Search results for 'Lundy Braun' (try it on Scholar)

307 found
Sort by:
  1. Lundy Braun (2002). Race, Ethnicity, and Health: Can Genetics Explain Disparities? Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 45 (2):159-174.score: 240.0
  2. David Braun (2005). Empty Names, Fictional Names, Mythical Names. Noûs 39 (4):596–631.score: 60.0
    John Stuart Mill (1843) thought that proper names denote individuals and do not connote attributes. Contemporary Millians agree, in spirit. We hold that the semantic content of a proper name is simply its referent. We also think that the semantic content of a declarative sentence is a Russellian structured proposition whose constituents are the semantic contents of the sentence’s constituents. This proposition is what the sentence semantically expresses. Therefore, we think that sentences containing proper names semantically express singular propositions, which (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. David Braun (2013). Invariantism About 'Can' and 'May' (as Well as 'Might'). Linguistics and Philosophy 36 (2):181-185.score: 60.0
    Braun (Linguistics & Philosophy 35, 461–489, 2012) argued for a non- relativist, invariantist theory of ‘might’. Yanovich (Linguistics & Philosophy, 2013) argues that Braun’s theory is inconsistent with certain facts concerning diachronic meaning changes in ‘might’, ‘can’, and ‘may’. This paper replies to Yanovich’s objection.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Paul Braun (1988). Deception in Journalism. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 3 (1):77 – 83.score: 60.0
    Does the Journalist have the ethical right to deceive in pursuit of a story? This article discusses the ethical implications of deception in the news?gathering process and offers some suggestions to aid journalists in knowing when to go undercover in pursuit of a story. The essay was written by Paul Braun, a spohomore, for an ethics course taught by Prof essor Ronald Koshoshek.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Thom Braun (2004). The Philosophy of Branding: Great Philosophers Think Brands. London ;Kogan Page.score: 60.0
    In this original and imaginative slant on contemporary brand management, Thom Braun takes us into the minds of the world's greatest Western thinkers to reveal what they might say about branding if they were alive today.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Mariann F. Hudak, Patricia Gervan, Bjorn Friedrich, Alexander Pastukhov, Jochen Braun & Ilona Kovacs (2011). Increased Readiness for Adaptation and Faster Alternation Rates Under Binocular Rivalry in Children. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 60.0
    Binocular rivalry in childhood has poorly been investigated in the past. Information is scarce with respect to infancy, and there is a complete lack of data on the development of binocular rivalry beyond the first 4-5 years of age. In this study, we are attempting to fill this gap by investigating the developmental trends in binocular rivalry in pre-puberty. We employ a classic behavioral paradigm with orthogonal gratings, and introduce novel statistical measures (after Pastukhov and Braun) to analyze the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. David Braun (1993). Empty Names. Noûs 27 (4):449-469.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. David M. Braun (1998). Understanding Belief Reports. Philosophical Review 107 (4):555-595.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I defend a well-known theory of belief reports from an important objection. The theory is Russellianism, sometimes also called `neo-Russellianism', `Millianism', `the direct reference theory', `the "Fido"-Fido theory', or `the naive theory'. The objection concernssubstitution of co-referring names in belief sentences. Russellianism implies that any two belief sentences, that differ only in containing distinct co-referring names, express the same proposition (in any given context). Since `Hesperus' and `Phosphorus' both refer to the planet Venus, this view implies that (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. David Braun (1996). Demonstratives and Their Linguistic Meanings. Noûs 30 (2):145-173.score: 30.0
    In this paper, I present a new semantics for demonstratives. Now some may think that David Kaplan (1989a,b) has already given a more than satisfactory semantics for demonstratives, and that there is no need for a new one. But I argue below that Kaplan's theory fails to describe the linguistic meanings of 'that' and other true demonstratives. My argument for this conclusion has nothing to do with cognitive value, belief sentences, or other such contentious matters in semantics and the philosophy (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. David Braun, Indexicals.score: 30.0
