Search results for 'Lucas Parsons' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rhett Diessner, Teri Rust, Rebecca Solom, Nellie Frost & Lucas Parsons (2006). Beauty and Hope: A Moral Beauty Intervention. Journal of Moral Education 35 (3):301-317.score: 240.0
  2. Billy Joe Lucas (2002). Logical Constructivism, Modal Logic, and Metaphysics: A Reply to Professor Pruss' ``Professor Lucas' Second Epistemic Way''. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 52 (3):143-157.score: 180.0
  3. J. R. Lucas (1998). Transcendental Tense: J.R. Lucas. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):45–56.score: 180.0
  4. J. R. Lucas (1984). Lucas, Godel and Astaire: A Rejoinder. Philosophical Quarterly 34 (137):507-508.score: 180.0
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  5. Billy Joe Lucas (1997). The Second Epistemic Way Revisited: Reply to Professor Beard's, 'Professor Lucas on Omniscience'. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 42 (3):143-162.score: 180.0
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  6. John R. Lucas (1984). Lucas Against Mechanism II: A Rejoinder. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 14 (June):189-91.score: 180.0
  7. Toshi W. Parsons (2003). James D. Parsons, 1918-2001. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 76 (5):165 - 166.score: 180.0
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  8. Charles Parsons (2008). Mathematical Thought and its Objects. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    In Mathematical Thought and Its Objects, Charles Parsons examines the notion of object, with the aim to navigate between nominalism, denying that distinctively mathematical objects exist, and forms of Platonism that postulate a transcendent realm of such objects. He introduces the central mathematical notion of structure and defends a version of the structuralist view of mathematical objects, according to which their existence is relative to a structure and they have no more of a “nature” than that confers on them.
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  9. J. R. Lucas, The Open Society €“ and ..score: 60.0
    There was once a leak from Hebdomadal Council. The Assessor told her husband, who told my wife, who told me that Monday afternoon had been spent discussing what Lucas would say if various courses of action were adopted, leading to the conclusion that it would be best to do nothing. I was flattered, but a bit surprised. The tide of philosophical scepticism had ebbed, and it was generally allowed that a reasonable way of discovering what someone would say (...)
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  10. J. R. Lucas, The Huxley-Wilberforce Debate Revisited.score: 60.0
    According to the legend, Bishop Wilberforce (``Soapy Sam'') at a meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science in Oxford on Saturday, June 30th, 1860, turned to Thomas Huxley, and asked him ``Is it on your grandfather's or your grandmother's side that you claim descent from a monkey''; whereupon Huxley delivered a devastating rebuke, thereby establishing the primacy of scientific truth over ecclesiastical obscurantism. Although the legend is historically untrue in almost every detail, its persistence suggests that (...)
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  11. Terence Parsons (2000). Indeterminate Identity: Metaphysics and Semantics. Clarendon Press.score: 60.0
    Terence Parsons presents a lively and controversial study of philosophical questions about identity. Because many puzzles about identity remain unsolved, some people believe that they are questions that have no answers and that there is a problem with the language used to formulate them. Parsons explores a different possibility: that such puzzles lack answers because of the way the world is (or because of the way the world is not). He claims that there is genuine indeterminacy of identity (...)
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  12. Michael Parsons (2000). The Dove That Returns, the Dove That Vanishes: Paradox and Creativity in Psychoanalysis. Routledge.score: 60.0
    The nature of psychoanalysis seems contradictory - deeply personal, subjective and intuitive, yet requiring systematic theory and principles of technique. The objective quality of psychoanalytic knowledge is paradoxically dependent on the personal engagement of the knower with what is known. In The Dove that Returns, The Dove that Vanishes , Michael Parsons explores the tension of this paradox. As they respond to it, and struggle to sustain it creatively, analysts discover their individual identities. The work of outstanding clinicians such (...)
