Search results for 'Lucy Bradley-Springer' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  3
    Brendan P. Bradley, Karin Mogg, Sara J. Falla & Lucy R. Hamilton (1998). Attentional Bias for Threatening Facial Expressions in Anxiety: Manipulation of Stimulus Duration. Cognition and Emotion 12 (6):737-753.
  2. James Bradley & Leslie Armour (1996). Philosophy After F.H. Bradley a Collection of Essays. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  3. F. H. Bradley (1999). Collected Works of F.H. Bradley. Thoemmes Press.
    F. H. Bradley (1846-1924) was considered in his day to be the greatest British philosopher since Hume. For modern philosophers he continues to be an important and influential figure. However, the opposition to metaphysical thinking throughout most of the twentieth century has somewhat eclipsed his important place in the history of British thought. Consequently, although there is renewed interest in his ideas and role in the development of Western philosophy, his writings are often hard to find. This collection unites all (...)
     
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  4.  18
    F. H. Bradley (1995). FH Bradley Bibliography. Modern Schoolman 73 (2):91-114.
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  5.  53
    F. H. Bradley (1895). "Rational Hedonism."-Note by Mr. Bradley. International Journal of Ethics 5 (3):383-384.
  6.  15
    James Bradley (1912). The Rev. James Bradley on the Motion of the Fixed Stars. The Monist 22 (2):268-285.
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  7. E. Clinton- Andrews & Richard Bradley (1903). Richard Bradley.
     
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  8. F. H. Bradley (1895). "Rational Hedonism."-Note by Mr. Bradley. Ethics 5 (3):383.
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  9. F. H. Bradley (1895). "Rational Hedonism."-Note by Mr. Bradley. International Journal of Ethics 5 (3):383-384.
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  10. J. Bradley (1992). Relations, Intelligibility and Non-Contradiction in Bradley, Fh Metaphysics of Feeling-a Reinterpretation. 2. Archives de Philosophie 55 (1):77-91.
     
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  11. J. Bradley (1992). Relations, intelligibilité et non-contradiction dans la métaphysique du sentir de FH Bradley: une réinterprétation (II). Archives de Philosophie 55 (1):77-91.
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  12. James Bradley (1991). Richard Rorty and James Bradley. Heythrop Journal 32 (2):249-253.
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  13. F. H. Bradley & Lionel Rubinoff (1968). The Presuppositions of Critical History [by] F.H. Bradley. Edited with Introd. And Commentary by Lionel Rubinoff. J.M. Dent.
     
