Search results for 'Lucas Bergkamp' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Lucas Bergkamp (University of Malta)
  1.  1
    Lucas Bergkamp (1989). The Rise of Research Ethics Committees in Western Europe:Some Concomitant Problems. Bioethics 3 (2):122–134.
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  2.  1
    Lucas Bergkamp (forthcoming). American IRBs and Dutch Research Ethics Committees: How They Compare. IRB: Ethics & Human Research.
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  3. John Lucas (2003). Lucas Against Mechanism: A Rejoinder. Etica E Politica 5 (1):1.
    Coder’s argument is very similar to Lewis’ one: he maintains that some human beings are not able to follow Gödel’s theorem, so Lucas’ argument cannot show that their minds are not machines. The answer of Lucas is that one proposed against Lewis’ criticism, that is that Mechanism makes a universal claim and so a single counter-example – a single mind producing a singe truth not recognizable by any machine – is a disproof for it.
     
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  4.  27
    Billy Joe Lucas (2002). Logical Constructivism, Modal Logic, and Metaphysics: A Reply to Professor Pruss' ``Professor Lucas' Second Epistemic Way''. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 52 (3):143-157.
  5.  13
    J. R. Lucas (1984). Lucas, Godel and Astaire: A Rejoinder. Philosophical Quarterly 34 (137):507-508.
  6.  12
    John R. Lucas (1984). Lucas Against Mechanism II: A Rejoinder. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 14 (June):189-91.
  7.  14
    J. R. Lucas (1998). Transcendental Tense: J.R. Lucas. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):45–56.
  8.  15
    Billy Joe Lucas (1997). The Second Epistemic Way Revisited: Reply to Professor Beard's, 'Professor Lucas on Omniscience'. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 42 (3):143-162.
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  9. J. R. Lucas (1973). ‘Because You Are a Woman’: J. R. Lucas. Philosophy 48 (184):161-171.
    Plato was the first feminist. In the Republic he puts forward the view that women are just the same as men, only not quite so good. It is a view which has often been expressed in recent years, and generates strong passions. Some of these have deep biological origins, which a philosopher can only hope to recognize and not to assuage. But much of the heat engendered is due to unnecessary friction between views which are certainly compatible and probably correct. (...)
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  10. J. R. Lucas (1977). Against Equality Again: J. R. Lucas. Philosophy 52 (201):255-280.
    Equality in the present age has become an idol, in much the same way as property was in the age of Locke. Many people worship it, and think that it provides the key to the proper understanding of politics, and that on it alone can a genuinely just society be reconstructed. This is a mistake. Although, like property, it is a useful concept, and although, like property, there are occasions when we want to have it in practice, it is not (...)
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  11. Richard Lucas (1717). An Enquiry After Happiness, by the Author of Practical Christianity. By R. Lucas.
     
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  12. J. R. Lucas (1993). A Mind of One's Own: J. R. Lucas. Philosophy 68 (266):457-471.
    Whatever good or ill it did to Guy Fawkes, his resuscitation at the hands of Bernard Williams has, by any utilitarian reckoning, been a Good Thing. A casual glance at the literature that has accumulated over the past thirty-five years leaves no doubt that the topic has been reduplicated many times over, to the great enjoyment of undergraduates, who have been able to write science fiction under the guise of essays in the Philosophy of Mind, and of dons, who in (...)
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  13. Richard Lucas (1717). Humane Life: Or, a Second Part of the Enquiry After Happiness, by the Author of Practical Christianity. By R. Lucas.
     
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  14. Richard Lucas (1717). Religious Perfection: Or, a 3rd Part of the Enquiry After Happiness, by the Author of Practical Christianity. By R. Lucas.
     
