Search results for 'Luke van Horn' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Andrew M. Bailey, Joshua Rasmussen & Luke Van Horn (2011). No Pairing Problem. Philosophical Studies 154 (3):349 - 360.score: 870.0
    Many have thought that there is a problem with causal commerce between immaterial souls and material bodies. In Physicalism or Something Near Enough, Jaegwon Kim attempts to spell out that problem. Rather than merely posing a question or raising a mystery for defenders of substance dualism to answer or address, he offers a compelling argument for the conclusion that immaterial souls cannot causally interact with material bodies. We offer a reconstruction of that argument that hinges on two premises: Kim's Dictum (...)
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  2. Nathan Rotenstreich, Paul Mendes-Flohr, Friedrich Niewöhner, Christoph Von Wolzogen, Johannes Van Oort, Friedrich Wilhelm Horn & Manfred Hutter (1994). Brill Online Books and Journals. Zeitschrift für Religions-Und Geistesgeschichte 46 (2).score: 240.0
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  3. Samenvatting van (forthcoming). De Stem van de St (r) aat. Res Publica.score: 120.0
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  4. Andrew M. Bailey, Joshua Rasmussen & Luke van Horn (2011). No Pairing Problem. Philosophical Studies 154 (3):349-360.score: 87.0
    Many have thought that there is a problem with causal commerce between immaterial souls and material bodies. In Physicalism or Something Near Enough, Jaegwon Kim attempts to spell out that problem. Rather than merely posing a question or raising a mystery for defenders of substance dualism to answer or address, he offers a compelling argument for the conclusion that immaterial souls cannot causally interact with material bodies. We offer a reconstruction of that argument that hinges on two premises: Kim’s Dictum (...)
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  5. Luke Van Horn (2010). Merricks's Soulless Savior. Faith and Philosophy 27 (3):330-341.score: 87.0
    Trenton Merricks has recently argued that substance dualist accounts of embodiment and humanness do not cohere well with the Incarnation. He has also claimed that physicalism about human persons avoids this problem, which should lead Christians to be physicalists. In this paper, I argue that there are plausible dualist accounts of embodiment and humanness that avoid his objections. Furthermore, I argue that physicalism is inconsistent with the Incarnation.
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  6. R. van Rooy (forthcoming). Signalling Games Select Horn Strategies; Ms Universiteit van Amsterdam. Linguistics and Philosophy.score: 78.0
     
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  7. Paul-Émile Langevin (1991). Van Segbroeck, Frans, Dir., The Gospel of Luke. A Cumulative Bibliography 1973-1988Van Segbroeck, Frans, Dir., The Gospel of Luke. A Cumulative Bibliography 1973-1988. [REVIEW] Laval Théologique Et Philosophique 47 (3):435-436.score: 72.0
  8. April Oettinger (2011). Lorne Campbell, Miguel Falomir, Jennifer Fletcher, and Luke Syson, Eds., Renaissance Faces: Van Eyck to Titian. London: National Gallery Company, 2008. Pp. 304; Color Frontispiece and Many Black-and-White and Color Figures. $70. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (1):172-173.score: 72.0
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  9. Andrew Benjamin (2011). On the Image of Painting. Research in Phenomenology 41 (2):181-205.score: 36.0
    Painting can only be thought in relation to the image. And yet, with (and within) painting what continues to endure is the image of painting. While this is staged explicitly in, for example, paintings of St. Luke by artists of the Northern Renaissance—e.g., Rogier van der Weyden, Jan Gossaert, and Simon Marmion—the same concerns are also at work within both the practices as well as the contemporaneous writings that define central aspects of the Italian Renaissance. The aim of this (...)
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  10. Robert Van Rooy (2004). Signalling Games Select Horn Strategies. Linguistics and Philosophy 27 (4):493 - 527.score: 30.0
    In this paper I will discuss why (un) marked expressions typically get an (un)marked interpretation: <span class='Hi'>Horn</span>'s division of pragmatic labor. It is argued that it is a conventional fact that we use language this way. This convention will be explained in terms of the equilibria of signalling games introduced by Lewis (1969), but now in an evolutionary setting. I will also relate this signalling game analysis with Parikh's (1991, 2000, 2001) game-theoretical analysis of successful communication, which in turn (...)
