Search results for 'Louise Hull' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Louise Hull (2004). Time and Memory. Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (2):363 – 364.score: 240.0
    Book Information Time and Memory: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Time and Memory: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology Christoph Hoerl and McCormack Teresa , eds., Oxford: Clarendon Press , 2001 , xiii + 419 , £45 ( cloth ), £17.99 ( paper ) Edited by Christoph Hoerl; and McCormack Teresa . Oxford: Clarendon Press. Pp. xiii + 419. £45 (cloth:), £17.99 (paper:).
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  2. Dennis Bates, Gloria Durka, Friedrich Schweitzer & John M. Hull (eds.) (2006). Education, Religion and Society: Essays in Honour of John M. Hull. Routledge.score: 210.0
    Education, Religion and Society celebrates the career of Professor John Hull of the University of Birmingham, UK, the internationally renowned religious educationist who has also achieved worldwide fame for his brilliant writings on his experience, mid-career, of total blindness. In his outstanding career he has been a leading figure in the transformation of religious education in English and Welsh state schools from Christian instruction to multi-faith religious education and was the co-founder of the International Seminar on Religious Education and (...)
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  3. C. Sampford, J. Louise, S. Blencowe & T. Round, Retrospectivity and the Rule of Law / C. Sampford ; with the Assistance of J. Louise, S. Blencowe, and T. Round.score: 180.0
    Retrospective rule-making has few supporters and many opponents. Defenders of retrospective laws generally do so on the basis that they are a necessary evil in specific or limited circumstances, for example to close tax loopholes, to deal with terrorists or to prosecute fallen tyrants. Yet the reality of retrospective rule making is far more widespread than this, and ranges from ’corrective’ legislation to ’interpretive regulations’ to judicial decision making. The search for a rational justification for retrospective rule-making necessitates a reconsideration (...)
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  4. David L. Hull (2001). Science and Selection: Essays on Biological Evolution and the Philosophy of Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    One way to understand science is as a selection process. David Hull, one of the dominant figures in contemporary philosophy of science, sets out in this volume a general analysis of this selection process that applies equally to biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to antigens, operant learning, and social and conceptual change in science. Hull aims to distinguish between those characteristics that are contingent features of selection and those that are essential. Science and Selection brings (...)
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  5. R. Bruce Hull (2006). Infinite Nature. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    You would be hard-pressed to find someone who categorically opposes protecting the environment, yet most people would agree that the environmentalist movement has been ineffectual and even misguided. Some argue that its agenda is misplaced, oppressive, and misanthropic—a precursor to intrusive government, regulatory bungles, and economic stagnation. Others point out that its alarmist rhetoric and preservationist solutions are outdated and insufficient to the task of galvanizing support for true reform. In this impassioned and judicious work, R. Bruce Hull argues (...)
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  6. J. Louise, Brute Rationality.score: 60.0
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  7. Richard Hull, The Alchemy of Informed Consent Revisited.score: 60.0
    Second, let me offer an apology for not having a handout for this talk. I do have a website that contains most of my talks and published papers, as well as various other ravings collected over thirty-plus years of ruminating, and you are each welcome to visit it and acquire for your own reading pleasure or other legitimate purposes (such as composing refutations of my foolish views) such copies as you may require. Just don’t steal my ideas and misrepresent them (...)
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  8. Richard Thompson Hull (2005). Autobiography. In Elizabeth D. Boepple (ed.), Sui Generis: Essays Presented to Richard Thompson Hull on the Occasion of His Sixty-Fifth Birthday. Authorhouse.score: 60.0
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  9. Richard Hull (2013). Deprivation and Freedom: A Philosophical Enquiry. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Deprivation and Freedom investigates the key issue of social deprivation. It looks at how serious that issue is, what we should do about it and how we might motivate people to respond to it. It covers core areas in moral and political philosophy in new and interesting ways, presents the topical example of disability as a form of social deprivation, shows that we are not doing nearly enough for certain sections of our communities and encourages that we think differently about (...)
