58 found
Order:
See also:
  1.  16
    Luce Irigaray (1993). An Ethics of Sexual Difference. Cornell University Press.
    This collection consists of lectures given at Erasmus University in Rotterdam. They were delivered under the provisions of the Jan Tin- bergen Chair, ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   113 citations  
  2.  18
    Luce Irigaray (1985). Speculum of the Other Woman. Cornell University Press.
    A radically subversive critique brings to the fore the masculine ideology implicit in psychoanalytic theory and in Western discourse in general: woman is defined as a disadvantaged man, a male construct with no status of her own.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   142 citations  
  3.  5
    Luce Irigaray (1985). This Sex Which Is Not One. Cornell University Press.
    In eleven acute and widely ranging essays, Irigaray reconsiders the question of female sexuality in a variety of contexts that are relevant to current discussion of feminist theory and practice.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   138 citations  
  4.  3
    Luce Irigaray (1993). Sexes and Geneologies. Columbia University Press.
    Sexes and Genealogies also includes Irigaray's dazzling reading of the Oresteia, "Body Against Body: In Relation to the Mother," now acknowleged as a feminist classic.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   48 citations  
  5. Luce Irigaray (2001). To Be Two. Routledge.
    First published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   21 citations  
  6.  40
    Luce Irigaray (1993). Je, Tu, Nous: Toward a Culture of Difference. New York ;Routledge.
    Irigaray offers the clearest available introduction to her own work. Focusing on power, women, gender and patriarchal mythologies, she lays out what for her has become the central problem for women in the modern world.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   31 citations  
  7. Luce Irigaray & Margaret Whitford (1991). The Irigaray Reader.
  8.  64
    Luce Irigaray (1996). I Love to You: Sketch for a Felicity Within History. Routledge.
    In I Love to You , Luce Irigaray moves from the critique of patriarchy to an exploration of the ground for a possible inter-subjectivity between the two sexes. Continuing her rejection of demands for equality, Irigaray poses the question: how can we move to a new era of sexual difference in which women and men establish lasting relations with one another without reducing the other to the status of object? Drawing upon Hegel, Irigaray proposes a dialectic appropriate to each sex (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   21 citations  
  9. Luce Irigaray (2013). Democracy Begins Between Two. Routledge.
    In _Democracy Begins Between Two,_ Luce Irigaray calls for a form of specific civil rights guaranteeing women a separate civil identity of their own equivalent to-though not simply the same as-that enjoyed by men.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  10.  5
    Luce Irigaray (1991). Marine Lover of Friedrich Nietzsche. Columbia University Press.
    Published in France in 1980, Marine Lover is the first in a trilogy in which Luce Irigaray links the interrogation of the feminine in post-Hegelian philosophy with a pre-Socratic investigation of the elements.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   25 citations  
  11. Luce Irigaray (1999). The Forgetting of Air in Martin Heidegger. University of Texas Press.
    French theorist Luce Irigaray has become one of the twentieth century's most influential feminist thinkers. Among her many writings are three books (with a projected fourth) in which she challenges the Western tradition's construals of human beings' relations to the four elements--earth, air, fire, and water--and to nature. In answer to Heidegger's undoing of Western metaphysics as a "forgetting of Being," Irigaray seeks in this work to begin to think out the Being of sexedness and the sexedness of Being. This (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  12. Luce Irigaray (1984). Ethique de la Différence Sexuelle. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  13.  4
    Luce Irigaray (2001). Democracy Begins Between Two. Routledge.
    In Democracy Begins Between Two, Luce Irigaray calls for a form of specific civil rights guaranteeing women a separate civil identity of their own equivalent to-though not simply the same as-that enjoyed by men.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  14. Luce Irigaray & Karin Montin (1994). Thinking the Difference for a Peaceful Revolution. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  15. Luce Irigaray (2013). Democracy Begins Between Two. Routledge.
    In _Democracy Begins Between Two,_ Luce Irigaray calls for a form of specific civil rights guaranteeing women a separate civil identity of their own equivalent to-though not simply the same as-that enjoyed by men.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16. Luce Irigaray (2002). To Speak is Never Neutral. Routledge.
    Feminist philosopher, linguist, and psychoanalyst Luce Irigaray is renowned for her analyses of language, studies that can be precise and poetic at the same time. In this volume of her work on language, linguistics, and psychoanalysis, she is concerned with developing a model that can reveal those unconscious or pre-conscious structures that determine speech. A key element of her method is the comparison of spoken and written language, through which she teases out the sexual and social configurations of speech.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  17.  1
    Luce Irigaray (2001). Between East and West: From Singularity to Community. Columbia University Press.