    Indexicals are linguistic expressions whose reference shifts from context to context: some paradigm examples are ‘I’, ‘here’, ‘now’, ‘today’,‘he’, ‘she’, and ‘that’. Two speakers who utter a single sentence that contains an indexical may say different things. For instance, Fred and Wilma say different things when they utter the sentence ‘I am female’. Many philosophers (following David Kaplan 1989a) hold that indexicals have two sorts of meaning. The first sort of meaning is often called ‘character’ or ‘linguistic meaning’; the second (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. David M. Braun (2002). Cognitive Significance, Attitude Ascriptions, and Ways of Believing Propositions. Philosophical Studies 108 (1-2):65-81.score: 30.0
    We use names to talk about objects. We use predicates to talk about properties and relations. We use sentences to attribute properties and relations to objects. We say things when we utter sentences, often things we believe.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. David Braun (1995). What is Character? Journal of Philosophical Logic 24 (3):241--273.score: 30.0
  13. David Braun (2008). Complex Demonstratives and Their Singular Contents. Linguistics and Philosophy 31 (1):57-99.score: 30.0
    This paper presents a semantic and pragmatic theory of complex demonstratives. According to this theory, the semantic content of a complex demonstrative, in a context, is simply an object, and the semantic content of a sentence that contains a complex demonstrative, in a context, is a singular proposition. This theory is defended from various objections to direct reference theories of complex demonstratives, including King's objection from quantification into complex demonstratives.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. David M. Braun (1991). Proper Names, Cognitive Contents, and Beliefs. Philosophical Studies 62 (3):289 - 305.score: 30.0
  15. David Braun & Theodore Sider (2007). Vague, So Untrue. Noûs 41 (2):133 - 156.score: 30.0
    According to an old and attractive view, vagueness must be eliminated before semantic notions — truth, implication, and so on — may be applied. This view was accepted by Frege, but is rarely defended nowadays.1 This..
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. David Braun & Jennifer Saul (2002). Simple Sentences, Substitutions, and Mistaken Evaluations. Philosophical Studies 111 (1):1 - 41.score: 30.0
    Many competent speakers initially judge that (i) is true and (ii) isfalse, though they know that (iii) is true. (i) Superman leaps more tallbuildings than Clark Kent. (ii) Superman leaps more tall buildings thanSuperman. (iii) Superman is identical with Clark Kent. Semanticexplanations of these intuitions say that (i) and (ii) really can differin truth-value. Pragmatic explanations deny this, and say that theintuitions are due to misleading implicatures. This paper argues thatboth explanations are incorrect. (i) and (ii) cannot differ intruth-value, yet (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Theodore Sider & David Braun (2006). Review: Kripke's Revenge. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 128 (3):669 - 682.score: 30.0
    Millianism says that the semantic content of a name (or indexical) is simply its referent. This thesis arises within a general, powerful research program, the propositionalist approach to semantics, which sets as a goal for philosophical semantics an assignment of entities — semantic contents — to bits of language, culminating in the assignment of propositions to sentences. Communication, linguistic competence, truth conditions, and other semantic phenomena are ultimately explained in terms of semantic contents. Over 100 years ago Frege (1952/1892) pointed (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. David Braun (2006). Now You Know Who Hong Oak Yun Is. Philosophical Issues 16 (1):24-42.score: 30.0
    Hong Oak Yun is a person who is over three inches tall. And now you know who Hong Oak Yun is. For if someone were to ask you ‘Who is Hong Oak Yun?’, you could answer that Hong Oak Yun is a person who is over three inches tall, and you would know what you were saying. So you know an answer to the question ‘Who is Hong Oak Yun?’, and that is sufficient for knowing who Hong Oak Yun is. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. David Braun (2001). Russellianism and Explanation. Noûs 35 (s15):253-289.score: 30.0
    Many philosophers think that the Substitution Objection decisively refutes Russellianism. This objection claims that sentences (1) and (2) can differ in truth value. Therefore, it says, the sentences express different propositions, and so Russellianism is false.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. David M. Braun (2000). Russellianism and Psychological Generalizations. Noûs 34 (2):203-236.score: 30.0
    (1) Harry believes that Twain is a writer. (2) Harry believes that Clemens is a writer. I say that this is Russellianism's most notorious consequence because it is so often used to argue against the view: many philosophers think that it is obvious that (1) and (2) can differ in truth value, and so they conclude that Russellianism is false. Let's call this the Substitution Objection to Russellianism.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. David Braun (2013). Contextualism About 'Might' and Says-That Ascriptions. Philosophical Studies 164 (2):485-511.score: 30.0