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  11. Robert van Rooy (2004). Signalling Games Select Horn Strategies. Linguistics and Philosophy 27 (4):493-527.score: 30.0
    In this paper I will discuss why (un) marked expressionstypically get an (un)marked interpretation: Horn''sdivision of pragmatic labor. It is argued that it is aconventional fact that we use language this way.This convention will be explained in terms ofthe equilibria of signalling games introduced byLewis (1969), but now in an evolutionary setting. Iwill also relate this signalling game analysis withParikh''s (1991, 2000, 2001) game-theoretical analysis ofsuccessful communication, which in turn is compared withBlutner''s: 2000) bi-directional optimality theory.
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  12. Eric Schliesser, Inventing Paradigms, Monopoly, Methodology, and Mythology at 'Chicago': Nutter and Stigler.score: 28.0
    This paper focuses on Warren Nutter’s The Extent of Enterprise Monopoly in the United States, 1899-1939. This started out as a (1949) doctoral dissertation at The University of Chicago, part of Aaron Director’s Free Market Study. Besides Director, O.H. Brownlee and Milton Friedman were closely involved with supervising it. It was published by The University of Chicago Press in 1951. In the 1950s the book was explicitly understood as belonging to the “Chicago School” (Dow and Abernathy 1963). By articulating the (...)
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  13. Edward Nik-Khah & Robert Van Horn (2012). Inland Empire: Economics Imperialism as an Imperative of Chicago Neoliberalism. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (3):259-282.score: 28.0
    Recent work such as Steven Levitt's Freakonomics has prompted economic methodologists to reevaluate the state of relations between economics and its neighboring disciplines. Although this emerging literature on ?economics imperialism? has its merits, the positions advanced within it have been remarkably divergent: some have argued that economics imperialism is a fiction; others that it is a fact attributable to the triumph of neoclassical economics; and yet others that the era of economics imperialism is over. We believe the confusion results in (...)
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  14. S. Bem, H. Rappard & W. van Horn (eds.) (1985). Studies in the History of Psychology and the Social Sciences 3. Psychologisch Instituut.score: 28.0
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  15. Andrei Irimia & John D. Van Horn (2014). Systematic Network Lesioning Reveals the Core White Matter Scaffold of the Human Brain. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 28.0
  16. Clarence Eugene Van Horn (1928). A System of Relative Existential Propositions Connected with the Relation of Class-Membership.score: 28.0
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  17. J. D. Van Horn (2004). Cognitive Neuroimaging: History, Developments, and Directions. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. Mit Press.score: 28.0
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  18. H. H. van Horn, T. J. Cunha & R. H. Harms (1972). The Role of Livestock in Meeting Human Food Needs. Bioscience 22 (12):710-714.score: 28.0
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  19. Robert Van Horn & Philip Mirowski (forthcoming). The Road to a World Made Safe for Corporations: The Rise of the Chicago School. Modern Intellectual History.score: 28.0
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  20. Wayne A. Davis, Irregular Negations.score: 24.0
    Horn (1989) identified a number of irregular or marked negations that are not used in accordance with the standard rule of propositional logic. He concluded that negation was pragmatically ambiguous. Van der Sandt (1991) disputed Horn’s ambiguity claim, and proposed a uniform semantics for all negations. I will provide an informal explanation of van der Sandt’s theory, and develop a number of objections. I show that irregular negations are not anaphoric, as Van der Sandt believes, but compositional. I (...)
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  21. Melvin Fitting (1988). Pseudo-Boolean Valued Prolog. Studia Logica 47 (2):85 - 91.score: 24.0
    A generalization of conventional Horn clause logic programming is proposed in which the space of truth values is a pseudo-Boolean or Heyting algebra, whose members may be thought of as evidences for propositions. A minimal model and an operational semantics is presented, and their equivalence is proved, thus generalizing the classic work of Van Emden and Kowalski.
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  22. J. Katz, Resumptive Negation as Assertion Revision.score: 24.0
    Jespersen (1860-1934:73-75) described what he called resumptive negation: “A second class [of emphatic negation] comprises what may be termed resumptive negation, the characteristic of which is that after a negative sentence has been completed, something is added in a negative form with the obvious result that the negative result is heightened. . . . In its pure form, the supplementary negative is added outside the frame of the first sentence, generally as a afterthought, as in ‘I shall never do it, (...)