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  10. Wlaine Mangelsdorf Hull (2005). Foreword: Never Say No to Adventure! In Elizabeth D. Boepple (ed.), Sui Generis: Essays Presented to Richard Thompson Hull on the Occasion of His Sixty-Fifth Birthday. Authorhouse.score: 60.0
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  11. Joshua May, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Jay G. Hull & Aaron Zimmerman (2010). Practical Interests, Relevant Alternatives, and Knowledge Attributions: An Empirical Study. [REVIEW] Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (2):265–273.score: 30.0
    In defending his interest-relative account of knowledge in Knowledge and Practical Interests (2005), Jason Stanley relies heavily on intuitions about several bank cases. We experimentally test the empirical claims that Stanley seems to make concerning our common-sense intuitions about these bank cases. Additionally, we test the empirical claims that Jonathan Schaffer seems to make in his critique of Stanley. We argue that our data impugn what both Stanley and Schaffer claim our intuitions about such cases are. To account for these (...)
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  12. Richard Hull (2000). Deconstructing the Doctrine of Double Effect. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (2):195-207.score: 30.0
    This paper examines the doctrine of double effect as it is typically applied. The difficulty of distinguishing between what we intend and what we foresee is highlighted. In particular, Warren Quinn's articulation of that distinction is examined and criticised. It is then proposed that the only credible way that we can be said to foresee that a harm will result and mean something other than that we intend it to result, is if we are not certain that that harm will (...)
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  13. David L. Hull (1997). What's Wrong with Invisible-Hand Explanations? Philosophy of Science 64 (4):126.score: 30.0
    An invisible hand seems to play an important role in science. In this paper I set out the general structure of invisible-hand explanations, counter some objections that have been raised to them, and detail the role that they play in science. The most important issue is the character of the mechanisms that are supposed to bring about invisible-hand effects.
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  14. David L. Hull (1999). The Use and Abuse of Sir Karl Popper. Biology and Philosophy 14 (4):481-504.score: 30.0
    Karl Popper has been one of the few philosophers of sciences who has influenced scientists. I evaluate Popper's influence on our understanding of evolutionary theory from his earliest publications to the present. Popper concluded that three sorts of statements in evolutionary biology are not genuine laws of nature. I take him to be right on this score. Popper's later distinction between evolutionary theory as a metaphysical research program and as a scientific theory led more than one scientist to misunderstand his (...)
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  15. Jennie Louise (2004). Relativity of Value and the Consequentialist Umbrella. Philosophical Quarterly 54 (217):518–536.score: 30.0
    Does the real difference between non-consequentialist and consequentialist theories lie in their approach to value? Non-consequentialist theories are thought either to allow a different kind of value (namely, agent-relative value) or to advocate a different response to value ('honouring' rather than 'promoting'). One objection to this idea implies that all normative theories are describable as consequentialist. But then the distinction between honouring and promoting collapses into the distinction between relative and neutral value. A proper description of non-consequentialist theories can only (...)
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  16. Jennie Louise (2009). I Won't Do It! Self-Prediction, Moral Obligation and Moral Deliberation. Philosophical Studies 146 (3):327 - 348.score: 30.0
    This paper considers the question of whether predictions of wrongdoing are relevant to our moral obligations. After giving an analysis of ‘won’t’ claims (i.e., claims that an agent won’t Φ), the question is separated into two different issues: firstly, whether predictions of wrongdoing affect our objective moral obligations, and secondly, whether self-prediction of wrongdoing can be legitimately used in moral deliberation. I argue for an affirmative answer to both questions, although there are conditions that must be met for self-prediction to (...)
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  17. Robert Hull (2005). All About EVE: A Report on Environmental Virtue Ethics Today. Ethics and the Environment 10 (1):89-110.score: 30.0
    : In this paper I examine and assess an important developing trend in environmental ethics, environmental virtue ethics. I begin by providing a thorough survey of influential and representative contributions to environmental virtue ethics. Along with explaining these contributions to environmental virtue ethics I discuss their various strengths and weaknesses. In the second section I explain what I believe an environmental virtue ethic needs to do to complement other perspectives in environmental ethics. Then, using the best aspects of previously published (...)
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  18. Gordon Hull (2009). Clearing the Rubbish: Locke, the Waste Proviso, and the Moral Justification of Intellectual Property. Public Affairs Quarterly 23 (1):67-93.score: 30.0
  19. Gerald Hull, How Can Morality Be in My Interest.score: 30.0
    It is natural to oppose morality and self-interest; it is customary also to oppose morality to interests as such, an inclination encouraged by Kantian tradition. However, if “interest” is understood simply as what moves a person to do this rather than that, then – if persons ever actually are good and do what is right – there must be moral interests. Bradley, in posing the “Why should I be moral?” question, raises Kant-inspired objections to the possibility of moral interests qua (...)
