Search results for 'Lucretius' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Monte Ransome Johnson & Catherine Wilson (2007). Lucretius and the History of Science. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    An overview of the influence of Lucretius poem On the Nature of Things (De Rerum Natura) on the renaissance and scientific revolution of the seventeenth century, and an examination of its continuing influence over physical atomism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
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  2. Monte Ransome Johnson (2013). Nature, Spontaneity, and Voluntary Action in Lucretius. In Daryn Lehoux, A. D. Morrison & Alison Sharrock (eds.), Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    In twenty important passages located throughout De rerum natura, Lucretius refers to natural things happening spontaneously (sponte sua; the Greek term is automaton). The most important of these uses include his discussion of the causes of: nature, matter, and the cosmos in general; the generation and adaptation of plants and animals; the formation of images and thoughts; and the behavior of human beings and the development of human culture. In this paper I examine the way spontaneity functions as a (...)
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  3. Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.) (2007). The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.score: 15.0
    Lucretius' didactic poem De rerum natura ('On the Nature of Things') is an impassioned and visionary presentation of the materialist philosophy of Epicurus, and one of the most powerful poetic texts of antiquity. After its rediscovery in 1417 it became a controversial and seminal work in successive phases of literary history, the history of science, and the Enlightenment. In this Cambridge Companion experts in the history of literature, philosophy and science discuss the poem in its ancient contexts and in (...)
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  4. Nicolas Bommarito (2011). Lucretius' Symmetry Argument. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 15.0
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  5. James Warren (2001). Lucretius, Symmetry Arguments, and Fearing Death. Phronesis 46 (4):466-491.score: 12.0
    This paper identifies two possible versions of the Epicurean 'Symmetry argument', both of which claim that post mortem non-existence is relevantly like prenatal non-existence and that therefore our attitude to the former should be the same as that towards the latter. One version addresses the fear of the state of being dead by making it equivalent to the state of not yet being born; the other addresses the prospective fear of dying by relating it to our present retrospective attitude to (...)
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  6. John Douglas Minyard (1985). Lucretius and the Late Republic: An Essay in Roman Intellectual History. E.J. Brill.score: 12.0
    LUCRETIUS AND THE LATE REPUBLIC . Roman Intellectual History The history of human values is the history of changing notions about truth and reality, ...
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  7. Tim O'Keefe (2005). Lucretius. In Patricia O'Grady (ed.), Meet the Philosophers of Ancient Greece,.score: 12.0
    <span class='Hi'>Titus</span> Lucretius Carus was an ardent disciple of Epicurus and the author of the De Rerum Natura (On the Nature of Things), one of the greatest poems in Latin. Other than his approximate dates of birth and death, we have next to no reliable information about him. (St. Jerome's report, in the 4th Century AD, that Lucretius was driven insane by a love potion and composed the De Rerum Natura in the lucid intervals between bouts of madness (...)
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  8. Jeremy R. Simon (2010). Playing the Odds: A New Response to Lucretius's Symmetry Argument. European Journal of Philosophy 18 (3):414-424.score: 12.0
    Abstract: Most commentators have assumed that Lucretius's symmetry argument against the fear of death is flawed. There remains, however, dispute as to what the flaw is. After establishing what I understand the target of Lucretius's argument to be (a desire for a longer life as such), I argue for a novel interpretation of what the flaw is, namely, that extending one's life into the time before one was actually born would be an uncertain bet for one who wanted (...)
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  9. Gordon Lindsay Campbell (2003). Lucretius on Creation and Evolution: A Commentary on De Rerum Natura, Book Five, Lines 772-1104. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    Lucretius' account of the origin of life, the origin of species, and human prehistory (first century BC) is the longest and most detailed account extant from the ancient world. It is a mechanistic theory that does away with the need for any divine design, and has been seen as a forerunner of Darwin's theory of evolution. This commentary seeks to locate Lucretius in both the ancient and modern contexts. The recent revival of creationism makes this study particularly relevant (...)