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  15.  4
    John Lucas (2003). Minds, Machines and Gödel. Etica E Politica 5 (1):1.
    In this article, Lucas maintains the falseness of Mechanism - the attempt to explain minds as machines - by means of Incompleteness Theorem of Gödel. Gödel’s theorem shows that in any system consistent and adequate for simple arithmetic there are formulae which cannot be proved in the system but that human minds can recognize as true; Lucas points out in his turn that Gödel’s theorem applies to machines because a machine is the concrete instantiation of a formal system: (...)
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  16.  46
    J. R. Lucas (1995). Responsibility. Clarendon Press.
    Responsibility is a key concept in our moral, social, and political thinking, but it is not itself properly understood. J.R. Lucas here presents a lively, broad, and accessible discussion of responsibility in various areas of human life, from personal and sexual relations to politics.
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  17.  92
    John Lucas (2003). The Gödelian Argument: Turn Over the Page. Etica E Politica 5 (1):1.
    In this paper Lucas suggests that many of his critics have not read carefully neither his exposition nor Penrose’s one, so they seek to refute arguments they never proposed. Therefore he offers a brief history of the Gödelian argument put forward by Gödel, Penrose and Lucas itself: Gödel argued indeed that either mathematics is incompletable – that is axioms can never be comprised in a finite rule and so human mind surpasses the power of any finite machine – (...)
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  18.  15
    J. R. Lucas (2000). The Conceptual Roots of Mathematics: An Essay on the Philosophy of Mathematics. Routledge.
    The Conceptual Roots of Mathematics is a comprehensive study of the foundation of mathematics. Lucas, one of the most distinguished Oxford scholars, covers a vast amount of ground in the philosophy of mathematics, showing us that it is actually at the heart of the study of epistemology and metaphysics.
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  19. J. Lucas (2003). The Implications of Gödel Theorem. Etica E Politica 5 (1):1.
    After a brief and informal explanation of the Gödel’s theorem as a version of the Epimenides’ paradox applied to Elementary Number Theory formulated in first-order logic, Lucas shows some of the most relevant consequences of this theorem, such as the impossibility to define truth in terms of provability and so the failure of Verificationist and Intuitionist arguments. He shows moreover how Gödel’s theorem proves that first-order arithmetic admits non-standard models, that Hilbert’s programme is untenable and that second-order logic is (...)
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  20.  48
    J. R. Lucas, .
    There was once a leak from Hebdomadal Council. The Assessor told her husband, who told my wife, who told me that Monday afternoon had been spent discussing what Lucas would say if various courses of action were adopted, leading to the conclusion that it would be best to do nothing. I was flattered, but a bit surprised. The tide of philosophical scepticism had ebbed, and it was generally allowed that a reasonable way of discovering what someone would say was (...)
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  21.  2
    Brian Lucas (2015). Connected Toward Communion: The Church and Social Communication in the Digital Age [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 92 (4):506.
    Lucas, Brian Review of: Connected toward communion: The church and social communication in the digital age, by Daniella Zsupan-Jerome, Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2014, pp. 130, paperback, $36.95.
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  22.  47
    J. R. Lucas, The Huxley-Wilberforce Debate Revisited.
    According to the legend, Bishop Wilberforce at a meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science in Oxford on Saturday, June 30th, 1860, turned to Thomas Huxley, and asked him ``Is it on your grandfather's or your grandmother's side that you claim descent from a monkey''; whereupon Huxley delivered a devastating rebuke, thereby establishing the primacy of scientific truth over ecclesiastical obscurantism. Although the legend is historically untrue in almost every detail, its persistence suggests that it may nonetheless (...)
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  23.  1
    Brian Lucas (2015). Soldier of Christ: The Life of Pope Pius XII [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 92 (4):503.
    Lucas, Brian Review of: Soldier of Christ: The life of pope Pius XII, by Robert A. Ventresca, Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2013, pp. 405, hardback, US$35.00.
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  24.  11
    Brian Lucas (2013). Religious Confession Privilege and the Common Law [Book Review]. The Australasian Catholic Record 90 (1):113.
    Lucas, Brian Review(s) of: Religious confession privilege and the common law, by Keith Thompson (Leiden: Matinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2011), pp.395, E135.00.
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  25. J. R. Lucas (1996). Minds, Machines, and Gödel: A Retrospect. In P. J. R. Millican & A. Clark (eds.), Etica E Politica. Clarendon Press 1.
    In this paper Lucas comes back to Gödelian argument against Mecanism to clarify some points. First of all, he explains his use of Gödel’s theorem instead of Turing’s theorem, showing how Gödel’ theorem, but not Turing’s theorem, raises questions concerning truth and reasoning that bear on the nature of mind and how Turing’s theorem suggests that there is something that cannot be done by any computers but not that it can be done by human minds. He considers moreover how (...)
     
