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Louise McHugh [3]Louise A. McHugh [1]
  1. Liv Kosnes, Robert Whelan, Aoife O'Donovan & Louise A. McHugh (2013). Implicit Measurement of Positive and Negative Future Thinking as a Predictor of Depressive Symptoms and Hopelessness. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):898-912.
    Research using explicit measures has linked decreased positive future thinking, but not increased negative future thinking, with clinical depression. However, individuals may be unable or unwilling to express thoughts about the future, and can be unaware of implicit beliefs that can influence their behavior. Implicit measures of cognition may shed light on the role of future thinking in depression. To our knowledge, the current study presents the first implicit measure of positive and negative future thinking. A sample of 71 volunteers (...)
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  2. Jo Saunders, Kali Barawi & Louise McHugh (2013). Mindfulness Increases Recall of Self-Threatening Information. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1375-1383.
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  3. Nic Hooper, Nathan Davies, Laura Davies & Louise McHugh (2011). Comparing Thought Suppression and Mindfulness as Coping Techniques for Spider Fear. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1824-1830.
    The current study compared thought suppression, focused attention and unfocused attention as strategies for managing spider fear. Spider fearful participants were exposed to a strategy induction before completing a Behavioural Approach Test . The BAT is a 10 step measurement of how close participants are willing to move towards a spider. Participants were instructed to use what they learned in the pre-BAT induction to help them advance through the steps of the BAT. The results of the study indicated that participants (...)
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  4. Simon Dymond & Louise McHugh (2005). Symbolic Behavior and Perspective-Taking Are Forms of Derived Relational Responding and Can Be Learned. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):697-697.
    Numerous questions remain unanswered concerning the functional determinants of symbolic behavior and perspective-taking, particularly regarding the capabilities of children with autism. An alternative approach that considers these behaviors to be forms of derived relational responding allows for the design of functional intervention programs to establish such repertoires in individuals for whom they are absent.
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