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Louis W. Hodges [8]Louis Hodges [6]
  1. Chad Painter & Louis Hodges (2011). Mocking the News: How The Daily Show with Jon Stewart Holds Traditional Broadcast News Accountable. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 25 (4):257-274.
    The purpose of this study is to see how Jon Stewart and his Daily Show colleagues hold traditional broadcast media accountable. This paper suggests Stewart is holding those who claim they are practicing journalism accountable to the public they claim to serve and outlines the normative implications of that accountability. There is a journalistic norm that media practitioners, and the media as a whole, should be accountable to the public. Here, accountability ?refers to the process by which media are called (...)
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  2. Louis W. Hodges, Mark Douglas, Rick Kenney, Christine Dellert & Arthur L. Caplan (2006). Cases and Commentaries. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 21 (2 & 3):215 – 228.
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  3. Louis W. Hodges, Tom Bivins, Deni Elliott, Christopher Hanson & Edward Wasserman (2005). Cases and Commentaries. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 20 (2 & 3):209 – 221.
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  4. Louis Hodges (2004). Accountability in Journalism. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3-4):173-180.
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  5. Louis W. Hodges, Lisa H. Newton, Jerry Dunklee, Eugene L. Roberts, Andrew Sikula & Chris Roberts (2004). Cases and Commentaries. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3 & 4):293 – 306.
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  6. Lisa H. Newton, Louis Hodges & Susan Keith (2004). Accountability in the Professions: Accountability in Journalism. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 19 (3 & 4):166 – 190.
    Accountability is viewed as a civilizing element in society, with professional accountability formalized in most cases as duties dating to the Greeks and Socrates; journalists must find their own way, without formal professional or government regulation or licensing. Three scholars look at the process in a line from the formal professional discipline to suggesting problems the journalism fraternity faces without regulation to suggesting serious internal ethics conferences as 1 solution to the problem.
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  7. Louis W. Hodges (1998). Journalistic Accountability and the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. Professional Ethics 6 (3/4):199-216.
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  8. Louis W. Hodges (1996). Ruminations About the Communitarian Debate. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 11 (3):133 – 139.
    The current revival of communitarian thinking, alongside public journalism as its journalistic counterpart, is one response to thefractures that characterize modern society. I identifyfive symptoms/causes ofthefractured world. I then show, briefly, some contrasts between the communitarian ideal and that of liberal democracy. The conclusion calls for journalists to undertake the task of reworking our basic conceptual framework in ways that avoid the twin extreme, and naive anthropologies of individualism and collectivism in favor o f a communitarian view based upon acknowledgment (...)
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  9. Louis Hodges (1995). A Primer of Issues in Ethics: A Book Review by Louis Hodges. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (3):184.
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  10. Louis Hodges (1994). The Journalist and Privacy. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 9 (4):197 – 212.
    The moral right to privacy consists of the power to determine who may gain access to information about oneself. Individual human beings need some measure of privacy in order to develop a sense of self and to avoid manipulation by the state. Journalists who respect the privacy rights of those on whom they report should especially be careful not to intrude unduly when gathering information, in publishing they should be able to demonstrate a public need to know private information. Individual (...)
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  11. Louis W. Hodges (1988). Undercover, Masquerading, Surreptitious Taping. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 3 (2):26 – 36.
    The moral dimensions of undercover investigations by reporters are explored for their deception characteristics, using disclosures about a clinic in which doctors told women they were pregnant when they were not as an example. Three test questions are posed for the justifying of deceptive tactics in gathering information. In addition to undercover investigations, the morality of surreptitious taping is also discussed.
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  12. Louis W. Hodges (1986). The Journalist and Professionalism. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 1 (2):32 – 36.
    This essay by the director of Washington & Lee University's applied ethics program for Society and the Professions argues that journalists must begin taking themselves seriously as members of a profession if journalism is to gain the respect it needs to function effectively in society. Journalism, argues the author, may not possess all the classical attributes of professionalism, but it does possess the most important ones. The essay maintains that professionalism in journalism is important for the welfare of both the (...)
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