    A history of mystical Islamic poetry, not only in Arabic and Persian, but also in the popular folk traditions of regional vernacular languages, including a chapter on Rumi and Sufi poetry.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  18.  75
    Luce Irigaray (2004). To Paint the Invisible. Continental Philosophy Review 37 (4):389-405.
    In this essay, which is preceded by an interview with the translator, the author revisits her earlier critique of Merleau-Ponty’s privileging of the visible, but also takes further her own thinking by drawing specifically on the issues raised within the context of painting. The focal point of her discussion is Merleau-Ponty’s essay, “Eye and Mind.”.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  19. Luce Irigaray (1983). Ce Sexe Qui N'en Est Pas Un. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  20.  93
    Luce Irigaray & Carol Mastrangelo Bové (1987). Le Sujet de la Science Est-Ll Sexué?/Is the Subject of Science Sexed? Hypatia 2 (3):65 - 87.
    The premise of this paper is that the language of science, like language in general, is neither asexual nor neutral. The essay demonstrates the various ways in which the non-neutrality of the subject of science is expressed and proposes that there is a need to analyze the laws that determine the acceptability of language and discourse in order to interpret their connection to a sexed logic. C.B.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  48
    Luce Irigaray & Eleanor H. Kuykendall (1989). Sorcerer Love: A Reading of Plato's Symposium, Diotima's Speech. Hypatia 3 (3):32 - 44.
    "Sorcerer Love" is the name that Luce Irigaray gives to the demonic function of love as presented in Plato's Symposium. She argues that Socrates there attributes two incompatible positions to Diotima, who in any case is not present at the banquet. The first is that love is a mid-point or intermediary between lovers which also teaches immortality. The second is that love is a means to the end and duty of procreation, and thus is a mere means to immortality through (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  22. Jeffner Allen & Luce Irigaray (1988). Lesbian Philosophy: Explorations. Hypatia 3 (2):172-174.
  23.  10
    Luce Irigaray (2011). Perhaps Cultivating Touch Can Still Save Us. Substance 40 (3):130-140.
  24. Luce Irigaray & Mary Green (eds.) (2008). Luce Irigaray: Teaching. Continuum.
  25. Luce Irigaray (1983). L'oubli de l'Air Chez Martin Heidegger. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  26.  30
    Luce Irigaray (2003). A Future Horizon for Art? Continental Philosophy Review 36 (4):353-365.
  27. Luce Irigaray (1992). J'aime À Toi Esquisse d'Une Félicité Dans L'Histoire. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  34
    Luce Irigaray & Karen I. Burke (2007). Beyond Totem and Idol, the Sexuate Other. Continental Philosophy Review 40 (4):353-364.
    The author interprets idolatry, totemism, sacrilege and taboo through her theory of sexual difference and her study of Eastern spirituality. She argues that the taboo on spirituality in Western culture has cancelled difference, resulting in our current forms of idolatry. Preserving difference, however, would allow the transcendence of the human other to exist. The task of learning to respect difference is central to human spirituality and spiritual progression. The article is a translation of “La transcendance de l’autre” in Autour d’idôlatrie: (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Luce Irigaray (1996). Thinking Life as Relation: An Interview with Luce Irigaray. Man and World 29 (4):350-51.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30.  2
    Luce Irigaray (1987). Translated by Carol Mastrangelo Bové. Hypatia 2 (3):65-87.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31.  6
    Luce Irigaray (2005). A Reading of Levinas, Totality and Infinity, Section IV, B," The Phenomenology of Eros. In Claire Elise Katz & Lara Trout (eds.), Emmanuel Levinas. Routledge 1--227.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  6
    Luce Irigaray & Katharina Karcher, 'Exchanges' - Conversations With... Luce Irigaray.
    Renowned neurologist and author Dr Oliver Sacks is a visiting professor at the University of Warwick as part of the Institute of Advanced Study. Dr Sacks was born in London. He earned his medical degree at the University of Oxford (Queen’s College) and the Middlesex Hospital (now UCL), followed by residencies and fellowships at Mt. Zion Hospital in San Francisco and at University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). As well as authoring best-selling books such as Awakenings and The Man Who (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  4
    Luce Irigaray & M. Dobie (1991). Ecce Mulier?(Fragments). Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 15 (2):144-158.
