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    Louis S. Berger (1996). Toward a Non-Cartesian Psychotherapeutic Framework: Radical Pragmatism as an Alternative. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (3):169-184.
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  2. Louis S. Berger (2011). Language and the Ineffable: A Developmental Perspective and its Applications. Lexington Books.
    The prevailing conception of language is often called "the received view." Though ubiquitous, Louis S. Berger demonstrates its flaws and the difficulties it raises for other disciplines, such as philosophy and physics. In Language and the Ineffable, Berger develops an unconventional model of human development: ontogenesis. A radical and generative feature of the model is the premise that the neonate's world is holistic, boundary-less, unimaginable, and impossible to describe; in other words, ineffable. This study unsettles the foundations of sacrosanct beliefs (...)
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  3. Louis S. Berger (2016). Psychoanalytic Theory and Clinical Relevance: What Makes a Theory Consequential for Practice? Routledge.
    In this provocative contribution to both psychoanalytic theory and the philosophy of science, Louis Berger grapples with the nature of "consequential" theorizing, i.e., theorizing that is relevant to what transpires in clinical practice. By examining analysis as a genre of "state process formalism" - the standard format of scientific theories - Berger demonstrates why contemporary theorizing inevitably fails to explain crucial aspects of practice. His critique, in this respect, pertains both to the formal structure of psychoanalytic explanation and the technical (...)
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