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  23. Pieter A. M. Seuren (1988). Presupposition and Negation. Journal of Semantics 6 (1):175-226.score: 24.0
    This paper is an attempt to show that given the available observations on the behaviour of negation and presuppositions there is no simpler explanation than to assume that natural language has two distinct negation operators, the minimal negation which preserves presuppositions and the radical negation which does not. The three-valued logic emerging from this distinction, and especially its model-theory, are discussed in detail. It is, however, stressed that the logic itself is only epiphenomenal on the structures and processes involved in (...)
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  24. Luke la van (2003). Antique City: Activity Spaces in Practice. In Luke Lavan & William Bowden (eds.), Theory and Practice in Late Antique Archaeology. Brill. 314.score: 24.0
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  25. Luke K. Ursell, William Van Treuren, Jessica L. Metcalf, Meg Pirrung, Andrew Gewirtz & Rob Knight (2013). Replenishing Our Defensive Microbes. Bioessays 35 (9):810-817.score: 24.0
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  26. Ludger Jansen & Christoph Jedan (2010). Philosophische Anthropologie in der Antike. Ontos.score: 24.0
    Mit Beiträgen von Ursula Bittrich, Yves Bossart, Jan N. Bremmer, Thomas Buchheim, Christoph Horn, Ludger Jansen, Christoph Jedan, Geurt Henk van Kooten, Zbigniew Nerczuk, Matthias Perkams, Joachim Söder, Niko Strobach, Hartmut Westermann und Jula Wildberger.
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  27. Steven H. Mathews & Ernest Van Eck (2013). Fasting, Justification, and Self-Righteousness in Luke 18: 9-14: A Social-Scientific Interpretation as Response to Friedrichson. [REVIEW] Hts Theological Studies 69 (1):1-9.score: 24.0
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  28. Peter Van Nuffelen (2013). Among the Gentiles: Greco-Roman Religion and Christianity by Luke Timothy Johnson (Review). Common Knowledge 19 (2):389-390.score: 24.0
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  29. A. Staley Groves (2011). The Poetry of Adam Staley Groves. Introduction by Vincent W.J. Van Gerven Oei. Continent 1 (1):52-59.score: 22.0
    continent. 1.1 (2011): 52-59. Introduction Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei Adam Staley Groves is a poet of thought. I say this with the greatest sincerity. Hence a thorough reading of even this small selection of his work in the length of an introduction is impossible. Such is the diligent reader’s task! Nevertheless, my choice for Staley Groves, like all choices, demands a justification, which I would like to formulate as follows. Staley Groves fits in the heroic tradition of poets that (...)
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  30. Peter Hawke (2011). Van Inwagen's Modal Skepticism. Philosophical Studies 153 (3):351-364.score: 18.0
    In this paper, the author defends Peter van Inwagen’s modal skepticism. Van Inwagen accepts that we have much basic, everyday modal knowledge, but denies that we have the capacity to justify philosophically interesting modal claims that are far removed from this basic knowledge. The author also defends the argument by means of which van Inwagen supports his modal skepticism, offering a rebuttal to an objection along the lines of that proposed by Geirrson. Van Inwagen argues that Stephen Yablo’s recent and (...)
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  31. Marc Alspector-Kelly (2004). Seeing the Unobservable: Van Fraassen and the Limits of Experience. [REVIEW] Synthese 140 (3):331-353.score: 18.0
    I. Introduction “We can and do see the truth about many things: ourselves, others, trees and animals, clouds and rivers—in the immediacy of experience.”1 Absent from Bas van Fraassen’s list of those things we see are paramecia and mitochondria. We do not see such things, van Fraassen has long maintained, because they are unobservable, that is, they are undetectable by means of the unaided senses.2 But notice that these two notions—what we can see in the “immediacy” of experience and what (...)
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  32. Peter van Inwagen (2004). Van Inwagen on Free Will. In Joseph K. Campbell (ed.), Freedom and Determinism. Cambridge MA: Bradford Book/MIT Press.score: 18.0
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  33. Meghan E. Griffith (2005). Does Free Will Remain a Mystery? A Response to Van Inwagen. Philosophical Studies 124 (3):261-269.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I argue against Peter van Inwagen’s claim (in “Free Will Remains a Mystery”), that agent-causal views of free will could do nothing to solve the problem of free will (specifically, the problem of chanciness). After explaining van Inwagen’s argument, I argue that he does not consider all possible manifestations of the agent-causal position. More importantly, I claim that, in any case, van Inwagen appears to have mischaracterized the problem in some crucial ways. Once we are clear on (...)
