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Profile: Luke Russell (Catholic University of America)
  1. Luke Russell (2012). Evil and Incomprehensibility. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):62-73.
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  2. Luke Russell (2011). Tryhards, Fashion Victims, and Effortless Cool. In Jessica Wolfendale & Jeanette Kennett (eds.), Fashion – Philosophy for Everyone: Thinking with Style. Blackwell. 37--49.
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  3. Luke Russell (2010). Dispositional Accounts of Evil Personhood. Philosophical Studies 149 (2):231 - 250.
    It is intuitively plausible that not every evildoer is an evil person. In order to make sense of this intuition we need to construct an account of evil personhood in addition to an account of evil action. Some philosophers have offered aggregative accounts of evil personhood, but these do not fit well with common intuitions about the explanatory power of evil personhood, the possibility of moral reform, and the relationship between evil and luck. In contrast, a dispositional account of evil (...)
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  4. Luke Russell (2010). Evil, Monsters and Dualism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (1):45 - 58.
    In his book The Myth of Evil , Phillip Cole claims that the concept of evil divides normal people from inhuman, demonic and monstrous wrongdoers. Such monsters are found in fiction, Cole maintains, but not in reality. Thus, even if the concept of evil has the requisite form to be explanatorily useful, it will be of no explanatory use in the real world. My aims in this paper are to assess Cole’s arguments for the claim that there are no actual (...)
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  5. Luke Russell (2010). Two Kinds of Normativity : Korsgaard V. Hume. In Charles R. Pigden (ed.), Hume on Motivation and Virtue. Palgrave Macmillan. 208.
  6. Luke Russell (2009). He Did It Because He Was Evil. American Philosophical Quarterly 46 (3):267 - 282.
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  7. Luke Russell (2009). Is Situationism All Bad News? Utilitas 21 (4):443-463.
    Situationist experiments such as the Milgram experiment and the Princeton Seminary experiment have prompted philosophers to warn us against succumbing to fear of embarrassment and sliding down slippery slopes. Yet it would be a mistake to conclude that situationism is all bad news for moral agents. Fear of embarrassment can often motivate right actions, and slippery slopes can slide us away from wrongdoing. The reason that philosophers have seen situationism as bringing all bad news is that they have focused on (...)
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  8. Luke Russell (2008). Moral Skepticisms - by Walter Sinnott-Armstrong. Philosophical Books 49 (1):80-81.
  9. Luke Russell (2007). Is Evil Action Qualitatively Distinct From Ordinary Wrongdoing? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (4):659 – 677.
    Adam Morton, Stephen de Wijze, Hillel Steiner, and Eve Garrard have defended the view that evil action is qualitatively distinct from ordinary wrongdoing. By this, they do not that mean that evil actions feel different to ordinary wrongs, but that they have motives or effects that are not possessed to any degree by ordinary wrongs. Despite their professed intentions, Morton and de Wijze both offer accounts of evil action that fail to identify a clear qualitative difference between evil and ordinary (...)
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  10. Luke Russell (2007). What Even Consequentialists Should Say About the Virtues. Utilitas 19 (4):466-486.
    In Uneasy Virtue, Julia Driver advocates a consequentialist account of the virtues. In so far as her view is , Driver's account is superior to the psychologically rich theories of virtue offered by Aristotle, Hume and Kant. However, Driver is also committed to about virtue: a trait is a virtue only if it has instrumental value. In contrast, I argue for a form of minimalism, according to which a character trait counts as a virtue if it has either instrumental or (...)
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  11. Luke Russell (2006). Evil-Revivalism Versus Evil-Skepticism. Journal of Value Inquiry 40 (1):89-105.
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  12. Luke Russell (2006). See the World: McDowell and the Normative Trilemma. Dialogue 45 (1):69-88.
    McDowell argues that the shortcomings of recent theories of experience are the product of the modern scientistic conception of nature. Reconceive nature, he suggests, and we can explain how perceptual experience can be an external constraint on thought that, moreover, has conceptual import. In this article I argue that McDowell’s project is unsuccessful. Those wishing to construct normative theories, including theories of perceptual experience, face the normative trilemma—they must choose one of three styles of theory, each of which exhibits a (...)
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