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  1. Sheldon T. Berkowitz, Louis E. Newman & Deborah R. Mathieu (forthcoming). Case Studies: C-Section for Organ Donation. Hastings Center Report.
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  2. Louis E. Newman (2013). Balancing Justice and Mercy. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (3):435-456.
    The concept of forgiveness is analyzed as a moral gesture toward the offender designed to help restore that individual's moral standing. Jewish sources on the conditions under which forgiveness is obligatory are explored and two contrasting positions are presented: one in which the obligation to forgive is conditional on the repentance of the offender and another in which people are required to forgive unconditionally. These two positions are shown to represent different ways of framing the offending behavior that rest, in (...)
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  3. Louis E. Newman (2012). Love Thy Neighbor as Thyself_, And: _Maimonides and His Heritage (Review). Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 32 (1):196-199.
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  4. Louis E. Newman (1997). Review: Covenantal Responsibility in a Modern Context: Recent Work in Jewish Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 25 (1):183 - 210.
    This essay presents and analyzes the recent work of four prominent contemporary Jewish ethicists: Eugene Borowitz, David Novak, Byron Sherwin, and Walter Wurzburger. These authors are united in their affirmation of covenant as the central category of Jewish moral obligation and their concern to construct a Jewish ethic out of the classical sources of Judaism. Yet, as an individual analysis of their books will show, they adopt markedly different views of the authority of traditional Jewish law (halakha), the respective roles (...)
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  5. Elliot N. Dorff & Louis E. Newman (eds.) (1995). Contemporary Jewish Ethics and Morality: A Reader. Oxford University Press.
    Over the past decade much significant new work has appeared in the field of Jewish ethics. While much of this work has been devoted to issues in applied ethics, a number of important essays have explored central themes within the tradition and clarified the theoretical foundations of Jewish ethics. This important text grew out of the need for a single work which accurately and conveniently reflects these developments within the field. The first text of its kind in almost two decades, (...)
     
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  6. Louis E. Newman (1993). Talking Ethics with Strangers: A View From Jewish Tradition. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (6):549-567.
    Tristram Engelhardt provides an important set of reflections for bioethics in a secular context. Taking Engelhardt's work as its point of departure this article explores the challenges that Jewish ethicists face in contributing to bioethics in a secular context. The article explores how the Jewish tradition can address issues in bioethics in ways that are true to its tradition and at the same time accessible and relevant to "moral strangers" in a secular society. Keywords: bioethics, Engelhardt, Jewish tradition, moral strangers, (...)
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  7. Louis E. Newman, Bonnie B. O'Connor, Jean-Pierre Poullier, Mark Risjord, Wendell Stephenson & Mark D. Sullivan (1993). A Qualified Bioethic: Particularity in James Gustafson and Stanley Hauer-Was, by Gerald P. McKenny 511 Advance Directives for Voluntary Euthanasia: A Volatile Combination? By Leslie Pickering Francis 297 After the Fall: Particularism in Bioethics, by Kevin Wm. Wildes, 5.7. 505. [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18:599-602.
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  8. Louis E. Newman (1992). Jewish Theology and Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (3):309-327.
    This article explores the theological foundations of both classical and contemporary Jewish ethics, with special reference to biomedical issues. Traditional views concerning God's revelation to Israel are shown to underlie the methodological orientation of classical Jewish ethics, which is both legalistic and particularistic. Contemporary Jewish ethicists, by contrast, have tended to embrace more liberal views of revelation which have mitigated both the legalism and the particularism of their approach. Apart from methodological considerations, much of the content of Jewish medical ethics (...)
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