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Profile: Lucas Introna (Lancaster University)
  1. Lucas D. Introna (2009). Ethics and the Speaking of Things. Theory, Culture and Society 26 (4):398-419.
    This article is about our relationship with things; about the abundant material geographies that surround us and constitute the very possibility for us to be the beings that we are. More specifically, it is about the question of the possibility of an ethical encounter with things (qua things). We argue, with the science and technology studies tradition (and Latour in particular), that we are the beings that we are through our entanglements with things, we are thoroughly hybrid beings, cyborgs through (...)
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  2. Lucas D. Introna (2009). The 'Measure of a Man' and the Ethos of Hospitality: Towards an Ethical Dwelling with Technology. [REVIEW] AI and Society 25 (1):93-102.
    In this paper, I argue for the impossible possibility of an ethical dwelling with technology. In arguing for an ethical comportment in our dealing with technology, I am not only arguing for the consideration of the ethical implications of technology (which we already do) but also, and more importantly, for an ethics of technological artefacts qua technology. Thus, I attempt to argue for a decentering (or rather overcoming) of anthropocentric ethics, urging us to move beyond any centre, whatever it may (...)
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  3. Martin Brigham & Lucas D. Introna (2007). Invoking Politics and Ethics in the Design of Information Technology: Undesigning the Design. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 9 (1):1-10.
    It is a truism that the design and deployment of information and communication technologies is vital to everyday life, the conduct of work and to social order. But how are individual, organisational and societal choices made? What might it mean to invoke a politics and an ethics of information technology design and use? This editorial paper situates these questions within the trajectory of preoccupations and approaches to the design and deployment of information technology since computerisation began in the 1940s. Focusing (...)
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  4. Lucas D. Introna (2007). Maintaining the Reversibility of Foldings: Making the Ethics (Politics) of Information Technology Visible. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 9 (1):11-25.
    This paper will address the question of the morality of technology. I believe this is an important question for our contemporary society in which technology, especially information technology, is increasingly becoming the default mode of social ordering. I want to suggest that the conventional manner of conceptualising the morality of technology is inadequate – even dangerous. The conventional view of technology is that technology represents technical means to achieve social ends. Thus, the moral problem of technology, from this perspective, is (...)
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  5. Lucas D. Introna (2007). Singular Justice and Software Piracy. Business Ethics 16 (3):264–277.
    This paper assumes that the purpose of ethics is to open up a space for the possibility of moral conduct in the flow of everyday life. If this is the case then we can legitimately ask: "How then do we do ethics"? To attempt an answer to this important question, the paper presents some suggestions from the work of Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida. With Levinas, it is argued that ethics happens in the singularity of the face of the Other (...)
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  6. Lucas D. Introna & Fernando M. Ilharco (2006). On the Meaning of Screens: Towards a Phenomenological Account of Screenness. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (1):57 - 76.
    This paper presents a Heideggerian phenomenological analysis of screens. In a world and an epoch where screens pervade a great many aspects of human experience, we submit that phenomenology, much in a traditional methodological form, can provide an interesting and novel basis for our understanding of screens. We ground our analysis in the ontology of Martin Heidegger's Being and Time [1927/1962], claiming that screens will only show themselves as they are if taken as screens-in-the-world. Thus, the phenomenon of screen is (...)
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  7. Niall Hayes & Lucas D. Introna (2005). Cultural Values, Plagiarism, and Fairness: When Plagiarism Gets in the Way of Learning. Ethics and Behavior 15 (3):213 – 231.
    The dramatic increase in the number of overseas students studying in the United Kingdom and other Western countries has required academics to reevaluate many aspects of their own, and their institutions', practices. This article considers differing cultural values among overseas students toward plagiarism and the implications this may have for postgraduate education in a Western context. Based on focus-group interviews, questionnaires, and informal discussions, we report the views of plagiarism among students in 2 postgraduate management programs, both of which had (...)
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  8. Lucas D. Introna (2005). Disclosive Ethics and Information Technology: Disclosing Facial Recognition Systems. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 7 (2):75-86.
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  9. Lucas D. Introna (2005). Disclosing the Digital Face: The Ethics of Facial Recognition Systems. Ethics and Information Technology 7 (2):75-86.
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  10. William A. Galston, Thomas C. Hilde, Lucas D. Introna, Peter Levine, Eric M. Uslaner, Helen Nissenbaum & Robert Wachbroit (2004). The Internet in Public Life. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  11. Lucas D. Introna & Antonio Marturano (2002). Editorial. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (2):155-156.
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  12. Lucas D. Introna (2001). Editorial. Ethics and Information Technology 3 (3):155-156.
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  13. Lucas D. Introna (2001). Virtuality and Morality. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8 (1):31-39.
    This paper critically describes the mediation of social relations by information technology, drawing on the work of Emmanuel Levinas. In the first of three movements, I discuss ethical relations as primordial sociality based in proximity. In the second movement I discuss the how the self encounters the Other, the ethical contact. How can the self make contact with the Other without turning the Other into a theme, a concept or a category? In the third movement, I discuss the electronic mediation (...)
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  14. Lucas D. Introna (2000). Editorial: Ethical Reflections on the Virtual Frontier. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 2 (1):1-2.
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  15. Lucas D. Introna (2000). Workplace Surveillance, Privacy and Distributive Justice. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 30 (4):33-39.
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  16. Herman T. Tavani & Lucas D. Introna (1999). Computer Ethics: Philosophical Enquiry. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 29 (1):4-8.
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  17. Lucas D. Introna (1997). On Cyberspace and Being. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 4 (1/2):16-25.
    Does it make sense to talk about cyberspace as an alternative social reality? Is cyberspace the new frontier for the realization of the postmodern self? For philosophers Taylor and Saarinen, and the psychologist Turkle, cyberspace is the practical manifestation of a postmodern reality, or rather hyperreality (Baudrillard). In hyperreal cyberspace, they argue, identity becomes plastic, “I can change my self as easily as I change my clothes.” I will argue using Martin Heidegger that our being is being-in-the-world. To be-in-the-world means (...)
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  18. Lucas D. Introna (1997). Privacy and the Computer: Why We Need Privacy in the Information Society. Metaphilosophy 28 (3):259-275.
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