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  14.  5
    Lucy Bradley-Springer (1995). Being in Pain: A Nurse's Experience. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 26 (2):58-70.
    This paper uses Schrag's framework to analyze an episode of pain and to discuss the phenomenological perspective of pain. The experience of pain is explicated through the metaphor of co-present, interwoven fields of consciousness, embodiment, attitudinal posture and custom, time, and space. Interventions based on the metaphor are discussed.
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  15.  9
    F. Sauri (1998). Bradley's Supposed Rejection of Subject-Predicate Judgements. Bradley Studies 4 (1):102-112.
    Textual evidence normally quoted to justify the claim that F. H. Bradley rejects subject - predicate judgements has other functions: namely to reject concrete interpretations of subject - predicate judgements. Bradley has his own view of subject - predicate judgement: in a judgement subject and predicate forma an adjetive which is predicated of the whole reality.
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  16. Anna-Sofia Maurin (2010). Trope Theory and the Bradley Regress. Synthese 175 (3):311-326.
    Trope theory is the view that the world is a world of abstract particular qualities. But if all there is are tropes, how do we account for the truth of propositions ostensibly made true by some concrete particular? A common answer is that concrete particulars are nothing but tropes in compresence. This answer seems vulnerable to an argument (first presented by F. H. Bradley) according to which any attempt to account for the nature of relations will end up either in (...)
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  17.  43
    Guido Bonino (2013). Bradley's Regress: Relations, Exemplification, Unity. Axiomathes 23 (2):189-200.
    Different interpretations of Bradley’s regress argument are considered. On the basis of textual evidences, it is argued that the most persuasive is the one that sees the argument as primarily addressing the general issue of unity or connectedness.
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  18.  50
    Katarina Perovic (2014). The Import of the Original Bradley's Regress(Es). Axiomathes 24 (3):375-394.
    Much of the recent metaphysical literature on the problem of the relational unity of complexes leaves the impression that Bradley (or some Bradleyan argument) has uncovered a serious problem to be addressed. The problem is thought to be particularly challenging for trope theorists and realists about universals. In truth, there has been little clarity about the nature and import of the original Bradley’s regress arguments. In this paper, I offer a careful analysis and reconstruction of the arguments in Bradley’s Appearance (...)
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  19.  31
    Mathias Girel (2006). Relations internes et relations spatiales : James, Bradley et Green. Archives de Philosophie 3:395-414.
    La thèse du présent article est que l’opposition factice entre James, repré- sentant supposé des « relations externes », d’une part, et Bradley, représen- tant supposé des « relations internes », d’autre part, est due à une mauvaise appréhension des thèses de ce dernier. Ce premier contresens conduit alors à manquer le propos même de James.
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  20.  30
    Douglas W. Portmore (2010). Ben Bradley, Well-Being and Death (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2009), Pp. Xxi + 198. Utilitas 22 (4):500-503.
    Review of Ben Bradley's Well-Being and Death.
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  21.  35
    Igor Douven (2007). On Bradley's Preservation Condition for Conditionals. Erkenntnis 67 (1):111 - 118.
    Bradley has argued that a truth-conditional semantics for conditionals is incompatible with an allegedly very weak and intuitively compelling constraint on the interpretation of conditionals. I argue that the example Bradley offers to motivate this constraint can be explained along pragmatic lines that are compatible with the correctness of at least one popular truth-conditional semantics for conditionals.
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  22.  48
    Holger Leerhoff (2008). Bradley's Regress, Russell's States of Affairs, and Some General Remarks on the Problem. Studia Philosophica Estonica 1 (2):249-264.
    In this paper, I will give a presentation of Bradley's two main arguments against the reality of relations. Whereas one of his arguments is highly specific to Bradley's metaphysical background, his famous regress argument seems to pose a serious threat not only for ontological pluralism, but especially for states of affairs as an ontological category. Amongst the proponents of states-of-affairs ontologies two groups can be distinguished: One group holds states of affairs to be complexes consisting of their particular and universal (...)
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  23.  53
    T. Allan Hillman (2008). The Early Russell on the Metaphysics of Substance in Leibniz and Bradley. Synthese 163 (2):245 - 261.
    While considerable ink has been spilt over the rejection of idealism by Bertrand Russell and G.E. Moore at the end of the 19th Century, relatively little attention has been directed at Russell’s A Critical Exposition of the Philosophy of Leibniz, a work written in the early stages of Russell’s philosophical struggles with the metaphysics of Bradley, Bosanquet, and others. Though a sustained investigation of that work would be one of considerable scope, here I reconstruct and develop a two-pronged argument from (...)
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  24.  3
    Michael Partridge & Leemon B. McHenry (1993). Whitehead and Bradley: A Comparative Analysis. Philosophical Quarterly 43 (173):545.
    In his magnum opus, Process and Reality, Alfred North Whitehead claims a special affinity to Oxford philosopher Francis Herbert Bradley. McHenry clarifies exactly how much of Whitehead's metaphysics is influenced by and accords with the main principles of Bradley's "absolute idealism." He argues that many of Whitehead's doctrines cannot be understood without an adequate understanding of Bradley, in terms of both affinities and contrasts. He evaluates the arguments between them and explores several important connections with William James, Josiah Royce, George (...)
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  25.  4
    K. Brad Wray & Luciano Boschiero (2015). Metascience and Neurath’s Boat. Metascience 24 (2):171-172.
    Otto Neurath compared science to a ship at sea on which the sailors have to repair their vessel as they keep it afloat. Metascience is a ship of a similar sort. Do not worry. There are no repairs to report. But changes are being made at Metascience on an ongoing basis, even as we work to meet our production deadlines. With this, our second issue, we would like to announce some further changes with the journal.Ties Nijseen and Christi Lue who (...)
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  26.  33
    T. S. Eliot (1964). Knowledge and Experience in the Philosophy of F.H. Bradley. Columbia University Press.
    T. S. Eliot left Harvard during his third year of study in the department of philosophy and went to England. Forty-six years later he authorized the publication of his doctoral dissertation. Here we have a reprint of his sympathetic but not entirely uncritical study of the English idealist philosopher F. H. Bradley.
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  27. Bernard Bosanquet (1885). Knowledge and Reality a Criticism of Mr. F.H. Bradley's "Principles of Logic". Kegan Paul, Trench.
    After more than a decade teaching ancient Greek history and philosophy at University College, Oxford, British philosopher and political theorist Bernard Bosanquet resigned from his post to spend more time writing. He was particularly interested in contemporary social theory, and was involved with the Charity Organisation Society and the London Ethical Society. He wrote numerous articles before beginning this book, which was his first and was published in 1885 as a response to the Principles of Logic, published in 1883, by (...)
     