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  34. Federica Russo (2006). Salmon and Van Fraassen on the Existence of Unobservable Entities: A Matter of Interpretation of Probability. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 11 (3):221-247.score: 18.0
    A careful analysis of Salmon’s Theoretical Realism and van Fraassen’s Constructive Empiricism shows that both share a common origin: the requirement of literal construal of theories inherited by the Standard View. However, despite this common starting point, Salmon and van Fraassen strongly disagree on the existence of unobservable entities. I argue that their different ontological commitment towards the existence of unobservables traces back to their different views on the interpretation of probability via different conceptions of induction. In fact, inferences to (...)
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  35. Michael Huemer (2000). Van Inwagen's Consequence Argument. Philosophical Review 109 (4):525-544.score: 18.0
    Peter van Inwagen’s argument for incompatibilism uses a sentential operator, “N”, which can be read as “No one has any choice about the fact that . . . .” I show that, given van Inwagen’s understanding of the notion of having a choice, the argument is invalid. However, a different interpretation of “N” can be given, such that the argument is clearly valid, the premises remain highly plausible, and the conclusion implies that free will is incompatible with determinism.
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  36. Janez Bregant (2004). Van Gulick's Solution of the Exclusion Problem Revisited. Acta Analytica 19 (33):83-94.score: 18.0
    The anti-reductionist who wants to preserve the causal efficacy of mental phenomena faces several problems in regard to mental causation, i.e. mental events which cause other events, arising from her desire to accept the ontological primacy of the physical and at the same time save the special character of the mental. Psychology tries to persuade us of the former, appealing thereby to the results of experiments carried out in neurology; the latter is, however, deeply rooted in our everyday actions and (...)
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  37. Silvio Seno Chibeni (2008). Explanations in Microphysics: A Response to van Fraassen's Argument. Principia 12 (1):49-72.score: 18.0
    http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1808-1711.2008v12n1p49 The aim of this article is to offer a rejoinder to an argument against scientific realism put forward by van Fraassen, based on theoretical considerations regarding microphysics. At a certain stage of his general attack to scientific realism, van Fraassen argues, in contrast to what realists typically hold, that empirical regularities should sometimes be regarded as “brute facts”, which do not ask for explanation in terms of deeper, unobservable mechanisms. The argument from microphysics formulated by van Fraassen is based (...)
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  38. John Martin Fischer (1986). Van Inwagen on Free Will. Philosophical Quarterly 36 (April):252-260.score: 18.0
    I discuss van inwagen's "first formal argument" for the incompatibility of causal determinism and freedom to do otherwise. I distinguish different interpretations of the important notion, "s can render p false." I argue that on none of these interpretations is the argument clearly sound. I point to gaps in the argument, Although I do not claim that it is unsound.
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  39. Mitchell O. Stokes (2007). Van Inwagen and the Quine-Putnam Indispensability Argument. Erkenntnis 67 (3):439 - 453.score: 18.0
    In this paper I do two things: (1) I support the claim that there is still some confusion about just what the Quine-Putnam indispensability argument is and the way it employs Quinean meta-ontology and (2) I try to dispel some of this confusion by presenting the argument in a way which reveals its important meta-ontological features, and include these features explicitly as premises. As a means to these ends, I compare Peter van Inwagen’s argument for the existence of properties with (...)
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  40. Helen Longino (2009). Perilous Thoughts: Comment on Van Fraassen. Philosophical Studies 143 (1):25 - 32.score: 18.0
    Bas van Fraassen’s empiricist reading of Perrin’s achievement invites the question: whose doubts about atoms did Perrin put to rest? This comment recontextualizes the argument and applies the notion of empirical grounding to some contemporary work in behavioral biology.
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  41. Philippe De Rouilhan (2012). In Defense of Logical Universalism: Taking Issue with Jean van Heijenoort. [REVIEW] Logica Universalis 6 (3-4):553-586.score: 18.0
    Van Heijenoort’s main contribution to history and philosophy of modern logic was his distinction between two basic views of logic, first, the absolutist, or universalist, view of the founding fathers, Frege, Peano, and Russell, which dominated the first, classical period of history of modern logic, and, second, the relativist, or model-theoretic, view, inherited from Boole, Schröder, and Löwenheim, which has dominated the second, contemporary period of that history. In my paper, I present the man Jean van Heijenoort (Sect. 1); then (...)