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  26.  11
    J. R. Lucas, I Have Recently Had an E-Mail From Mr Evin Harris of Trinity College Dublin.
    Dear Mr. Lucas, I was wondering if you had come across Query 44 of George Berkeley's ``Analyst: A discourse addressed to an infidel mathematician"?. It reads: ``Whether the difference between a mere computer and a man of science be not that one computes on principles clearly conceived and by rules evidently demonstrated, whereas the other [i.e a man] doth not?" Not bad for 1734!
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  27.  6
    Brian Lucas (2012). The Price of Freedom: Edmund Rice Educational Leader [Book Review]. The Australasian Catholic Record 89 (1):121.
    Lucas, Brian Review(s) of: The price of freedom: Edmund Rice educational leader, by Denis McLaughlin, East Kew: David Lovell Publishing, 2007, pp.397, $45.00.
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  28.  1
    Brian Lucas (2015). Not-for-Profit Law: Theoretical and Comparative Perspectives [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 92 (1):120.
    Lucas, Brian Review of: Not-for-profit law: Theoretical and comparative perspectives, by ed. Matthew Harding, Ann O'Connell and Miranda Stewart, pp. 396, ebook $125.40, hardback $175.00.
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  29.  3
    Brian Lucas (2011). Pope Benedict XVI and the Sexual Abuse Crisis - Working for Reform and Renewal [Book Review]. The Australasian Catholic Record 88 (3):381.
    Lucas, Brian Review(s) of: Pope benedict XVI and the sexual abuse crisis - working for reform and renewal, Gregory Erlandson and Matthew Bunson, (Huntington, Indiana: Our Sunday Visitor Publishing Division, 2010), pb, pp.207.
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  30.  1
    John Lucas (2003). This Gödel is Killing Me: A Rejoinder. Etica E Politica 5 (1):1.
    Hutton asserts that Lucas’ use of Gödel’s theorem against Mechanism is incorrect because of the impossibility to assume human minds’ consistency: he tries to show that there is a non-zero probability of a mind’s embracing mutually inconsistent propositions; moreover Hutton maintains that the request of human minds’ consistency is a request of infallibility. Lucas replies that the mistake of Hutton’s argument consists in his assigning probabilities to a mind’s accepting any proposition without considering what that mind has done (...)
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  31.  4
    Brian Lucas (2012). The Episcopal Conference in the Communications Marketplace: Issues and Challenges for Catholic Identity and Ecclesiology. The Australasian Catholic Record 89 (4):408.
    Lucas, Brian This article deals with the role of the Episcopal Conference in the area of social communications and the tensions that arise with respect to the respective roles of the diocesan bishop and the Episcopal Conference, including lay heads of ecclesial agencies, in presenting 'the face of the Church' in the public forum. The article is divided into two sections: i)The Church as 'visible institution' and the ecclesiological and juridical foundations for identifying those who represent it in the (...)
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  32.  5
    Hello John Lucas, About Me.
    Hello Mr John Lucas, I go to school in Perth in Western Australia. In the subject mathematics at my school, we were given a project to research a given mathematician and write a report on them. I was given you. I have to incorporate some information about the mathematical times in which you live and to attempt to include details of the contribution that you made to the field of mathematics. I also have to include a short biography of (...)
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  33.  6
    J. R. Lucas (1997). Comments: Reality and Time. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 11 (1):97 – 108.
    (1997). Comments: Reality and time. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science: Vol. 11, Festschrift for J. R. Lucas, pp. 97-108. doi: 10.1080/02698599708573553.
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  34. John Lucas (2003). A Simple Exposition Of Gödel's Theorem. Etica E Politica 5 (1):1.
    Lucas introduces this paper by an account of how he began to be interested to questions about Materialism and Mechanism. Then he suggests a simple version of the Incompleteness theorem of Gödel, showing how this theorem proposes a version of the Epimenides’ paradox able to avoid the circularity of this paradox by means of the possibility to express meta-mathematics in terms of arithmetical propositions and by substituting questions concerning truth by questions concerning provability.
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  35. J. R. Lucas (2011). Conceptual Roots of Mathematics. Routledge.
    The Conceptual Roots of Mathematics is a comprehensive study of the foundation of mathematics. J.R. Lucas, one of the most distinguished Oxford scholars, covers a vast amount of ground in the philosophy of mathematics, showing us that it is actually at the heart of the study of epistemology and metaphysics.
     
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  36. J. R. Lucas (2002). Conceptual Roots of Mathematics. Routledge.
    _The Conceptual Roots of Mathematics_ is a comprehensive study of the foundation of mathematics. J.R. Lucas, one of the most distinguished Oxford scholars, covers a vast amount of ground in the philosophy of mathematics, showing us that it is actually at the heart of the study of epistemology and metaphysics.
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  37. J. R. Lucas (1999). Conceptual Roots of Mathematics. Routledge.
    _The Conceptual Roots of Mathematics_ is a comprehensive study of the foundation of mathematics. J.R. Lucas, one of the most distinguished Oxford scholars, covers a vast amount of ground in the philosophy of mathematics, showing us that it is actually at the heart of the study of epistemology and metaphysics.
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  38. George Lucas (2017). Ethics and Cyber Warfare: The Quest for Responsible Security in the Age of Digital Warfare. Oxford University Press Usa.
    From North Korea's recent attacks on Sony to perpetual news reports of successful hackings and criminal theft, cyber conflict has emerged as a major topic of public concern. Yet even as attacks on military, civilian, and commercial targets have escalated, there is not yet a clear set of ethical guidelines that apply to cyber warfare. Indeed, like terrorism, cyber warfare is commonly believed to be a war without rules. Given the prevalence cyber warfare, developing a practical moral code for this (...)
     
