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Profile: Lydia L. Moland (Colby College)
  1. Lydia L. Moland (2012). Benjamin Rutter. The Owl of Minerva 43 (1/2):202-211.
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  2. Lydia L. Moland (2011). Benjamin Rutter. "Hegel on the Modern Arts". The Owl of Minerva 43 (1-2):202-211.
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  3. Lydia L. Moland (2011). Hegel on Political Identity: Patriotism, Nationality, Cosmopolitanism. Northwestern University Press.
    "Hegel on Political Identity" draws on Hegel's political philosophy to engage sometimes contentious contemporary issues such as patriotism, national identity, and cosmopolitanism. I argue that patriotism for Hegel indicates an attitude toward the state, whereas national identity is a response to culture. The two combine, Hegel claims, to enable citizens to develop concrete freedom. I claim that Hegel's account of political identity extends to his notorious theory of world history; I also propose that his resistance to cosmopolitanism be reassessed in (...)
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  4. Lydia L. Moland (2008). Commitments of a Divided Self: Authenticity, Autonomy and Change in Korsgaard's Ethics. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 4 (1):25-44.
    Christine Korsgaard attempts to reinterpret Kantian ethics in a way that might alleviate Bernard Williams’ famous worry that a man cannot save his drowning wife without determining impartially that he may do so. She does this by dividing a reflective self that chooses the commitments that make up an agent’s practical identity from a self defined as a jumble of desires. An agent, she then argues, must act on the commitments chosen by the reflective self on pain of disintegration. Using (...)
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  5. Lydia L. Moland (2006). Moral Integrity and Regret in Nursing. In Sioban Nelson & Suzanne Gordon (eds.), The Complexities of Care: Nursing Reconsidered. Cornell University Press.
    Nurses all too often experience situations that threaten their identification with the caring aspect of their profession. This article examines systematic reasons for the loss of integrity they describe as their lived work experience conflicts with their self-conception. I examine Ruth Barcan Marcus' description of moral dilemmas and the role of regret, arguing that the real experience of regret should not be associated with a lack of integrity. I conclude that a more complex understanding of care in nurses' self-understanding is (...)
     
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  6. Lydia L. Moland (2003). Inheriting, Earning, and Owning. The Owl of Minerva 34 (2):139-170.
    Hegel’s “Anthropology” considers components of an agent’s practical identity that are not chosen but rather inherited: components such as the agent’s temperament, talents, and ethnic background. Through a discussion of habit and happiness, Hegel explores how these inherited traits can become part of the agent’s self-determination. I argue that this process provides a model for explaining how we are obligated within roles we do not choose—roles for instance within the family or as citizens of a state. Through evaluation of an (...)
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  7. Lydia L. Moland (2003). The Importance of Being Committed. Southwest Philosophy Review 19 (1):215-220.
    A subject’s ethical agency is closely tied up with her particular commitments: her ethnic group, her family, her beliefs, her occupation. The question of how these specific commitments relate to the subject’s actions is therefore pivotal to describing moral agency. Christine Korsgaard has proposed a theory whereby a subject’s commitments are an essential part of her moral agency, namely her practical identity. According to this theory, having commitments is normative, a necessary component of an agent’s respect for her own humanity. (...)
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