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  13. Glenn Parsons (2008). Teaching & Learning Guide For: The Aesthetics of Nature. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):1106-1112.score: 60.0
    Traditionally, analytic philosophers writing on aesthetics have given short shrift to nature. The last thirty years, however, have seen a steady growth of interest in this area. The essays and books now available cover central philosophical issues concerning the nature of the aesthetic and the existence of norms for aesthetic judgement. They also intersect with important issues in environmental philosophy. More recent contributions have opened up new topics, such as the relationship between natural sound and music, the beauty of animals, (...)
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  14. Kurt Gödel, Solomon Feferman, Charles Parsons & Stephen G. Simpson (eds.) (2010). Kurt Gödel: Essays for His Centennial. Association for Symbolic Logic.score: 60.0
    Machine generated contents note: Part I. General: 1. The Gödel editorial project: a synopsis Solomon Feferman; 2. Future tasks for Gödel scholars John W. Dawson, Jr., and Cheryl A. Dawson; Part II. Proof Theory: 3. Kurt Gödel and the metamathematical tradition Jeremy Avigad; 4. Only two letters: the correspondence between Herbrand and Gödel Wilfried Sieg; 5. Gödel's reformulation of Gentzen's first consistency proof for arithmetic: the no-counter-example interpretation W. W. Tait; 6. Gödel on intuition and on Hilbert's finitism W. W. (...)
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  15. William Barclay Parsons (1999). The Enigma of the Oceanic Feeling: Revisioning the Psychoanalytic Theory of Mysticism. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This study examines the history of the psychoanalytic theory of mysticism, starting with the seminal correspondence between Freud and Romain Rolland concerning the concept of "oceanic feeling." Providing a corrective to current views which frame psychoanalysis as pathologizing mysticism, Parsons reveals the existence of three models entertained by Freud and Rolland: the classical reductive, ego-adaptive, and transformational (which allows for a transcendent dimension to mysticism). Then, reconstructing Rolland's personal mysticism (the "oceanic feeling") through texts and letters unavailable to Freud, (...)
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  16. Brian Lucas (2013). Religious Confession Privilege and the Common Law [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 90 (1):113.score: 60.0
    Lucas, Brian Review(s) of: Religious confession privilege and the common law, by Keith Thompson (Leiden: Matinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2011), pp.395, E135.00.
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  17. J. R. Lucas (2000). The Conceptual Roots of Mathematics: An Essay on the Philosophy of Mathematics. Routledge.score: 60.0
    The Conceptual Roots of Mathematics is a comprehensive study of the foundation of mathematics. Lucas, one of the most distinguished Oxford scholars, covers a vast amount of ground in the philosophy of mathematics, showing us that it is actually at the heart of the study of epistemology and metaphysics.
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  18. Keith M. Parsons (2000). Further Reflections on the Argument From Reason. Philo 3 (1):90-102.score: 60.0
    In this essay I respond to the critical remarks made by Prof. Reppert in “Reply to Parsons and Lippard on the Argument from Reason” (present issue). I also provide a critique of Reppert’s original article, “The Argument from Reason,” in Philo vol. 2, no. 1 (Spring-Summer 1999).
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  19. J. R. Lucas, I Have Recently Had an E-Mail From Mr Evin Harris of Trinity College Dublin:.score: 60.0
    Dear Mr. Lucas, I was wondering if you had come across Query 44 of George Berkeley's ``Analyst: A discourse addressed to an infidel mathematician"?. It reads: ``Whether the difference between a mere computer and a man of science be not that one computes on principles clearly conceived and by rules evidently demonstrated, whereas the other [i.e a man] doth not?" Not bad for 1734!
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  20. Brian Lucas (2012). The Price of Freedom: Edmund Rice Educational Leader [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 89 (1):121.score: 60.0
    Lucas, Brian Review(s) of: The price of freedom: Edmund Rice educational leader, by Denis McLaughlin, East Kew: David Lovell Publishing, 2007, pp.397, $45.00.