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  39. J. R. Lucas (2003). Knowing the Unknowable God: How Faith Thrives on Divine Mystery. Waterbrook Press.
    Meet the God Who Is Greater Than Your Biggest Questions. The Bible never shies away from seeming contradictions. We are told both to resist our enemies and to love them, and that our all-knowing God can sometimes forget. Unable to reconcile such biblical paradoxes, some people abandon Christianity, while others pretend that the seeming contradictions don’t exist–preferring to believe in an uncomplicated, easy-to-comprehend God. Yet countless others are hungry for new insight into the God behind the Bible’s mysterious paradoxes. Responding (...)
     
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  40. George Lucas (2016). Military Ethics: What Everyone Needs to Know. Oxford University Press Usa.
    What significance does "ethics" have for the men and women serving in the military forces of nations around the world? What core values and moral principles collectively guide the members of this "military profession?" This book explains these essential moral foundations, along with "just war theory," international relations, and international law. The ethical foundations that define the "Profession of Arms" have developed over millennia from the shared moral values, unique role responsibilities, and occasional reflection by individual members the profession on (...)
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  41. John R. Lucas (1961). Minds, Machines and Godel. Philosophy 36 (April-July):112-127.
    Goedel's theorem states that in any consistent system which is strong enough to produce simple arithmetic there are formulae which cannot be proved-in-the-system, but which we can see to be true. Essentially, we consider the formula which says, in effect, "This formula is unprovable-in-the-system". If this formula were provable-in-the-system, we should have a contradiction: for if it were provablein-the-system, then it would not be unprovable-in-the-system, so that "This formula is unprovable-in-the-system" would be false: equally, if it were provable-in-the-system, then it (...)
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  42. Tim Thornton & Peter Lucas (2011). On the Very Idea of a Recovery Model for Mental Health. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (1):24-28.
    The recovery model has been put forward as a rival to the biomedical model in mental healthcare. It has also been invoked in debate about public policy for individual and community mental health and the broader goal of social inclusion. But this broader use threatens its status as a genuine model, distinct from others such as the biomedical model. This paper sets out to articulate, although not to defend, a distinct recovery model based on the idea that mental health is (...)
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  43.  23
    Christopher G. Lucas & Thomas L. Griffiths (2010). Learning the Form of Causal Relationships Using Hierarchical Bayesian Models. Cognitive Science 34 (1):113-147.
  44. Laura Lucas (2012). Les Clàssiques I Els Blocs. Methodos 1:287.
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  45. John R. Lucas (1989). The Future: An Essay on God, Temporality, and Truth. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers.
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  46. Daniel Gluschankof & François Lucas (1993). Hyper-Regular Lattice-Ordered Groups. Journal of Symbolic Logic 58 (4):1342-1358.
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  47.  49
    P. G. Lucas (1954). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 63 (251):278-279.
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  48. J. R. Lucas (1969). Euclides Ab Omni Naevo Vindicatus. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 20 (1):1-11.
    The issue is obscured by the fact that the word `space' can be used in four different ways. It can be used, first, as a term of pure mathematics, as when mathematicians talk of an `n-dimensional phase-space', an `n-dimensional vector-space', a `three-dimensional projective space' or a `twodimensional Riemannian space'. In this sense the word `space' means the totality of the abstract entities-the `points'-implicitly defined by the axioms. There is no doubt that there exist, iii this sense, non-Euclidean spaces, because all (...)
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  49. J. R. Lucas (1990). Spacetime and Electromagnetism: An Essay on the Philosophy of the Special Theory of Relativity. Oxford University Press.
    That space and time should be integrated into a single entity, spacetime, is the great insight of Einstein's special theory of relativity, and leads us to regard spacetime as a fundamental context in which to make sense of the world around us. But it is not the only one. Causality is equally important and at least as far as the special theory goes, it cannot be subsumed under a fundamentally geometrical form of explanation. In fact, the agent of propagation of (...)
     
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  50.  23
    J. R. Lucas, Wilberforce and Huxley: A Legendary Encounter.
    The legend of the encounter between Wilberforce and Huxley is well established. Almost every scientist knows, and every viewer of the BBC's recent programme on Darwin was shown,* how Samuel Wilberforce, bishop of Oxford, attempted to pour scorn on Darwin's Origin of Species at a meeting of the British Association in Oxford on 30 June 1860, and had the tables turned on him by T. H. Huxley. In this memorable encounter Huxley's simple scientific sincerity humbled the prelatical insolence and clerical (...)
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