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  10. Mark Holowchak (2004). Lucretius on the Gates of Horn and Ivory: A Psychophysical Challenge to Prophecy by Dreams. Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (4):355-368.score: 12.0
    : Lucretius' Epicurean account of dreams in Book IV of De Rerum Natura indicates that they are wholly void of prophetic significance and of little practical significance. Dreams, rightly apprehended, do little more than mirror our daily preoccupations. For Lucretius, all dreams pass through the gate of ivory and all are reducible to psychophysical phenomena.In this paper, I examine Lucretius' account of sleep and the formation of dreams in light of the Epicurean aims of the poem as (...)
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  11. Alison Brown (2010). The Return of Lucretius to Renaissance Florence. Harvard University Press.score: 12.0
    The early Epicurean revival in Florence and Italy -- Medicean Florence : Ficino and Bartolomeo Scala -- Republican Florence : the university lectures of Marcello Adriani -- Niccol Machiavelli and the influence of Lucretius -- Lucretian networks in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries -- Appendix : notes on Machiavelli's transcription of MS Vat. Rossi 884.
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  12. Monica Gale (1994). Myth and Poetry in Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
    The employment of mythological language and imagery by an Epicurean poet - an adherent of a system not only materialist, but overtly hostile to myth and poetry - is highly paradoxical. This apparent contradiction has often been ascribed to a conflict in the poet between reason and intellect, or to a desire to enliven his philosophical material with mythological digressions. This book attempts to provide a more positive assessment of Lucretius' aims and methodology by considering the poet's attitude to (...)
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  13. Tim O'Keefe (2003). Lucretius on the Cycle of Life and the Fear of Death. Apeiron 36 (1):43 - 65.score: 12.0
    In De Rerum Natura III 963-971, Lucretius argues that death should not be feared because it is a necessary part of the natural cycle of life and death. This argument has received little philosophical attention, except by Martha Nussbaum, who asserts it is quite strong. However, Nussbaum's view is unsustainable, and I offer my own reading. I agree with Nussbaum that, as she construes it, the cycle of life argument is quite distinct from the better-known Epicurean arguments: not only (...)
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  14. Warren Montag (2012). Lucretius Hebraizant: Spinoza's Reading of Ecclesiastes. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (1):109-129.score: 12.0
    Spinoza viewed the book of Ecclesiastes, in its original Hebrew and thus cleared of the interpretations imposed upon it in the guise of translation, as a powerful critique of the two most important variants of the superstition that taught human beings to regard both nature and themselves as degraded expressions of an unattainable perfection. The first was organized around the concept of miracle, the divine suspension of the actual concatenation of things, as if God were an earthly sovereign declaring a (...)
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  15. Paul Rahe (2007). In the Shadow of Lucretius: The Epicurean Foundations of Machiavelli's Political Thought. History of Political Thought 28 (1):30-55.score: 12.0
    Although repeated attempts have been made over the last half-century to make sense of Machiavelli's Discourses on Livy as an exposition of classical republicanism, such endeavours are bound to fail. After all, Machiavelli rejected the teleology underpinning the discursive republicanism of the ancients, and his understanding of the ends pursued by republics was profoundly at odds with the understanding predominant in ancient Greece and Rome. If he had a classical mentor, it cannot, then, have been Aristotle or Cicero or one (...)
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  16. Elizabeth Asmis (2007). Lucretius Venus and Stoic Zeus. In Monica Gale (ed.), Lucretius. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
  17. Eric Baker (2007). Lucretius in the European Enlightenment. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  18. Reid Barbour (2007). Moral and Political Philosophy : Reading of Lucretius From Virgil to Voltaire. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press. 149--66.score: 12.0
  19. Reid Barbour & David Norbrook (eds.) (2011). The Works of Lucy Hutchinson: Volume I: The Translation of Lucretius. OUP Oxford.score: 12.0
    This is the first volume in the four-volume edition of The Works of Lucy Hutchinson, the first-ever collected edition of the writings of the pioneering author and translator. Hutchinson (1620-81) had a remarkable range of her interests, from Latin poetry to Civil War politics and theology. This edition of her translation of Lucretius's De rerum natura offers new biographical material, demonstrating the changes and unexpected continuities in Hutchinson's life between the work's composition in the 1650s and its dedication in (...)
     
