The Politics of Epistemic Location. OUP USA.
    How could ecological thinking animate an epistemology capable of addressing feminist, multicultural, and other post-colonial concerns? Starting from an epistemological approach implicit in Rachel Carson's scientific practice, Lorraine Code elaborates the creative, restructuring resources of ecology for a theory of knowledge. She critiques the instrumental rationality, abstract individualism, and exploitation of people and places that western epistemologies of mastery have legitimated, to propose a politics of epistemic location, sensitive to the interplay of particularity and diversity, and focused on responsible epistemic (...)
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  15. Lorraine Code (2006). Review: Kory Spencer Sorrell. Representative Practices: Peirce, Pragmatism, and Feminist Epistemology. Fordham University Press, 2004. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (1):154-158.
  16. Lorraine Code (2006). Representative Practices: Peirce, Pragmatism, and Feminist Epistemology (Review). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (1):154-158.
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  17. Lorraine Code (2006). Skepticism and the Lure of Ambiguity. Hypatia 21 (3):222-228.
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  18. Lorraine Code (2005). Ecological Naturalism: Epistemic Responsibility and the Politics of Knowledge. Dialogue and Universalism 15 (5-6):87-102.
    The thesis of this paper is, first, that ecological thinking—which takes its point of departure from specifically located, multifaceted analyses of knowledge production and circulation in diverse demographic and geographic locations—can generate more responsible knowings than the reductivism of the positivist post-Enlightenment legacy allows; and second, that ecological thinking can spark a revolution comparable to Kant’s Copernican revolution, which recentered western thought by moving “man” to the center of the philosophical-conceptual universe. Kantian philosophy was parochial in the conception of “man” (...)
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  19. Lorraine Code (2005). Here and There: Reading Christopher Preston's Grounding Knowledge. Ethics, Place and Environment 8 (3):349 – 360.
    (2005). Here and There: Reading Christopher Preston's Grounding Knowledge . Ethics, Place & Environment: Vol. 8, Place-based and Environmental Education, pp. 349-360. doi: 10.1080/13668790500348364.
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  20. Lorraine Code (2005). Women Philosophers: Genre and the Boundaries of Philosophy (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (2):215-216.
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  21. Lorraine Code (2004). The Power Of Ignorance. Philosophical Papers 33 (3):291-308.
    Abstract Taking my point of entry from George Eliot's reference to ?the power of Ignorance?, I analyse some manifestations of that power as she portrays it in the life of a young woman of affluence, in her novel Daniel Deronda. Comparing and contrasting this kind of ignorance with James Mill's avowed ignorance of local tradition and custom in his History of British India, I consider how ignorance can foster immoral beliefs which, in turn, contribute to social-political arrangements of dominance and (...)
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  22. Lorraine Code (ed.) (2003). Feminist Interpretations of Hans-Georg Gadamer. Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Fifteen essays examine the work of German philosopher Hans Georg Gadamer to provide feminist interpretations of his views on science, language, history, ...
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  23. Lorraine Code (2003). Introduction: Why Feminists Do Not Read Gadamer. In , Feminist Interpretations of Hans-Georg Gadamer. Pennsylvania State University Press. 1--36.
     
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  24. Lorraine Code (2002). Narratives of Responsibility and Agency: Reading Margaret Walker's. Hypatia 17 (1).
    : Naturalized moral epistemology eschews practices of assuming to know a priori the nature of situations and experiences that require moral deliberation. Thus it promises to close a gap between formal ethical theories and circumstances where people need guidelines for action. Yet according experience so central a place in inquiry risks "naturalizing" it, treating it as incontestable, separating its moral and political dimensions. This essay discusses these issues with reference to Margaret Walker's Moral understandings.
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  25. Lorraine Code (2002). Narratives of Responsibility and Agency: Reading Margaret Walker's Moral Understandings. Hypatia 17 (1):156 - 173.
    Naturalized moral epistemology eschews practices of assuming to know a priori the nature of situations and experiences that require moral deliberation. Thus it promises to close a gap between formal ethical theories and circumstances where people need guidelines for action. Yet according experience so central a place in inquiry risks "naturalizing" it, treating it as incontestable, separating its moral and political dimensions. This essay discusses these issues with reference to Margaret Walker's Moral understandings.
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  26. Nicholas Rescher, Richard Shusterman, Linda Martín Alcoff, Lorraine Code, Sandra Harding, Bat-Ami Bar On, John Lachs, John J. Stuhr, Douglas Kellner, Thomas E. Wartenberg, Paul C. Taylor, Nancey Murphy, Charles W. Mills, Nancy Tuana & Joseph Margolis (2002). The Philosophical I: Personal Reflections on Life in Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  27. Patrick Baert, Brian Baigrie, Stanley Barrett, Pascal Boyer, Michael Chiarello, R. H. Coase, Lorraine Code, Wes Cooper, Timothy M. Costelloe & Robert D’Amico (2000). Refereeing in 1997. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 30 (3):480.
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  28. Lorraine Code (ed.) (2000). Encyclopedia of Feminist Theories. Routledge.
    The path-breaking Encyclopedia of Feminist Theories is an accessible, multidisciplinary insight into the complex field of feminist thought. The Encyclopedia contains over 500 authoritative entries commissioned from an international team of contributors and includes clear, concise and provocative explanations of key themes and ideas. Each entry contains cross references and a bibliographic guide to further reading; over 50 biographical entries provide readers with a sense of how the theories they encounter have developed out of the lives and situations of their (...)