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  21. Terence Parsons (2014). Articulating Medieval Logic. Oup Oxford.score: 60.0
    Terence Parsons presents a new study of the development and continuing value of medieval logic, which expanded Aristotle's basic principles of logic in important ways. Parsons argues that the resulting system is as rich as contemporary first-order symbolic logic.
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  22. Hello John Lucas, About Me.score: 60.0
    Hello Mr John Lucas, I go to school in Perth in Western Australia. In the subject mathematics at my school, we were given a project to research a given mathematician and write a report on them. I was given you. I have to incorporate some information about the mathematical times in which you live and to attempt to include details of the contribution that you made to the field of mathematics. I also have to include a short biography (...)
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  23. J. R. Lucas (1997). Comments: Reality and Time. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 11 (1):97 – 108.score: 60.0
    (1997). Comments: Reality and time. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science: Vol. 11, Festschrift for J. R. Lucas, pp. 97-108. doi: 10.1080/02698599708573553.
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  24. Brian Lucas (2012). The Episcopal Conference in the Communications Marketplace: Issues and Challenges for Catholic Identity and Ecclesiology. Australasian Catholic Record, The 89 (4):408.score: 60.0
    Lucas, Brian This article deals with the role of the Episcopal Conference in the area of social communications and the tensions that arise with respect to the respective roles of the diocesan bishop and the Episcopal Conference, including lay heads of ecclesial agencies, in presenting 'the face of the Church' in the public forum. The article is divided into two sections: i)The Church as 'visible institution' and the ecclesiological and juridical foundations for identifying those who represent it in the (...)
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  25. Brian Lucas (2011). Pope Benedict XVI and the Sexual Abuse Crisis - Working for Reform and Renewal [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 88 (3):381.score: 60.0
    Lucas, Brian Review(s) of: Pope benedict XVI and the sexual abuse crisis - working for reform and renewal, Gregory Erlandson and Matthew Bunson, (Huntington, Indiana: Our Sunday Visitor Publishing Division, 2010), pb, pp.207.
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  26. J. R. Lucas (2011). Conceptual Roots of Mathematics. Routledge.score: 60.0
    The Conceptual Roots of Mathematics is a comprehensive study of the foundation of mathematics. J.R. Lucas, one of the most distinguished Oxford scholars, covers a vast amount of ground in the philosophy of mathematics, showing us that it is actually at the heart of the study of epistemology and metaphysics.
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  27. J. R. Lucas (2003). Knowing the Unknowable God: How Faith Thrives on Divine Mystery. Waterbrook Press.score: 60.0
    Meet the God Who Is Greater Than Your Biggest Questions. The Bible never shies away from seeming contradictions. We are told both to resist our enemies and to love them, and that our all-knowing God can sometimes forget. Unable to reconcile such biblical paradoxes, some people abandon Christianity, while others pretend that the seeming contradictions don’t exist–preferring to believe in an uncomplicated, easy-to-comprehend God. Yet countless others are hungry for new insight into the God behind the Bible’s mysterious paradoxes. Responding (...)
     
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  28. J. R. Lucas (1995). Responsibility. Clarendon Press.score: 60.0
    Responsibility is a key concept in our moral, social and political thinking, but is not itself properly understood. In this book J R Lucas elucidates it in terms of answerability - the obligation to answer the question 'Why did you do it?' He develops this account to include negative responsiblity - 'Why did you not do something about it?' - and share responsibility, which together yield the rationale of political responsibility. In disentangling these two strands of argument, he points (...)
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  29. Keith M. Parsons (2005). Copernican Questions: A Concise Invitation to the Philosophy of Science. Mcgraw-Hill.score: 60.0
    This provocative, focused, and succinct new text addresses two issues integral to the study of the philosophy of science: the rationality of science and the realism question. Students are invited to think deeply about salient issues as they explore collections of cases and examples, beginning by considering the founding document of modern science, Copernicus’s On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres , and including discussions of other key readings such as Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions . Author Keith (...)