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  1
    Luce Irigaray (2013). Breathing as a Condition for Natural and Spiritual Life. In Lenart Škof (ed.), Breathing with Luce Irigaray. Bloomsbury 217.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  3
    Luce Irigaray (1978). Le langage « de » l'homme. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 168 (4):495 - 504.
  36.  2
    Luce Irigaray (2006). Acción, sentido y verdad. Estudios de Filosofía Analítica. Logos: Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica 39:3.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Simone de Beauvoir, Michele Le Doeuff, Christine Delphy, Colette Guillaumin, Monique Wittig, Julia Kristeva, Luce Irigaray & Helene Cixous (2000). French Feminism Reader. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    French Feminism Reader is a collection of essays representing the authors and issues from French theory most influential in the American context. The book is designed for use in courses, and it includes illuminating introductions to the work of each author. These introductions include biographical information, influences and intellectual context, major themes in the author's work as a whole, and specific introductions to the selections in this volume. This collection includes selections by Simone de Beauvoir, Christine Delphy, Colette Guilluamin, Monique (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Sexual Difference Interval, Luce Irigaray & Henri Bergson (2008). Rebecca hill. Hypatia 23 (1-2):119.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Luce Irigaray (1994). Amo a Ti Bosquejo de Una Felicidad En la Historia. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Luce Irigaray (2010). Antigone: Between Myth and History/Antigone's Legacy. In S. E. Wilmer & Audrone Zukauskaite (eds.), Interrogating Antigone in Postmodern Philosophy and Criticism. OUP Oxford
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Luce Irigaray (2001). Democracy Begins Between Two. Routledge.
    In _Democracy Begins Between Two,_ Luce Irigaray calls for a form of specific civil rights guaranteeing women a separate civil identity of their own equivalent to-though not simply the same as-that enjoyed by men.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Luce Irigaray (2013). Democracy Begins Between Two. Routledge.
    In _Democracy Begins Between Two,_ Luce Irigaray calls for a form of specific civil rights guaranteeing women a separate civil identity of their own equivalent to-though not simply the same as-that enjoyed by men.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Luce Irigaray (2013). Democracy Begins Between Two. Routledge.
    In _Democracy Begins Between Two,_ Luce Irigaray calls for a form of specific civil rights guaranteeing women a separate civil identity of their own equivalent to-though not simply the same as-that enjoyed by men.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Luce Irigaray & Kirsteen Anderson (2000). Democracy Begins with Two. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Luce Irigaray (1990). En mémoire de lui ? Cahiers Internationaux de Symbolisme.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Luce Irigaray (1999). Entre Orient Et Occident de la Singularité À la Communauté. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Luce Irigaray, Agnès Vincenot & Désirée Verberk (1993). Ik, jij, wij. Voor een cultuur van het onderscheid. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 55 (3):579-579.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Luce Irigaray (2007). Je, Tu, Nous: Toward a Culture of Difference: With a Personal Note by the Author. Routledge.
    A personal note : equal or different? -- The neglect of female genealogies -- Religious and civil myths -- Women's discourse and men's discourse -- On the maternal order -- The culture of difference -- Writing as a woman -- "I won't get AIDS" -- Linguistic sexes and genders -- The right to life -- Why define sexed rights? -- "More women than men" -- Your health : what, or who, is it? -- How can we create our beauty? -- (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Luce Irigaray (2015). Je, Tu, Nous: Towards a Culture of Difference. Routledge.
    A passionate celebrator of "sexual difference," Luce Irigaray was never simply after the social equality that her generation so publicly demanded. She was seeking more fundamentally a society that celebrated the differences between the genders and their coming together in a union without hierarchy. As she formulates it in this compellingly readable introduction to her own thought, Irigaray is writing about how "I" and "You" become "We." Exploring along the way women’s experiences of motherhood, abortion, the AIDS crisis and the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Luce Irigaray (2007). Je, Tu, Nous: Towards a Culture of Difference. Routledge.
    A passionate celebrator of "sexual difference," Luce Irigaray was never simply after the social equality that her generation so publicly demanded. She was seeking more fundamentally a society that celebrated the differences between the genders and their coming together in a union without hierarchy. As she formulates it in this compellingly readable introduction to her own thought, Irigaray is writing about how "I" and "You" become "We." Exploring along the way women’s experiences of motherhood, abortion, the AIDS crisis and the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 58