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  29. Lorraine Code (2000). Patriarchy. In , Encyclopedia of Feminist Theories. Routledge. 378--379.
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  30. Lorraine Code (2000). Statements of Fact. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (Supplement):175-208.
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  31. Lorraine Code (2000). Statements of Fact: Whose? Where? When? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (sup1):175-208.
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  32. Lorraine Code (2000). The Perversion of Autonomy and the Subjection of Women: Discourses of Social Advocacy at Century's End. In Catriona Mackenzie & Natalie Stoljar (eds.), Relational Autonomy: Feminist Perspectives on Autonomy, Agency, and the Social Self. Oup Usa.
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  33. Lorraine Code (1999). Hypatia's Daughters. Dialogue 38 (1):202-205.
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  34. Lorraine Code (1999). Hypatia's Daughters: Fifteen Hundred Years of Women Philosophers Linda Lopez McAlister, Editor Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1996, Xiv + 345pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (01):202-.
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  35. Lorraine Code (1998). Lorraine Code. In Alcoff Linda (ed.), Epistemology: The Big Questions. Blackwell. 124.
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  36. Lorraine Code (1998). How to Think Globally: Stretching the Limits of Imagination. Hypatia 13 (2):73 - 85.
    Here I discuss some epistemological questions posed by projects of attempting to think globally, in light of the impossibility of affirming universal sameness. I illustrate one strategy for embarking on such a project, ecologically, in a reading of an essay by Chandra Talpade Mohanty. And I conclude by suggesting that the North/South border between Canada and the U.S.A. generates underacknowledged issues of cultural alterity.
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  37. Lorraine Code (1996). What Is Natural About Epistemology Naturalized? American Philosophical Quarterly 33 (1):1 - 22.
    I evaluate post-Quinean naturalized epistemology as a resource for postcolonial and feminist epistemology. I argue that naturalistic inquiry into material conditions and institutions of knowledge production has most to offer epistemologists committed to maintaining continuity with the knowledge production of specifically located knowers. Yet naturalistic denigrations of folk epistemic practices and stereotyped, hence often oppressive, readings of human nature challenge the naturalness of the nature they claim to study. I outline an ecologically modelled epistemology that focuses on questions of epistemic (...)
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  38. Lorraine Code (1996). Commentary on "Loopholes, Gaps, and What is Held Fast&Quot. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (4):255-260.
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  39. Lorraine Code (1995). Incredulity, Experientialism and the Politics of Knowledge. In Incredulity, Experientialism and the Politics of Knowing. Routledge. 58-82.
  40. Lorraine Code (1995). Rhetorical Spaces: Essays on Gendered Locations. Routledge.
    The essays in Rhetorical Spaces grow out of Lorraine Code's ongoing commitment to engaging philosophical issues as they figure in people's everyday lives. The arguements in this book are informed at once by the moral-political implications of how knowledge is produced and circulated and by issues of gendered subjectivity. In their critical dimension, these lucid essays engage with the incapacity of the philosophical mainstream's dominant epistemologies to offer regulative principles that guide people in the epistemic projects that figure centrally in (...)
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  41. Lorraine Code (1994). Responsibility and Rhetoric. Hypatia 9 (1):1 - 20.
    In this paper I offer a retrospective rereading of my work on epistemic responsibility in order to see why this inquiry has found only an uneasy location within the discourse of Anglo-American epistemology. I trace the history of the work's production, circulation and reception, and examine the feminist implications of the discussions it has occasioned.
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  42. Lorraine Code (1994). Who Cares? The Poverty of Objectivism for a Moral Epistemology. In Allan Megill (ed.), Rethinking Objectivity. Duke University Press. 179--195.
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  43. Lorraine Code (1994). Whose Science? Whose Knowledge? International Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):115-116.
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  44. Derek Allen, Maryann Ayim, Sharon Bailin, Mark Battersby, Jerome Bickenbach, Robert Binkley, Alan Brinton, Richard N. Bronaugh, Michael Burke & Lorraine Code (1991). And Typically Write Extensive Comments. In Many Cases They Also Review Revised Ver-Sions of Papers. The Authors, This Journal, and the Aca-Demic Community in General All Benefit. Informal Logic 13:3.
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  45. Lorraine Code (1991). The Social and Political Thought of R. G. Collingwood. Teaching Philosophy 14 (3):348-352.
  46. Lorraine Code (1991). What Can She Know?: Feminist Theory and the Construction of Knowledge. Cornell University Press.
    CHAPTER ONE Is the Sex of the Knower Epistemologically Significant? The Question A question that focuses on the knower, as the title of this chapter does, ...
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  47. Lorraine Code (1991). Will the “Good Enough” Feminists Please Stand Up? Social Theory and Practice 17 (1):85-104.
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  48. Lorraine Code (1990). Mary McCanney Gergen, Ed., Feminist Thought and the Structure of Knowledge Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 10 (2):60-63.
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  49. Lorraine Code (1989). The Theory of Epistemic Rationality. Review of Metaphysics 42 (4):829-831.
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  50. Lorraine Code (1988). Alvin I. Goldman, Epistemology and Cognition Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 8 (10):398-401.
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