     
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  30. Josh Parsons (2004). Distributional Properties. In Frank Jackson & Graham Priest (eds.), Lewisian Themes: The Philosophy of David K. Lewis. Clarendon Press.score: 30.0
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  31. Charles Parsons (1990). The Structuralist View of Mathematical Objects. Synthese 84 (3):303 - 346.score: 30.0
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  32. Josh Parsons (2007). 7. Theories of Location. Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 3:201.score: 30.0
  33. Charles Parsons (1995). Platonism and Mathematical Intuition in Kurt Gödel's Thought. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 1 (1):44-74.score: 30.0
  34. J. R. Lucas, The Unity of Science Without Reductionism.score: 30.0
    The Unity of Science is often thought to be reductionist, but this is because we fail to distinguish questions from answers. The questions asked by different sciences are different---the biologist is interested in different topics from the physicist, and seeks different explanations---but the answers are not peculiar to each particular science, and can range over the whole of scientific knowledge. The biologist is interested in organisms--- concept unknown to physics---but explains physiological processes in terms of chemistry, not a mysterious vital (...)
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  35. Josh Parsons (2002). A-Theory for B-Theorists. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206):1-20.score: 30.0
    The debate between A-theory and B-theory in the philosophy of time is a persistent one. It is not always clear, however, what the terms of this debate are. A-theorists are often lumped with a miscellaneous collection of heterodox doctrines: the view that only the present exists, that time flows relentlessly, or that presentness is a property (Williams 1996); that time passes, tense is unanalysable, or that earlier than and later than are defined in terms of pastness, presentness, and futurity (Bigelow (...)
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  36. Charles Parsons (2010). Gödel and Philosophical Idealism. Philosophia Mathematica 18 (2):166-192.score: 30.0
    Kurt Gödel made many affirmations of robust realism but also showed serious engagement with the idealist tradition, especially with Leibniz, Kant, and Husserl. The root of this apparently paradoxical attitude is his conviction of the power of reason. The paper explores the question of how Gödel read Kant. His argument that relativity theory supports the idea of the ideality of time is discussed critically, in particular attempting to explain the assertion that science can go beyond the appearances and ‘approach the (...)
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  37. Josh Parsons, Intrinsic Value and Intrinsic Properties.score: 30.0
    It’s now commonplace — since Korsgaard (1996) — in ethical theory to distinguish between two distinctions: on the one hand, the distinction between value an object has in virtue of its intrinsic properties vs. the value it has in virtue of all its properties, intrinsic or extrinsic; and on the other hand, the distinction between the value has an object as an end, vs. the value it has as a means to something else. I’ll call the former distinction the distinction (...)
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  38. John R. Lucas (1961). Minds, Machines and Godel. Philosophy 36 (April-July):112-127.score: 30.0
    Goedel's theorem states that in any consistent system which is strong enough to produce simple arithmetic there are formulae which cannot be proved-in-the-system, but which we can see to be true. Essentially, we consider the formula which says, in effect, "This formula is unprovable-in-the-system". If this formula were provable-in-the-system, we should have a contradiction: for if it were provablein-the-system, then it would not be unprovable-in-the-system, so that "This formula is unprovable-in-the-system" would be false: equally, if it were provable-in-the-system, then it (...)
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  39. Josh Parsons (2005). Truthmakers, the Past, and the Future. In Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd (eds.), Truthmakers: The Contemporary Debate. Clarendon.score: 30.0
    I want to join Dummett in saying that the reality of the past (and, by analogy, the reality of the future) is an issue of realism versus anti-realism: (Dummett 1969) If you affirm the reality of the past, you are a realist about the past. If you deny the reality of the past, you are an anti-realist about the past. (And likewise, in each case, for the future). It makes sense to think of these issues by analogy with realism about (...)