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  28. Timothy L. S. Sprigge (1993). James and Bradley American Truth and British Reality.
     
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  29. Rolf-Peter Horstmann (1984). Ontologie Und Relationen Hegel, Bradley, Russell Und Die Kontroverse Über Interne Und Externe Beziehungen. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  30.  6
    F. C. S. Schiller (1908). Is Mr. Bradley Becoming a Pragmatist? Mind 17 (67):370-383.
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  31.  20
    K. H. Sievers (1996). F.H. Bradley and the Coherence Theory of Truth. Bradley Studies 2 (2):82-103.
    The aim of this dissertation is to present a systematic account of F. H. Bradley's philosophy in so far as it is relevant to an understanding of his conception of the nature and criterion of truth. I argue that, for Bradley, the nature of truth is the identity of thought with reality given in immediate experience. There is no absolute separation between thought and its object. Bradley therefore rejects both the correspondence theory and epistemological realism. Thought is not just a (...)
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  32.  1
    Alex Gurnham (2011). Review of Adam Bradley, Book of Rhymes. [REVIEW] Mediatropes 3 (1):151-153.
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  33. Rudolf Kagey (1931). The Growth of F. H. Bradley's Logic. [N.P.].
     
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  34. Robert D. Mack (1968). The Appeal to Immediate Experience Philosophic Method in Bradley, Whitehead, and Dewey. Books for Libraries Press.
     
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  35. W. J. Mander (1996). Perspectives on the Logic and Metaphysics of F. H. Bradley. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  36. Hastings Rashdall (1912). The Metaphysic of Mr. F.H. Bradley [a Paper].
     
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  37. Francesco Orilia (2006). Stati di cose, esemplificazione e regresso di Bradley. Rivista di Filosofia 97 (3):349-386.
    This paper examines the challenge that the argument known as "Bradley's regress" poses to the friends of states of affairs (facts), in its requesting an explanation of the existence of a fact as a unitary whole in addition to its constituents. All the main theoretical options, short of denying that there are facts, are considered. It is argued that only two of them are viable, namely a "Brute fact approach", according to which the existence of a fact cannot be explained (...)
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  38.  26
    Jani Hakkarainen & Markku Keinänen (2016). Bradley's Reductio of Relations and Formal Ontological Relations. In Hemmo Laiho & Arto Repo (eds.), DE NATURA RERUM - Scripta in honorem professoris Olli Koistinen sexagesimum annum complentis. University of Turku 246-261.
    In this paper, we argue that formal ontological relations avoid Bradley's reductio of relations, including his famous relation regress.
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  39. Francesco Orilia (2009). Bradley's Regress and Ungrounded Dependence Chains: A Reply to Cameron. Dialectica 63 (3):333-341.
    A version of Bradley's regress can be endorsed in an effort to address the problem of the unity of states of affairs or facts, thereby arriving at a doctrine that I have called fact infinitism . A consequence of it is the denial of the thesis, WF, that all chains of ontological dependence are well-founded or grounded. Cameron has recently rejected fact infinitism by arguing that WF, albeit not necessarily true, is however contingently true. Here fact infinitism is supported by (...)
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  40. Anna-Sofia Maurin (2012). Bradley’s Regress. Philosophy Compass 7 (11):794-807.
    Ever since F. H. Bradley first formulated his famous regress argument philosophers have been hard at work trying to refute it. The argument fails, it has been suggested, either because its conclusion just does not follow from its premises, or it fails because one or more of its premises should be given up. In this paper, the Bradleyan argument, as well as some of the many and varied reactions it has received, is scrutinized.
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  41.  11
    Lucy Allais (2016). Book Symposium on Lucy Allais' Manifest Reality: Kant's Idealism and His Realism An Overview. European Journal of Philosophy 24 (1):235-240.
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  42. Stewart Candlish (2007). The Russell/Bradley Dispute and its Significance for Twentieth-Century Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In the early twentieth century an apparently obscure philosophical debate took place between F. H. Bradley and Bertrand Russell. The historical outcome was momentous: the demise of the movement known as British Idealism, and its eventual replacement by the various forms of analytic philosophy. Since then, a conception of this debate and its rights and wrongs has become entrenched in English-language philosophy. Stewart Candlish examines afresh the events of this formative period in twentieth-century thought and comes to some surprising conclusions.
     