    Contextualism about ‘might’ says that the property that ‘might’ expresses varies from context to context. I argue against contextualism. I focus on problems that contextualism apparently has with attitude ascriptions in which ‘might’ appears in an embedded ‘that’-clause. I argue that contextualists can deal rather easily with many of these problems, but I also argue that serious difficulties remain with collective and quantified says-that ascriptions. Herman Cappelen and John Hawthorne atempt to deal with these remaining problems, but I argue that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. David Braun (2006). Names and Natural Kind Terms. In Ernest Lepore & Barry C. Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oxford University Press. 490--515.score: 30.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Jochen Braun (2001). Inattentional Blindness: It's Great but Not Necessarily About Attention. Psyche 7 (6).score: 30.0
  24. David Braun (2008). Problems for a Quantificational Theory of Complex Demonstratives. Philosophical Studies 140 (3):335 - 358.score: 30.0
    This paper presents a number of objections to Jeffrey King's quantificational theory of complex demonstratives. Some of these objections have to do with modality, whereas others concern attitude ascriptions. Various possible replies are considered. The debate between quantificational theorists and direct reference theorists over complex demonstratives is compared with recent debates concerning definite descriptions.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. David M. Braun (1995). Causally Relevant Properties. Philosophical Perspectives 9:447-75.score: 30.0
    In this paper I present an analysis of causal relevance for properties. I believe that most of us are already familiar with the notion of a causally relevant property. But some of us may not recognize it "under that description." So I begin below with some intuitive explanations and some illustrative examples.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. David Braun (2006). Illogical, but Rational. Noûs 40 (2):376–379.score: 30.0
    Stephen Schiffer (200x) says that Nathan Salmon and I are committed to the special-case consequence. He also says that it is possible for (1)-(3) to be true.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. David M. Braun (1991). Content, Causation, and Cognitive Science. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 69 (December):375-89.score: 30.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. F. C. Kolb & Jochen Braun (1995). Blindsight in Normal Observers. Nature 377:336-8.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. David Braun (2003). Scott Soames. 2002. Beyond Rigidity: The Unfinished Semantic Agenda of Naming and Necessity. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 26 (3):367-379.score: 30.0
  30. David Braun (2011). Implicating Questions. Mind and Language 26 (5):574-595.score: 30.0
    I modify Grice's theory of conversational implicature so as to accommodate acts of implicating propositions by asking questions, acts of implicating questions by asserting propositions, and acts of implicating questions by asking questions. I describe the relations between a declarative sentence's semantic content (the proposition it semantically expresses), on the one hand, and the propositions that a speaker locutes, asserts, and implicates by uttering that sentence, on the other. I discuss analogous relations between an interrogative sentence's semantic content (the question (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Peter Braun, Sven Gnutzmann, Fritz Haake, Marek Kuś & Karol Życzkowski (2001). Level Dynamics and Universality of Spectral Fluctuations. Foundations of Physics 31 (4):613-622.score: 30.0
    The spectral fluctuations of quantum (or wave) systems with a chaotic classical (or ray) limit are mostly universal and faithful to random-matrix theory. Taking up ideas of Pechukas and Yukawa we show that equilibrium statistical mechanics for the fictitious gas of particles associated with the parametric motion of levels yields spectral fluctuations of the random-matrix type. Previously known clues to that goal are an appropriate equilibrium ensemble and a certain ergodicity of level dynamics. We here complete the reasoning by establishing (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. David Braun (2001). Russellianism and Prediction. Philosophical Studies 105 (1):59 - 105.score: 30.0
    Russellianism (also called `neo-Russellianism, `Millianism, and `thenaive theory') entails that substitution of co-referring names inattitude ascriptions preserves truth value and proposition expressed.Thus, on this view, if Lucy wants Twain to autograph her book, thenshe also wants Clemens to autograph her book, even if she says ``I donot want Clemens to autograph my book''. Some philosophers (includingMichael Devitt and Mark Richard) claim that attitude ascriptions canbe used to predict behavior, but argue that if Russellianism weretrue, then this would not be so. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Craig Lundy (2011). Deleuze and Guattari's Historiophilosophy: Philosophical Thought and its Historical Milieu. Critical Horizons 12 (2):115-135.score: 30.0