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  40. Josh Parsons (1999). There is No 'Truthmaker' Argument Against Nominalism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (3):325 – 334.score: 30.0
    In his two recent books on ontology, Universals: an Opinionated Introduction, and A World of States of Affairs, David Armstrong gives a new argument against nominalism. That argument seems, on the face of it, to be similar to another argument that he used much earlier against Rylean behaviourism: the Truthmaker Argument, stemming from a certain plausible premise, the Truthmaker Principle. Other authors have traced the history of the truthmaker principle, its appearance in the work of Aristotle [10], Bradley [16], and (...)
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  41. John R. Lucas, The Implications of Godel's Theorem.score: 30.0
    In 1931 Kurt Gödel proved two theorems about the completeness and consistency of first-order arithmetic. Their implications for philosophy are profound. Many fashionable tenets are shown to be untenable: many traditional intuitions are vindicated by incontrovertible arguments.
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  42. Josh Parsons (2008). Hudson on Location. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (2):427 - 435.score: 30.0
    Paper begins: Chapter 4 of Hud Hudson’s stimulating book The metaphysics of hyperspace contains an discussion of the notion of location in a container spacetime. Hudson uses this idea to define a number of what we might call modes of extension or ways of being extended. A pertended object is what most people think of as a typical extended object — it is made up of spatial parts, one part for each region the object pervades. An entended object is an (...)
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  43. Charles Parsons (1974). The Liar Paradox. Journal of Philosophical Logic 3 (4):381 - 412.score: 30.0
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  44. Terence Parsons (1969). Essentialism and Quantified Modal Logic. Philosophical Review 78 (1):35-52.score: 30.0
  45. Josh Parsons, Review of Possible Worlds. [REVIEW]score: 30.0
    This book is a survey, fortified by original material, of metaphysical theories of modality set in terms of possible worlds. Those theories include what Divers calls “genuine realism”, or “GR” — this is David Lewis’s “genuine modal realism” — and what Divers calls “actualist realism”, or “AR” — this seems to be the same as what Lewis called “ersatz modal realism”, which has also become widely know as “ersatzism”. Two important kinds of theory are not included: those that treat modality (...)
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  46. Josh Parsons (2006). Negative Truths From Positive Facts? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (4):591 – 602.score: 30.0
    I argue that Colin Cheyne and Charles Pigden's recent attempt to find truthmakers for negative truths fails. Though Cheyne and Pigden are correct in their treatment of some of the truths they set out to find truthmakers for (such as 'There is no hippopotamus in S223' and 'Theatetus is not flying') they over-generalize when they apply the same treatment to 'There are no unicorns'. In my view, this difficulty is ineliminable: not every truth has a truthmaker.
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  47. Terence D. Parsons (1981). Frege's Hierarchies of Indirect Senses and the Paradox of Analysis. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 6 (1):37-58.score: 30.0
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  48. Josh Parsons (2003). Why the Handicapped Child Case is Hard. Philosophical Studies 112 (2):147 - 162.score: 30.0
    This paper discusses the handicapped child case and some other variants of Derek Parfit's non-identityproblem (Parfit, 1984) The case is widely held to show that there is harmless wrongdoing, and that amoral system which tries to reduce wrongdoing directly to harm (``person-affecting morality'')is inadequate.I show that the argument for this does not depend (as some have implied it does) on Kripkean necessity of origin. I distinguish the case from other variants (``wrongful life cases'') of the non-identityproblem which do not bear (...)
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  49. Josh Parsons (2013). Conceptual Conservatism and Contingent Composition. Inquiry 56 (4):327-339.score: 30.0
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  50. John R. Lucas, The Godelian Argument: Turn Over the Page.score: 30.0
    I have no quarrel with the first two sentences: but the third, though charitable and courteous, is quite untrue. Although there are criticisms which can be levelled against the Gödelian argument, most of the critics have not read either of my, or either of Penrose's, expositions carefully, and seek to refute arguments we never put forward, or else propose as a fatal objection one that had already been considered and countered in our expositions of the argument. Hence my title. The (...)
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