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  42. John Bacon (1990). Van Cleve Versus Closure. Philosophical Studies 58 (3):239-242.score: 18.0
    In "Supervenience, Necessary Coextension, and Reducibility" (Philosophical Studies 49, 1986, 163-176), among other results, I showed that weak or ordinary supervenience is equivalent to Jaegwon Kim's strong supervenience, given certain assumptions: S4 modality, the usual modal conception of properties as class-concepts, and diagonal closure or resplicing of the set of base properties. This last means that any mapping of possible worlds into extensions of base properties counts itself as a base property. James Van Cleve attacks the modal conception of property (...)
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  43. Paul C. Anders (2011). Mind, Mortality and Material Being. Sophia 50 (1):25-37.score: 18.0
    Many religiously minded materialist philosophers have attempted to understand the doctrine of the survival of death from within a physicalist approach. Their goal is not to show the doctrine false, but to explain how it can be true. One such approach has been developed by Peter van Inwagen. After explaining what I call the duplication objection, I present van Inwagen’s proposal and show how a proponent might attempt to solve the problem of duplication. I argue that the very features of (...)
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  44. Anita Burdman Feferman (2012). Jean van Heijenoort: Kaleidoscope. [REVIEW] Logica Universalis 6 (3-4):277-291.score: 18.0
    Leitmotifs in the life of Jean van Heijenoort.
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  45. Harold W. Noonan (forthcoming). Tollensing van Inwagen. Philosophia:1-7.score: 18.0
    Van Inwagen (1990) has an ingenious argument for the non-existence of human artefacts (and other non-living complex things). But the argument cannot be accepted, since human artefacts are everywhere. However, it cannot be ignored. The proper response to it is to treat it as a refutation of its least plausible premise, i.e., to ‘tollens’ it. I first set out van Inwagen’s argument. I then identify its least plausible premise and explain the consequence of denying it, that is, the acceptance of (...)
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  46. Jennifer L. Soerensen (2013). The Local Problem of God's Hiddenness: A Critique of van Inwagen's Criterion of Philosophical Success. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (3):297-314.score: 18.0
    In regards to the problem of evil, van Inwagen thinks there are two arguments from evil which require different defenses. These are the global argument from evil—that there exists evil in general, and the local argument from evil—that there exists some particular atrocious evil X. However, van Inwagen fails to consider whether the problem of God’s hiddenness also has a “local” version: whether there is in fact a “local” argument from God’s hiddenness which would be undefeated by his general defense (...)
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  47. Irving H. Anellis (2012). Editor's Introduction to Jean van Heijenoort, Historical Development of Modern Logic. Logica Universalis 6 (3-4):301-326.score: 18.0
    Van Heijenoort’s account of the historical development of modern logic was composed in 1974 and first published in 1992 with an introduction by his former student. What follows is a new edition with a revised and expanded introduction and additional notes.
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  48. Robert Frodeman (2008). Redefining Ecological Ethics: Science, Policy, and Philosophy at Cape Horn. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):597-610.score: 18.0
    In the twentieth century, philosophy (especially within the United States) embraced the notion of disciplinary expertise: philosophical research consists of working with and writing for other philosophers. Projects that involve non-philosophers earn the deprecating title of “applied” philosophy. The University of North Texas (UNT) doctoral program in philosophy exemplifies the possibility of a new model for philosophy, where graduate students are trained in academic philosophy and in how to work with scientists, engineers, and policy makers. This “field” (rather than “applied”) (...)
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  49. Kenshi Miyabe (2010). An Extension of van Lambalgen's Theorem to Infinitely Many Relative 1-Random Reals. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 51 (3):337-349.score: 18.0
    Van Lambalgen's Theorem plays an important role in algorithmic randomness, especially when studying relative randomness. In this paper we extend van Lambalgen's Theorem by considering the join of infinitely many reals which are random relative to each other. In addition, we study computability of the reals in the range of Omega operators. It is known that $\Omega^{\phi'}$ is high. We extend this result to that $\Omega^{\phi^{(n)}}$ is $\textrm{high}_n$ . We also prove that there exists A such that, for each n (...)
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  50. John W. Dawson Jr (2012). Jean van Heijenoort and the Gödel Editorial Project. Logica Universalis 6 (3-4):293-299.score: 18.0
    A colleague’s personal recollections of Jean van Heijenoort’s contributions to the editing of volumes I–III of Gödel’s Collected Works and of his interactions with the other editors.
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