    This paper will examine the relation between philosophical thought and the various milieus in which such thought takes place using the late work of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari. It will argue that their assessment of this relation involves a rearticulation of philosophy as an historiophilosophy. To claim that Deleuze and Guattari promote such a form of philosophy is contentious, as their work is often noted for implementing an ontological distinction between becoming and history, whereby the former is associated with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. S. Stewart Braun (2010). Historical Entitlement and the Practice of Bequest: Is There a Moral Right of Bequest? [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 29 (6):695-715.score: 30.0
    Entitlement theorists claim that bequest is a moral right. The aim of this essay is to determine whether entitlement theorists can, on their own grounds, consistently defend that claim. I argue that even if there is a moral right to self-appropriated property and to engage in inter vivos transfers, it is a mistake to contend that there exists an equivalent moral right to make a bequest. Taxing or regulating bequest does not violate an individual’s moral rights because, regardless of whether (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. David Braun (1995). Katz on Names Without Bearers. Philosophical Review 104 (4):553-576.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. David Braun (2006). Kripke's Revenge. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 128 (3):669 - 682.score: 30.0
    Millianism says that the semantic content of a name (or indexical) is simply its referent. This thesis arises within a general, powerful research program, the propositionalist approach to semantics, which sets as a goal for philosophical semantics an assignment of entities – semantic contents – to bits of language, culminating in the assignment of propositions to sentences. Communication, linguistic competence, truth conditions, and other semantic phenomena are ultimately explained in terms of semantic contents.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. David M. Braun, Comment on David Chalmers' "Probability and Propositions".score: 30.0
    Propositions are the referents of the ‘that’-clauses that appear in the direct object positions of typical ascriptions of assertion, belief, and other binary cognitive relations. In that sense, propositions are the objects of those cognitive relations. Propositions are also the semantic contents (meanings, in one sense ) of declarative sentences, with respect to contexts. They are what sentences semantically express, with respect to contexts. Propositions also bear truth-values. The truth-value of a sentence, in a context, is the truth-value of the (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Kathryn A. Braun, Rhiannon Ellis & Elizabeth F. Loftus (2002). Make My Memory: How Advertising Can Change Our Memories of the Past. Psychology and Marketing 19 (1):1-23.score: 30.0
    Marketers use autobiographical advertising as a means to create nostalgia for their products. This research explores whether such referencing can cause people to believe that they had experiences as children that are mentioned in the ads. In Experiment 1, participants viewed an ad for Disney that suggested that they shook hands with Mickey Mouse as a child. Relative to controls, the ad increased their confidence that they personally had shaken hands with Mickey as a child at a Disney resort. The (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. David Braun (2012). An Invariantist Theory of 'Might' Might Be Right. Linguistics and Philosophy 35 (6):461-489.score: 30.0
    Invariantism about ‘might’ says that ‘might’ semantically expresses the same modal property in every context. This paper presents and defends a version of invariantism. According to it, ‘might’ semantically expresses the same weak modal property in every context. However, speakers who utter sentences containing ‘might’ typically assert propositions concerning stronger types of modality, including epistemic modality. This theory can explain the phenomena that motivate contextualist theories of epistemic uses of ‘might’, and can be defended from objections of the sort that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. David Braun (2008). Persisting Problems for a Quantificational Theory of Complex Demonstratives. Philosophical Studies 141 (3):243 - 262.score: 30.0
    This paper presents a number of objections to Jeffrey King's quantificational theory of complex demonstratives. Some of these objections have to do with modality, whereas others concern attitude ascriptions. Various possible replies are considered. The debate between quantificational theorists and direct reference theorists over complex demonstratives is compared with recent debates concerning definite descriptions.