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  20. David L. Hull (2001). The Success of Science and Social Norms. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (3/4):341 - 360.score: 30.0
    In this paper I characterize science in terms of both invisible hand social organization and selection. These two processes are responsible for different features of science. Individuals working in isolation cannot produce much in the way of the warranted knowledge. Individual biases severely limit how much secure knowledge an individual can generate on his or her own. Individuals working in consort are required, but social groups can be organized in many different ways. The key feature of the social organization in (...)
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  21. Gordon Hull, Heather Richter Lipford & Celine Latulipe (2011). Contextual Gaps: Privacy Issues on Facebook. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 13 (4):289-302.score: 30.0
    Social networking sites like Facebook are rapidly gaining in popularity. At the same time, they seem to present significant privacy issues for their users. We analyze two of Facebooks’s more recent features, Applications and News Feed, from the perspective enabled by Helen Nissenbaum’s treatment of privacy as “contextual integrity.” Offline, privacy is mediated by highly granular social contexts. Online contexts, including social networking sites, lack much of this granularity. These contextual gaps are at the root of many of the sites’ (...)
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  22. David L. Hull (1965). The Effect of Essentialism on Taxonomy--Two Thousand Years of Stasis (I). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 15 (60):314-326.score: 30.0
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  23. David L. Hull (1978). A Matter of Individuality. Philosophy of Science 45 (3):335-360.score: 30.0
    Biological species have been treated traditionally as spatiotemporally unrestricted classes. If they are to perform the function which they do in the evolutionary process, they must be spatiotemporally localized individuals, historical entities. Reinterpreting biological species as historical entities solves several important anomalies in biology, in philosophy of biology, and within philosophy itself. It also has important implications for any attempt to present an "evolutionary" analysis of science and for sciences such as anthropology which are devoted to the study of single (...)
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  24. David L. Hull (1980). On Human Nature. Environmental Ethics 2 (1):81-88.score: 30.0
    If species are the things that evolve at least in large part through the action of natural selection, then both genetic and phenotypic variability are essential to biological species. If all species are variable, then Homo sapiens must be variable. Hence, it is very unlikely that the human species as a biological species can be characterized by a set of invariable traits. It might be the case that at this moment in evolutionary history, all human beings happen to possess a (...)
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  25. Carrie L. Hull (2003). Poststructuralism, Behaviorism and the Problem of Hate Speech. Philosophy and Social Criticism 29 (5):517-535.score: 30.0
  26. David L. Hull, Andrew Lugg, Robert E. Butts & I. C. Jarvie (1979). Review Symposium : Laurens Laudan. Progress and its Problems: Toward a Theory of Scientific Growth. Berkeley and Los Angeles: The University of California Press, 1977. Pp. X + 257.Laudan's Progress and its Problems. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 9 (4):457-465.score: 30.0
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  27. Jennie Louise (2009). Correct Responses and the Priority of the Normative. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (4):345 - 364.score: 30.0
    The ‘Wrong Kind of Reason’ problem for buck-passing theories (theories which hold that the normative is explanatorily or conceptually prior to the evaluative) is to explain why the existence of pragmatic or strategic reasons for some response to an object does not suffice to ground evaluative claims about that object. The only workable reply seems to be to deny that there are reasons of the ‘wrong kind’ for responses, and to argue that these are really reasons for wanting, trying, or (...)
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  28. Gordon Hull, One View of the Dungeon: The Ticking Time Bomb Between Governmentality and Sovereignty.score: 30.0
    This paper analyzes "ticking time bomb" scenarios in the discursive legitimation of torture and other coercive interrogation techniques. Judith Butler proposes a Foucauldian framework to suggest that Adminstration policies can be read as the irruption of sovereignty within governmentality. Rereading Foucault, I suggest that the policies could equally be understood as an exercise of governmentality, i.e., the subordination of juridical law to economy. I then propose as a reconciliation of these readings that time bomb scenarios serve rhetorically to make the (...)