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  20. Robert D. Brown (2007). Lucretius and Callimachus. In Monica Gale (ed.), Lucretius. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  21. Diskin Clay (2007). The Sources of Lucretius Inspiration. In Monica Gale (ed.), Lucretius. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  22. H. S. Commager Jr (2007). Lucretius' Interpretation of the Plague. In Monica Gale (ed.), Lucretius. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  23. Phillip De Lacy (2007). Distant Views : The Imagery of Lucretius. In Monica Gale (ed.), Lucretius. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  24. Philip Ford (2007). Lucretius in Early Modern France. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press. 227--41.score: 12.0
     
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  25. P. Friedlnder (2007). Pattern of Sound and Atomistic Theory in Lucretius. In Monica Gale (ed.), Lucretius. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  26. David J. Furley (2007). Lucretius the Epicurean : On the History of Man. In Monica Gale (ed.), Lucretius. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  27. Monica Gale (2007). Lucretius and Previous Poetic Traditions. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press. 59--75.score: 12.0
     
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  28. Stuart Gillespie & Donald Mackenzie (2007). Lucretius and the Moderns. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  29. Stuart Gillespie (2007). Lucretius in the English Renaissance. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  30. R. J. Hankinson (2013). Lucretius, Epicurus, and the Logic of Multiple Explanations. In Daryn Lehoux, A. D. Morrison & Alison Sharrock (eds.), Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
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  31. R. I. Hankinson (2013). Lucretius, Epicurus, and the Logic of Multiple Explanations. In Daryn Lehoux, A. D. Morrison & Alison Sharrock (eds.), Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science. Oxford University Press. 69.score: 12.0
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  32. Philip Hardie (2007). Lucretius and Later Latin Literature in Antiquity. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
  33. Yasmin Haskell (2008). Latin Poet‐Doctors of the Eighteenth Century: The German Lucretius (Johann Ernst Hebenstreit) Versus the Dutch Ovid (Gerard Nicolaas Heerkens). Intellectual History Review 18 (1):91-101.score: 12.0
    (2008). Latin Poet‐Doctors of the Eighteenth Century: the German Lucretius (Johann Ernst Hebenstreit) Versus the Dutch Ovid (Gerard Nicolaas Heerkens) Intellectual History Review: Vol. 18, Humanism and Medicine in the Early Modern Era, pp. 91-101.
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  34. Yasmin Haskell (2007). Religion and Enlightenment in the Neo-Latin Reception of Lucretius. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press. 198.score: 12.0
  35. David Hopkins (2007). The English Voices of Lucretius From Lucy Hutchinson to John Mason Good. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press. 254.score: 12.0
     
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  36. Monte Johnson & Catherine Wilson (2007). Pt. 2. Themes. Lucretius and the History of Science. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  37. E. J. Kenney (2007). Doctus Lucretius. In Monica Gale (ed.), Lucretius. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  38. Duncan Kennedy (2007). Making a Text of the Universe : Perspectives on Discursive Order in the De Rerum Natura of Lucretius. In Monica Gale (ed.), Lucretius. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  39. David Konstan (2013). Lucretius and the Epicurean Attitude Toward Grief. In Daryn Lehoux, A. D. Morrison & Alison Sharrock (eds.), Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  40. Gerhard Mller (2007). The Conclusions of the Six Books of Lucretius. In Monica Gale (ed.), Lucretius. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  41. Dirk Obbink (2007). Lucretius and the Herculaneum Library. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  42. James I. Porter (2007). Lucretius and the Sublime. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press. 167--84.score: 12.0
     
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  43. Martin Priestman (2007). Lucretius in Romantic and Victorian Britain. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
  44. Valentina Prosperi (2007). Lucretius in the Italian Renaissance. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press. 214.score: 12.0
  45. Michael Reeve (2007). Lucretius in the Middle Ages and Early Renaissance: Transmission and Scholarship. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press. 205.score: 12.0
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  46. Michael Reeve (2007). Pt. 3. Reception. Lucretius in the Middle Ages and Early Renaissance : Transmission and Scholarship. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
  47. Alessandro Schiesaro (2007). Lucretius and Roman Politics and History. In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press. 41--58.score: 12.0
     
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  48. P. H. Schrijvers (2007). Seeing the Invisible : A Study of Lucretius' Use of Analogy in De Rerum Natura. In Monica Gale (ed.), Lucretius. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
     
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  49. D. N. Sedley (1998). Lucretius and the Transformation of Greek Wisdom. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
    This book is designed to appeal both to those interested in Roman poetry and to specialists in ancient philosophy. In it David Sedley explores Lucretius' complex relationship with Greek culture, in particular with Empedocles, whose poetry was the model for his own, with Epicurus, the source of his philosophical inspiration, and with the Greek language itself. He includes a detailed reconstruction of Epicurus' great treatise On Nature, and seeks to show how Lucretius worked with this as his sole (...)
     
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  50. Cari de Rerum Natura Libri Sex (2007). Adkins, AWH (1977)'Lucretius 1.16–139 and the Problems of Writing Versus Latini', Phoenix 31: 145–58. Adler, E.(2003) Vergil's Empire. Political Thought in the Aeneid. Lanham, Md. And Oxford. Aicher, PJ (1992)'Lucretian Revisions of Homer', Classical Journal 87: 139–58. [REVIEW] In Stuart Gillespie & Philip R. Hardie (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Lucretius. Cambridge University Press. 327.score: 12.0
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