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. David Braun (1994). Structured Characters and Complex Demonstratives. Philosophical Studies 74 (2):193--219.score: 30.0
    A structured character is a semantic value of a certain sort. Like the more familiar Kaplanian characters, structured characters determine the contents of expressions in contexts. But unlike Kaplanian characters, structured characters also have constituent structures. The semantic theories with which most of us are acquainted do not mention structured characters. But I argue in this paper that these familiar semantic theories fail to make obvious distinctions in meaning---distinctions that can be made by a theory that uses structured characters. Thus (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. David Braun (2004). Consciousness and Cognition. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (2):484–491.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Dietmar Braun (2012). Why Do Scientists Migrate? A Diffusion Model. Minerva 50 (4):471-491.score: 30.0
    This article improves our understanding of the reasons underlying the intellectual migration of scientists from existing cognitive domains to nascent scientific fields. To that purpose we present, first, a number of findings from the sociology of science that give different insights about scientific migration. We then attempt to bring some of these insights together under the conceptual roof of an actor-based approach linking expected utility and diffusion theory. Intellectual migration is seen as the choice of scientists who decide under uncertainty (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Lucien Braun (1979). Théorie Et Histoire de la Philosophie. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 10 (2):234-243.score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Hans-Joachim Braun, Ronald Kroczek & Karl-Heinz Brendgen (1981). Rezensionen. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 12 (2):401-412.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Daniel Brunstetter & Megan Braun (2011). The Implications of Drones on the Just War Tradition. Ethics and International Affairs 25 (3):337-358.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. David Braun (forthcoming). Desiring, Desires, and Desire Ascriptions. Philosophical Studies:1-22.score: 30.0
    Delia Graff Fara (2013) maintains that many desire ascriptions underspecify the content of the relevant agent’s desire. She argues that this is inconsistent with certain initially plausible claims about desiring, desires, and desire ascriptions. This paper defends those initially plausible claims. Part of the defense hinges on metaphysical claims about the relations among desiring, desires, and contents.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Mark E. Jonas, Yoshiaki M. Nakazawa & James Braun (2012). Appetite, Reason, and Education in Socrates' 'City of Pigs'. Phronesis 57 (4):332-357.score: 30.0
    In Book II of the Republic (370c-372d), Socrates briefly depicts a city where each inhabitant contributes to the welfare of all by performing the role for which he or she is naturally suited. Socrates calls this city the `true city' and the `healthy one'. Nearly all commentators have argued that Socrates' praise of the city cannot be taken at face value, claiming that it does not represent Socrates' preferred community. The point of this paper is to argue otherwise. The claim (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Craig Lundy (2013). Who Are Our Nomads Today?: Deleuze's Political Ontology and the Revolutionary Problematic. Deleuze Studies 7 (2):231-249.score: 30.0
    This paper will address the question of the revolution in Gilles Deleuze's political ontology. More specifically, it will explore what kind of person Deleuze believes is capable of bringing about genuine and practical transformation. Contrary to the belief that a Deleuzian programme for change centres on the facilitation of ‘absolute deterritorialisation’ and pure ‘lines of flight’, I will demonstrate how Deleuze in fact advocates a more cautious and incremental if not conservative practice that promotes the ethic of prudence. This will (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. David Braun (2000). Coming to Our Senses. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (2):489-492.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 307