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  29. Gerald Hull, The Eliminability of Higher Order Vagueness.score: 30.0
    It is generally supposed that borderline cases account for the tolerance of vague terms, yet cannot themselves be sharply bounded, leading to infinite levels of higher order vagueness. This higher order vagueness subverts any formal effort to make language precise. However, it is possible to show that tolerance must diminish at higher orders. The attempt to derive it from indiscriminability founders on a simple empirical test, and we learn instead that there is no limit to how small higher order tolerance (...)
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  30. David L. Hull (1965). The Effect of Essentialism on Taxonomy--Two Thousand Years of Stasis (II). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 16 (61):1-18.score: 30.0
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  31. Jennie Louise (2006). Right Motive, Wrong Action: Direct Consequentialism and Evaluative Conflict. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (1):65 - 85.score: 30.0
    In this paper I look at attempts to develop forms of consequentialism which do not have a feature considered problematic in Direct Consequentialist theories (that is, those consequentialist theories that apply the criterion of rightness directly in the evaluation of any set of options). The problematic feature in question (which I refer to as ‘evaluative conflict’) is the possibility that, for example, a right motive might lead an agent to perform a wrong act. Theories aiming to avoid this phenomenon must (...)
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  32. Gerald Hull, Vagueness Without Indefiniteness.score: 30.0
    Contemporary discussions do not always clearly distinguish two different forms of vagueness. Sometimes focus is on the imprecision of predicates, and sometimes the indefiniteness of statements. The two are intimately related, of course. A predicate is imprecise if there are instances to which it neither definitely applies nor definitely does not apply, instances of which it is neither definitely true nor definitely false. However, indefinite statements will occur in everyday discourse only if speakers in fact apply imprecise predicates to such (...)
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  33. Margaret Betz Hull (2002). The Hidden Philosophy of Hannah Arendt. Routledgecurzon.score: 30.0
    Recognition of Hannah Arendt's contribution to the history of western philosophy is long overdue. Arendt was a 'political thinker', but this book highlights the importance of her ontological preoccupations for an understanding of her work.
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  34. Jennie Louise (forthcoming). Moral Demands and Not Doing the Best One Can. Ethics.score: 30.0
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  35. Walter Sinnott-armstrong, Ron Mallon, Tom Mccoy & Jay G. Hull (2008). Intention, Temporal Order, and Moral Judgments. Mind and Language 23 (1):90–106.score: 30.0
    The traditional philosophical doctrine of double effect claims that agents’ intentions affect whether acts are morally wrong. Our behavioral study reveals that agents’ intentions do affect whether acts are judged morally wrong, whereas the temporal order of good and bad effects affects whether acts are classified as killings. This finding suggests that the moral judgments are not based on the classifications. Our results also undermine recent claims that prior moral judgments determine whether agents are seen as causing effects intentionally rather (...)
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  36. Jennie Louise (2012). Collective Rationality: Equilibrium in Cooperative Games. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (1):205 - 205.score: 30.0
    Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Volume 90, Issue 1, Page 205, March 2012.
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  37. Richard Hull (1998). Defining Disability—a Philosophical Approach. Res Publica 4 (2):199-210.score: 30.0
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  38. David L. Hull, Rodney E. Langman & Sigrid S. Glenn (2001). A General Account of Selection: Biology, Immunology, and Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):511-528.score: 30.0
    Authors frequently refer to gene-based selection in biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to antigens, and operant learning as exemplifying selection processes in the same sense of this term. However, as obvious as this claim may seem on the surface, setting out an account of “selection” that is general enough to incorporate all three of these processes without becoming so general as to be vacuous is far from easy. In this target article, we set out such a general (...)
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  39. David L. Hull (1988). A Mechanism and its Metaphysics: An Evolutionary Account of the Social and Conceptual Development of Science. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 3 (2):123-155.score: 30.0
    The claim that conceptual systems change is a platitude. That our conceptual systems are theory-laden is no less platitudinous. Given evolutionary theory, biologists are led to divide up the living world into genes, organisms, species, etc. in a particular way. No theory-neutral individuation of individuals or partitioning of these individuals into natural kinds is possible. Parallel observations should hold for philosophical theories about scientific theories. In this paper I summarize a theory of scientific change which I set out in considerable (...)