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  43.  4
    Sebastián Briceño (2016). El regreso de Bradley y el problema de la unidad-compleja: ¿tropos al rescate? Critica 48 (143):47-75.
    It is commonly held that Bradley’s regress has a solution within a trope ontology. This seems to happen when a bundle is understood as constituted by non-transferable tropes. It also seems to happen when a bundle is understood as constituted by transferable tropes related by a relational trope of compresence whose existence specifically depends on those relata. In this article I demonstrate that these proposals fail in addressing the essential question that underlies the regress, incurring in a question-begging response already (...)
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  44. Richard Gaskin (1995). Bradley's Regress, the Copula and the Unity of the Proposition. Philosophical Quarterly 45 (179):161-180.
    If we make the basic assumption that the components of a proposition have reference on the model of proper name and bearer, we face the problem of distinguishing the proposition from a mere list' of names. We neutralize the problem posed by that assumption of we first of all follow Wiggins and distinguish, in every predicate, a strictly predicative element (the copula), and a strictly non-predicative conceptual component (available to be quantified over). If we further allow the copula itself to (...)
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  45.  90
    William F. Vallicella (2002). Relations, Monism, and the Vindication of Bradley's Regress. Dialectica 56 (1):3–35.
    This article articulates and defends F. H. Bradley's regress argument against external relations using contemporary analytic techniques and conceptuality. Bradley's argument is usually quickly dismissed as if it were beneath serious consideration. But I shall maintain that Bradley's argument, suitably reconstructed, is a powerful argument, plausibly premised, and free of such obvious fallacies as petitio principii. Thus it does not rest on the question‐begging assumption that all relations are internal, as Russell, and more recently van Inwagen, maintain. Bradley does not (...)
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  46.  21
    Massimo Mugnai (2010). Leibniz and 'Bradley's Regress'. Leibniz Review 20:1-12.
    In a text written during his stay in Paris, Leibniz, to deny ontological reality to relations, employs an argument well known to the medieval thinkers and which later would be revived by Francis H. Bradley. If one assumes that relations are real and that a relation links any property to a subject – so runs the argument – then one falls prey to an infinite regress. Leibniz seems to be well aware of the consequences that this argument has for his (...)
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  47.  2
    Harry van der Linden, Review: Killing by Remote Control: The Ethics of an Unmanned Military, Edited by Bradley Jay Strawser. [REVIEW]
    Dr. Harry van der Linden's review of: Killing by Remote Control: The Ethics of an Unmanned Military, edited by Bradley Jay Strawser. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.
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  48.  27
    W. J. Mander (1994). An Introduction to Bradley's Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.
    W. J. Mander provides a brief introduction to and critical assessment of the thought of the greatest of the British Idealist philosophers, F. H. Bradley (1846-1924), whose work has been largely neglected in this century. After a general introduction to Bradley's metaphysics and its logical foundations, Mander shows that much of Bradley's philosophy has been seriously misunderstood. Mander argues that any adequate treatment of Bradley's thought must take full account of his unique dual inheritance from the traditions of British empiricism (...)
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  49.  12
    Francesco Orilia (2006). States of Affairs: Bradley Vs. Meinong. In Venanzio Raspa (ed.), Meinongian Issues in Contemporary Italian Philosophy. Ontos 213--238.
    In line with much current literature, Bradley’s regress is here discussed as an argument that casts doubt on the existence of states of affairs or facts, understood as complex entities working as truthmakers for true sentences or propositions. One should distinguish two versions of Bradley’s regress, which stem from two different tentative explanations of the unity of states of affairs. The first version actually shows that the corresponding explanation is incoherent; the second one merely points to some prima facie implausible (...)
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  50.  26
    James W. Allard (2004). The Logical Foundations of Bradley's Metaphysics: Judgment, Inference, and Truth. Cambridge University Press.
    This major contribution to the study of F.H. Bradley, the most influential member of the nineteenth century school of British Idealist philosophers, offers a sustained interpretation of his Principles of Logic. After explaining how it is possible for inferences to be valid and yet have conclusions containing new information, James Allard describes how this solution provides a basis for Bradley's metaphysical view that reality is one interconnected experience. In the process he uncovers a new problem as to the nature of (...)
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