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  40. Gordon Hull (1997). The Jewish Question Revisited: Marx, Derrida and Ethnic Nationalism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 23 (2):47-77.score: 30.0
    The question of nationalism as spoken about in contem porary circles is structurally the same as Marx's 'Jewish Question'. Through a reading of Marx's early writings, particularly the 'Jewish Question' essay, guided by Derrida's Specters of Marx and Benedict Anderson's Imagined Communities, it is possible to begin to rethink the nationalist question. In this light, nationalism emerges as the byproduct of the reduction of heterogeneous 'people' into a homo geneous 'state'; such 'excessive' voices occupy an ontological space outside of the (...)
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  41. Jay G. Hull, Laurie B. Slone, Karen B. Meteyer & Amanda R. Matthews (2002). The Nonconsciousness of Self-Consciousness. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 83 (2):406-424.score: 30.0
  42. David L. Hull (2004). Niche Construction: The Neglected Process in Evolution (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (2):314-316.score: 30.0
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  43. Gerald Hull, Vagueness, Truth and Varzi.score: 30.0
    Is 'vague' vague? Is the meaning of 'true' vague? Is higher-order vagueness unavoidable? Is it possible to say precisely what it is to say something precisely? These questions, deeply interrelated and of fundamental importance to logic and semantics, have been addressed recently by Achille Varzi in articles focused on an ingenius attempt by Roy Sorensen ("An Argument for the Vagueness of 'Vague'") to demonstrate that 'vague' is vague.
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  44. David L. Hull (2005). Deconstructing Darwin: Evolutionary Theory in Context. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (1):137 - 152.score: 30.0
    The topic of this paper is external versus internal explanations, first, of the genesis of evolutionary theory and, second, its reception. Victorian England was highly competitive and individualistic. So was the view of society promulgated by Malthus and the theory of evolution set out by Charles Darwin and A.R. Wallace. The fact that Darwin and Wallace independently produced a theory of evolution that was just as competitive and individualistic as the society in which they lived is taken as evidence for (...)
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  45. Gordon Hull, Normative Aspects of a 'Substantive' Precautionary Principle.score: 30.0
    This paper discusses some of the current literature around the precautionary principle in environmental philosophy and law with reference to the possibility of transgenic food in Uganda (GMO bananas specifically). My suggestion is that the distinction between formal and substantive versions of a principle, familiar from legal theory, can be useful in imposing some conceptual clarity on aspects of debates concerning the precautionary principle. In particular, most of the negative critical response to the principle has been to formal versions of (...)
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  46. Gordon Hull, Fantasies of Death and Demons: Hobbes Against the Ontological Illusion.score: 30.0
    Hobbes is commonly taken as arguing that individuals are primarily motivated by a fear of violent death. In this paper, I argue that, for Hobbes, people come with a wide range of fears and desires; analyzing how to redirect these into the politically stabilizing fear of death is a central preoccupation of Leviathan. One of the main problems is managing what I call the “ontological illusion,” the constitutive human tendency to take presentations of the imagination as entities in the world. (...)
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  47. David L. Hull (1972). Reduction in Genetics--Biology or Philosophy? Philosophy of Science 39 (4):491-499.score: 30.0
    A belief common among philosophers and biologists alike is that Mendelian genetics has been or is in the process of being reduced to molecular genetics, in the sense of formal theory reduction current in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to show that there are numerous empirical and conceptual difficulties which stand in the way of establishing a systematic inferential relation between Mendelian and molecular genetics. These difficulties, however, have little to do with the traditional objections which have (...)
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  48. David L. Hull (1994). Ernst Mayr's Influence on the History and Philosophy of Biology: A Personal Memoir. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 9 (3):375-386.score: 30.0
    Mayr has made both conceptual and professional contributions to the establishment of the history and philosophy of biology. His conceptual contributions include, among many others, the notion of population thinking. He has also played an important role in the establishment of history and philosophy of biology as viable professional disciplines.
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  49. David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.) (2007). The Cambridge Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    The philosophy of biology is one of the most exciting new areas in the field of philosophy and one that is attracting much attention from working scientists. This Companion, edited by two of the founders of the field, includes newly commissioned essays by senior scholars and up-and-coming younger scholars who collectively examine the main areas of the subject - the nature of evolutionary theory, classification, teleology and function, ecology, and the problematic relationship between biology and religion, among other topics. Up-to-date (...)
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  50. David L. Hull (1969). What Philosophy of Biology is Not. Synthese 20 (2):157 - 184.score: 30.0
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